: laminate flooring install around a Gas fireplace -help



UnToldFox
01-13-2009, 06:18 PM
When it comes to installing laminate flooring against a zero clearance fireplace, how should it be finshed along the bottom of the fireplace?

I cannot run baseboard along the bottom edge of the fireplace, and I think quater round would look kind of funny between the rock on either side of the fireplace (Rock will be installed beside, and above the fireplace)

on either side of the fireplace the 1/4 inch gap between the wall and the laminate flooring will be hidden by the rock. I'm unsure how I will hide the gap directly infront of the fireplace. any ideas?

here is a picture of the fireplace/wall unit

Pee Wee
01-13-2009, 08:01 PM
Cut it tight to finish.....thats it....butt it up.

Personally I'd have a small piece of slate or something for a hearth, then but the shitty laminate to that.:coffee


That'll be $100 design fee....thanks !!

CHIA
01-13-2009, 08:12 PM
Ya, I'd be inclined to put a few 12x12 granite or slate tiles in front of the fireplace, and run the laminate tight to that instead...cheap, effective, clean.

LegalAlien
01-13-2009, 08:41 PM
Whatever you do don't butt it up, over time it won't be tight anymore but there will be, for every row of the laminate a different, little gap. Instead, use a transition strip. This is a (aluminum) rail where a wood or plastic strip clicks in so the laminate can move freely underneath the strip and the expansion gap will be covered.

Libby
01-13-2009, 09:28 PM
Forget the laminate, get a cork floor!

OneTrack
01-13-2009, 09:30 PM
+1 on a transition strip. I'd prefer to use a (colour keyed) vinyl transition strip which will probably look better as well.

Fotura
01-13-2009, 09:41 PM
The laminate needs room to expand and contract. There should be a about 1/4 inch gap between the walls and the laminate.

I'd recommend not having the laminate that close to the fireplace at all because the heat may cause the laminate to bubble or warp.

CHIA
01-13-2009, 10:24 PM
The laminate needs room to expand and contract. There should be a about 1/4 inch gap between the walls and the.

That's what she said

LegalAlien
01-13-2009, 10:37 PM
+1 on a transition strip. I'd prefer to use a (colour keyed) vinyl transition strip which will probably look better as well.
Thanks, I said plastic, but this is of course what I meant.

g_spyder91
01-13-2009, 10:42 PM
I'm pretty sure that the fire code won't allow you to put laminate up against the fireplace and for good reason. Use some other material (i.e. 12"x12" slate) and create a hearth (I think that's what it's called) around the fireplace including on the ground in front.

CHIA
01-13-2009, 11:08 PM
Ideally, you would also add the tile, slate, or whatever you chose, as a surround, on the face of the fireplace as well.....sides & top. It will integrate the entire unit, and look pretty slick when it's done.

BlackScorpion
01-13-2009, 11:36 PM
Don't you have any european friends? They'll tile the whole thing, floor to ceiling, for a cheap bottle of wine and a ham hock.

benk
01-14-2009, 12:04 AM
tile hearth. it's probably required

CrashTested
01-14-2009, 12:45 AM
BCSB interprets the BC Building Code - Pure gold!

adam112
01-14-2009, 08:21 AM
Tile hearth, which is obvious to most. Leave a 1/4" gap between your laminate and the tile hearth and use a transition strip that is designed for exactly this purpose. I installed thousands of square feet of that shitty laminate flooring and this is how you do it. Bottom line.

Here is what the transition strip looks like.

http://www.newkirkpainting.com/floor12.jpg