Help patching up some bodywork - FRONT FAIRING (2000 GSXR-600)
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Thread: Help patching up some bodywork - FRONT FAIRING (2000 GSXR-600)

  1. #1
    Registered User anixon is on a distinguished road
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    Lightbulb Help patching up some bodywork - FRONT FAIRING (2000 GSXR-600)

    Hey guys. My original fairings were showing a lot of age so I took the plunge on some of the chinese made after market fairings. They are dirt cheap it was like 250 for the full set.

    However, WARNING, they are made like crap. The two main issues are:

    1. the fitting is less than ideal, you have to twist and torque the plastics alot to align them. Basically once you get them on you're going to hope you won't have to take them off often.

    2. the screw posts aren't moulded in, they are super cheaply foam-blasted onto the plastic. (Pics to show this). They will hold a screw but will break off EASY! Hence my problem.

    ---------------------------

    So because the fitting was so bad, I guess the front fairing was relatively tight in certain spots and today one of the posts that holds the console snapped off. I think i must have gone over a bump or something.

    I've attached a pic of what happened.I just rebuilt my forks so I don't see the need to take off the front fairing anytime soon I just need it stabilized so it doesn't click and bounce when I ride. I'm thinking of glue-gunning all around the post. Or getting in there with some super glue and just hardening around it without taking it off. I need a glue that is gonna be rock hard and not snap. Any recommendations?

    Alternatively, if I were to take the front fairing off I could fibreglass around the posts to reconnect them and reinforce. But that's a big job... if I did it, it better work and be bulletproof...What do you guys think is the best/easiest fix for this? Please see the pics.


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  3. #2
    Registered User ParkJunkie is on a distinguished road ParkJunkie's Avatar
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    You could build up an area with epoxy, drill it, then thread it and had a new screw hole. Only problem is that epoxy can be pretty brittle and might snap if the fairings are flexing. Or, you could jb weld some plastic there and do the same, that might work better.
    4 posts, 1 ride, 1 crash. That's a good ratio right?
    Quote Originally Posted by 5thgear View Post
    If your passenger can feel you shift ..you suck .

  4. #3
    Registered User anixon is on a distinguished road
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    Oh that stuff looks MONEY! I never knew about JB-Weld. Could I just JB weld around the posting effectively fusing the existing posts to the plastic (i.e. just goob it around the current adhesive?)

    Quote Originally Posted by ParkJunkie View Post
    You could build up an area with epoxy, drill it, then thread it and had a new screw hole. Only problem is that epoxy can be pretty brittle and might snap if the fairings are flexing. Or, you could jb weld some plastic there and do the same, that might work better.

  5. #4
    Registered User ParkJunkie is on a distinguished road ParkJunkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anixon View Post
    Oh that stuff looks MONEY! I never knew about JB-Weld. Could I just JB weld around the posting effectively fusing the existing posts to the plastic (i.e. just goob it around the current adhesive?)
    yea you could definitely do that, it'd be on there for good. Also, just for the record JB Weld is pretty much epoxy, just often referred to as its brand name cause it's solid.
    4 posts, 1 ride, 1 crash. That's a good ratio right?
    Quote Originally Posted by 5thgear View Post
    If your passenger can feel you shift ..you suck .

  6. #5
    100% Asshole SpookyjacK is on a distinguished road SpookyjacK's Avatar
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    Use the epoxy that they use to repair plastic bumpers...can't remember what the name brand is but Google and or call a few bodyshops they should be able to tell you.

  7. #6
    Registered User anixon is on a distinguished road
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    I have some of that cheaper regular epoxy, the kind that comes in the split syringe tube... Would that be strong enough for this purpose or should I go with a more industry tough standard like JB Weld or that bumper stuff ParkJunkie is talking about?

    Quote Originally Posted by ParkJunkie View Post
    yea you could definitely do that, it'd be on there for good. Also, just for the record JB Weld is pretty much epoxy, just often referred to as its brand name cause it's solid.

  8. #7
    100% Asshole SpookyjacK is on a distinguished road SpookyjacK's Avatar
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    Do it once or once a month? Seriously that bumper epoxy once and its done.

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