: Why do football players wear black paint under their eyes?



samps
11-14-2005, 01:04 PM
My friend and I were having a debate on this. I know that it has something to do with light in their eyes. Can anyone provide scientific evidence/proof as to why they do this?

mikeelliot
11-14-2005, 01:07 PM
It makes them look bad ass.

Also reduces glare from the lights.

samps
11-14-2005, 01:12 PM
I know it reduces glare from the lights, but how does it work?

And yes, they look bad ass.

kamen rider
11-14-2005, 01:15 PM
Light colours reflect light while dark colours absorb it. Black is the darkest colour so it will absorb the most light.

... maybe we should wear black under our eyes too when we ride on sunny days...

flyfishinwoman
11-14-2005, 01:20 PM
AFAIK, it reduces the light reflected off their upper cheeks into their eyes, which then reduces the light pollution. This means less distraction for their eyes. Plus, it does look mean, and maybe adds to the psychological intimidation of their opponent.

samps
11-14-2005, 01:22 PM
Ok, sounds good. That is what I originally thought but my friend wouldn't have it. He started talking about light rays and all this crap we learned in physics in uni. That was 8 years ago!!! I don't remember.

KYjelly
11-14-2005, 02:04 PM
Light colours reflect light while dark colours absorb it. Black is the darkest colour so it will absorb the most light.

... maybe we should wear black under our eyes too when we ride on sunny days...

But, "black people" wear it too?

dizzy
11-14-2005, 02:16 PM
doesn't it have something to do with diverting sweat (which can cause glare) off their cheekbones :confused

KYjelly
11-14-2005, 02:19 PM
Makes more sense to me.

Gawd
11-14-2005, 02:36 PM
diverting sweat? how would black paint do that?
I never wore the black paint under the eyes when I played, sun never really bothered me, I imagine it might bother a QB more or something though.
Found bandana very useful for keeping sweat from getting in your eyes though. :)


Ryan

samps
11-14-2005, 02:36 PM
doesn't it have something to do with diverting sweat (which can cause glare) off their cheekbones :confused

Hmm, this does make more sense...maybe if the stuff soaks up sweat.

Damn, I tried searching for an answer, but all the results just say the general light away from eyes stuff. I'd like scientific proof / explanation.

Shovelhead
11-14-2005, 02:41 PM
But, "black people" wear it too?

Because Black people are not black, they're brown.

As an experiment, look into the sky (during the day) and place some black tape (not the shinny electrical tape but the hockey tape) under your eyes and you'll see the difference, a world of difference.

KYjelly
11-14-2005, 02:44 PM
I was partly being fecitious, but sure...

doug
11-14-2005, 03:37 PM
the crap we wore for football was thick tar. get it on your clothes and it was there forever.

it was for glare, not sweat. you wore a sweatband for sweat. like others have said, black absorbs light the best. white would reflect it.

thats why you can get a bad sunburn while skiing/snowboarding.

dizzy
11-14-2005, 03:59 PM
the crap we wore for football was thick tar. get it on your clothes and it was there forever.

it was for glare, not sweat. you wore a sweatband for sweat. like others have said, black absorbs light the best. white would reflect it. So if you're just using the stuff to absorb glare, it needs to be like tar for ?, to prevent being sweated off ?

Gawd
11-14-2005, 04:01 PM
Because Black people are not black, they're brown.
I don't know.. I saw a guy at the mall the other day, he was pretty black.
Just a little sidetracked note here, heh.

But from my experience, Doug is correct, although, im not sure about the tar-like stuff, i think the guys that used it on my team just used face paint, i could be wrong though.


Ryan

kamen rider
11-14-2005, 04:12 PM
It probably also appeals to their tribal roots when people used to ceremoniously apply face paint/markings before going to war or a hunt. I'm not entirely sure but I'd say it was done more for tradition.

Crabalocker
11-14-2005, 04:18 PM
Black, which is a subtractive colour, absorbs all the wavelengths of the visible light spectrum.

Click here to learn some more about how our eyes see colour. (http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/color-perception.htm)


the crap we wore for football was thick tar. get it on your clothes and it was there forever.

When i was a kid playing football, they didn't trust us with any professional products like that. Instead, we'd burn the end of a cork and rub the soot from it under our eyes. It worked really well, but we generally ended up setting fires to garbage cans before game time with the coaches' lighters.
(actually, now that i think of it, maybe it was just a testament to the severe alcoholism of the coaches in the North Delta Minor Football League)

dizzy
11-14-2005, 04:20 PM
It probably also appeals to their tribal roots when people used to ceremoniously apply face paint/markings before going to war or a hunt. I'm not entirely sure but I'd say it was done more for tradition.
kinda like cougars on a Saturday night :roflmao

doug
11-14-2005, 04:28 PM
although, im not sure about the tar-like stuff, i think the guys that used it on my team just used face paint, i could be wrong though.


the stuff we used was like that. i am sure anything that would stick to your face would work the same.

don't forget, it does have to have the ability to stand up to sweat. the heavier and stickier it is, the better chances of it staying on.


baseball players wear the stuff when they play in outdoor stadiums too.

mikeelliot
11-14-2005, 04:57 PM
Black shoe polish?

dhouldsw
11-14-2005, 05:01 PM
I've seen some with ads in them too or something?!? Or wording of some sort, I couldn't see it very well, so maybe it's not very effective advertising...

;D