Chain changing time...
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Thread: Chain changing time...

  1. #1
    Sea to sky junky Array beerye19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Burnaby
    Bike
    99 GSXR 600 SRAD

    Question Chain changing time...

    Hey guys,

    I have a couple of quick (hopefully) questions. I ride a 99 GSXR 600 SRAD and the chain and sprockets are on their last legs.

    1) What type of tools are needed to replace the sprockets and chain?

    2) Is it worth the hassle to do it or get a shop to do it? I am fairly novice when it comes to tinkering.

    3) Any recommended chain/sprockets? I checked the motovan catalog and have been reading some of the posts here and am thinking a gold chain would look pretty sweet!

    4) Where is a good place to buy the parts (and tools)? I live in Burquitlam and I've been going to the Carter Motorsports in Coquitlam so far (they've been awesome but a bit pricey) but I am wondering if there are cheaper options.

    Any other chain wisdom would also be appreciated!

    Thanks!
    Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

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  3. #2
    Twin A Array Jaybo's Avatar
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    Jul 2004
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    Po'Mo
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    Street:SV1000S Race:Ninja 250R, CBR600 F3, DRZ125
    The best way to do it is to find a chain tool. it will allow you to quickly remove the master link and also rivet the new chains master link on. You will also need a socket set to remove your sprockets & any tools you would use to remove your rear tire and the job is best done on with the bike on a rear stand as you will be removing the rear tire.
    It can be done without a tool, but if it's a riveted chain you'll have to cut off the master link with a dremel or a zip cutter, which can be a pain. You can also not rivet the chain back together and use a "clip' style master link but these are not a safe as a riveted style as because a clip is easy to remove, it's possible it might just fall off.
    Removing the front sprocket is best done before the chain is removed and with the bike in neutral and someone standing on the rear brake, also it will help to back off the bolts for the rear sprocket with the tire still on the bike and on the ground.
    you'll most likely have to remove links from the new chain so make sure you measure the chain correct before you remove the links.
    A chain is around $200.00 and each sprocket is around $50.00 to $70.00. If this seems like a lot of work, a shop can do it quick no fuss no muss..
    Last edited by Jaybo; 04-06-2009 at 04:54 PM.
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  4. #3
    Swivel on it Array SkydiveSonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    BC
    Bike
    Chia
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    a "clip' style master link but these are not a safe as a riveted style as because a clip is easy to remove, it's possible it might just fall off..

    Had that happen to me ... fortunately I noticed it before the link worked its way out of the chain .....
    If you wanna say something, speak into the mic. It's right above my balls.

  5. #4
    Stargaze Array Stargaze's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Abbotsford
    Bike
    05 Monster S2R
    Quote Originally Posted by TechyIam View Post
    My advice is not to attempt the replacement yourself this time. I personally don't feel the consequence of a screwup is worth it. It is probably better to start to learn on something else where personal safety is not affected. If you are indeed interested in learning, carefully observe the procedure performed.
    definately worth looking into cost of a shop vs trying to do it yourself... rear sprocket replacement is really easy and you cant really screw anything up with that to be honest.

    front sprocket is a lil more involved but to be honest its not really rocket science to do these jobs..

    if you have a mechanic friend buy a case a beer invite him over as jobs like these go better with 2 people around.

    a rear stand would be an asset to helping you through this

    impact tools are nice as well for removing the front sprocket.

    and a chain riviter tool and a angle grinder work well for getting the chain off and riviting it back on.
    Nick

  6. #5
    Sea to sky junky Array beerye19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Burnaby
    Bike
    99 GSXR 600 SRAD
    Thanks for all the tips and advice guys.

    It sounds like I'd be needing quite a few more tools, and unfortunately I dont have any mechanic friends

    This time I think I might just bring it to the shop to get changed. I would eventually like to be able to do most work on my own bike.

    I might try 5th Gear for a quote, he seems to be highly recommended by others on BCSB. I would have liked to go to the bike night at his place but cant make it. Maybe the April 28th one.

    Let the tool collecting begin!...
    Most motorcycle problems are caused by the nut that connects the handlebars to the saddle.

  7. #6
    Registered User Array
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    vancouver
    Bike
    yamaha
    Check pricings in the Motovan Catalogue FIRST A chain for Your bike From DID (one of the Best..is likely $125 retail)
    Note those are Suggested Retail prices as well . Riveted links Require a Manufacture specific Chain tool,not just some Generic POS tool and Real tools are close to $200...remember a poorly riveted master is far worse than a simple stupid Clip type.

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