Commuter bike for cheaper fuel costs?
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Thread: Commuter bike for cheaper fuel costs?

  1. #1
    Tai-Pan Array XdtesZombie's Avatar
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    Commuter bike for cheaper fuel costs?

    I have been thinking about getting a small cc enduro or supermoto for a while to use as a commuter bike.
    Now with the price of gas going up and up it seems even more logical.
    My Kawasaki ZX12 burns more fuel than my Acura Integra so using the bike I have is not a more fuel efficient option.
    I also want something that requires minimal maintenance that maybe gets washed twice a year and will never die.
    I was thinking about an older Honda xl 350 or something along those lines , however something with supermoto tires might be better as a commuter bike.
    I am a little concerned I will be annoyed at how gutless and slow it may be,but I guess thats what you have to live with if you want to save money on gas.
    I put about 900k's on my car a month going to work at a cost of about $120.
    Any idea what this would cost on a 250 thumper?
    Infidels Rule!

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  3. #2
    I survived Richmond! Array silverfox's Avatar
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    Well, when i had my '08 kawi 250R, i rode it to work every day. The round trip was 75 km. I would get any where between 55 and 62 mpg, depending how hard i was riding it. Plus i'm 215lbs and i always use a luggage carrier.
    I didn't think it was sluggish for a commuter. Hell, in fact, it was gutsier than my hold cb400f. The only thing i didn't like is the fact that it took for ever to warm up and that gave me drivability problems because of carburator icing during the colder season.
    That said, i think it was a great commuter bike.

  4. #3
    Tai-Pan Array XdtesZombie's Avatar
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    I was just thinking about something like this http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/va...111613668.html to go from PoCo to Vancouver and back.
    But I would probably find myself beating the hell out of it on logging roads when I got bored.
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  5. #4
    Registered User Array Cuff's Avatar
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    I know I'm bias but have you considered a Versys? I'll get 50 to 60 mpg depending on use and have enough power to keep me happy and not in trouble. It's high up enough to see over traffic, it can carry two people and bags if needed and it's comfy (with some seat mods) to do an Iron Butt. Lots of rubber options as well.

    As for the washing, mine doesn't see the hose untill it's well above zero. Just clean the chain and lights.
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  6. #5
    Moderator Array CHIA's Avatar
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    By the time you factor in the cost of buying the 2nd bike, insuring it and maintaining it, how long would the payback be, in fuel costs alone?

    I would dare say, without doing the math myself, that it's not going to be a very compelling argument, with cost savings be the ultimate goal here.

    Now, if you were to sell the big green beast, and replace it with something more efficient, you may have a case.
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  7. #6
    Formerly kanelupis Array CanaganD's Avatar
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    Work your margins. You might wanna get a diesel car instead.

    For highway riding on a dirt bike... see if you can swap the rear sprocket.

  8. #7
    Unregistered User Array greenboy's Avatar
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    Chia raises a good point about overall costs considerations above and beyond fuel savings. It's similar to buying a hybrid car, great mileage but disproportionate acquisition/capital cost. In the end no or even negative savings depending on the model you buy.

    On the other hand, a 250 dualsport has its own amenities such as: less annoying to ride in traffic than a sportbike (dare I say, even fun); ability to explore FSR's and trails which opens up a whole new universe.

    I'd recommend a KLX250, you can abuse it at will as it's pretty much bomb-proof, just keep the fluids fresh and chain clean. The mileage will be awesome.

  9. #8
    Moderator Array jeckyll's Avatar
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    Besides the KLX250, I think that a DRZ SM would make a great commuter. Enough power to get around, fun, good for more than just commuting. It's all depending on how much highway travel you've got.

    But as Chia and greenboy pointed out, if you're doing this purely for savings, I think it would take a whole bunch to make up the insurance.

  10. #9
    Registered User Array 5thgear's Avatar
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    Selling my konker 200 Enduro. Way more reliable than an old Xl probably even cheaper .It was a demo it gets around 80mpg . Amazing on fuel. Plus you can come on the Saturday enduro rides.

    http://www.bcsportbikes.com/forum/sh...ghlight=Konker

  11. #10
    Registered User Array pherthyl's Avatar
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    That little konker looks like it would be a fun commuter in the city. If I ever move out of cycling range I'm definitely getting one of these little dualsports. Seems like a waste to fire up the 650 for a short commute.
    My bikes: A random assortment of junk I found in a barn and fixed up.

  12. #11
    NOOOOOB Array htdub's Avatar
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    I saw a Konker with a SM kit last year, looked pretty good, and the owner was loving it.
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  13. #12
    Registered User Array jrw600's Avatar
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    I am sure the Konker would be fine. However, as has been stated, what would you gain? $3000 plus tax. At $1.40 per liter you can buy over 2100 liters of gas. At 10l per 100 kms, you can drive your car or bike 21000 kms for that. It doesn't make sense.
    This is really the last bike I will buy...probably.

  14. #13
    Registered User Array Slow-Vee's Avatar
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    I had a TW200 and a Vino 125. No, they don't use less fuel in town compare to my previous 2 twins. The throttles are usually wide open to squeeze out every ounce of power.

    My collector 76' Honda twin uses even more fuel, but the carb needs adjustment.

  15. #14
    ɹǝsn pǝɹǝʇsıƃǝᴚ Array pinefresh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanaganD
    Work your margins. You might wanna get a diesel car instead.

    For highway riding on a dirt bike... see if you can swap the rear sprocket.
    +1 on this.

    When you factor in tires every ~10-20000km, chain/sprockets every ~20000km, and valve adjustments if pay someone to do them I wouldn't be surprised if it came out close to even with the car without factoring in the purchase cost of the bike.

    The cheapest vehicle I've ever owned was a 90' diesel jetta. Cheap to buy and it consistently got 7-800kms to 55$ worth of diesel even with 250000kms on it.

  16. #15
    Registered User Array Booger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHIA View Post
    By the time you factor in the cost of buying the 2nd bike, insuring it and maintaining it, how long would the payback be, in fuel costs alone?

    I would dare say, without doing the math myself, that it's not going to be a very compelling argument, with cost savings be the ultimate goal here.
    I used the same logic in not replacing my aluminum windows or adding extra insulation in the ceiling. After I factor in the costs, the break even point in savings of heat versus cost of upgrades amounted to 20 years almost. I doubt that I'll be in thes same house to enjoy the benefits of the savings.

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