Does bleeding the brakes mean changing the oil?
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Thread: Does bleeding the brakes mean changing the oil?

  1. #1
    Registered User Array
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    Does bleeding the brakes mean changing the oil?

    What i mean to say is "when i bleed the brakes, is that the same thing as changing the fluid?"
    There is like no separate "change the brake fluid" job. Right?

    Thanks.

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  3. #2
    Registered User Array rgm's Avatar
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    My what?
    As long as you continue to add fluid while you bleed. Do not run the master dry. Once you see clean fluid coming out of the calipers, the brake fluid is changed.
    I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

  4. #3
    Registered User Array Outtahere's Avatar
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    Bleeding the brakes is different from changing, or flushing, the brake fluid.

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    for the crumpet I suppose Array
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    Well, not really. If you bleed them enough, you are changing (flushing) the fluid.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkxcQzhgJLU

    Hope that helps.

  6. #5
    Registered User Array Outtahere's Avatar
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    True, I suppose. But 'bleed' to me means 'get the air out as efficiently as possible.'

  7. #6
    Eyes set on the rubbarb Array kelaog's Avatar
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    I like to take a turkey baster to the reservoir and pull out as much of the old fluid as possible, then continue to bleed until it comes out clean. As long as you thoroughly bleed it and ensure there is no air in there, you've done your job well.
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  8. #7
    Formerly kanelupis Array CanaganD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outtahere View Post
    True, I suppose. But 'bleed' to me means 'get the air out as efficiently as possible.'
    For you to know that you've completely bled the system out, you need to pump enough brake fluid so that you know all the fluid in the lines already have been replaced with new non bubbled fluid. Thus, you are flushing the fluid.

  9. #8
    Is it winter yet ? Array SidewaysInto3rd's Avatar
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    or . you could get a big syringe and a vinyl hose, fill up the syringe with new fluid and reverse bleed it by pushing enough fluid back up the line to see new fluid come into the reservoid. just put some rags around the reservoir to catch the spilling old fluid.

    works better than bleeding down, because air has the tendency to go up


    mmmm breast

  10. #9
    Registered User Array OneTrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SidewaysInto3rd View Post
    or . you could get a big syringe and a vinyl hose, fill up the syringe with new fluid and reverse bleed it by pushing enough fluid back up the line to see new fluid come into the reservoid. just put some rags around the reservoir to catch the spilling old fluid.

    works better than bleeding down, because air has the tendency to go up


    mmmm breast
    Not a good idea for a variety of reasons. Always bleed brakes at the caliper. Pushing crappy brake fluid back up throught the lines to the master cylinder is not desireable.
    A good tip that not many non-mechanics know: After you're finished bleeding the brakes and everything's sealed up again, wash away all spilled brake fluid that's on the bike or ground with fresh, clean water.

  11. #10
    Ridin Dirty Array vstromgreg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanbc View Post
    What i mean to say is "when i bleed the brakes, is that the same thing as changing the fluid?"
    There is like no separate "change the brake fluid" job. Right?

    Thanks.
    as a new rider, in the new rider forum, you are flameproof to a degree, but really?
    If you are serious, and you are asking this question, then just maybe you should not be touching your braking system without a qualified or at least an experienced person there to instruct and or assist.... offer up a 6 pack of Stella, and you will likely get several volunteers to help teach you this....

    props for wanting to wrench your own ride, and for seeking assistance.

    don't be a Shervinn
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    Peewee and Kevin from Bayside should get together and start a bike shop called, Fuck you and the bike you rode in on.

  12. #11
    Chronic Array PRSmechanic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vstromgreg View Post
    as a new rider, in the new rider forum, you are flameproof to a degree, but really?
    If you are serious, and you are asking this question, then just maybe you should not be touching your braking system without a qualified or at least an experienced person there to instruct and or assist.... offer up a 6 pack of Stella, and you will likely get several volunteers to help teach you this....

    props for wanting to wrench your own ride, and for seeking assistance.
    I have to agree with this. There a few simple things you canget wrong that will make your brakes ineffective.
    And brake fluid will make a mess of your paint job if it sits there long enough.
    Can I sugeest that if you can't get the help you need to learn it properly, try it on the back brake first.
    It might not be rocket science, but don't turn yourself into a missle!
    chicken strips are a sign of intelligence
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  13. #12
    for the crumpet I suppose Array
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    Geebus people! The dude was carefully and correctly responding to the common usage of lazy jargon and imprecise techno-speak. He knew what bleeding meant. He just wanted to know if there was an additional process to "flush" his brake system, because someone used that term.

    And he wanted total clarification because... it is his brake system, and he understands the importance of getting it right!

    Holy fuck! Lay off, dick waggers.

    OP, when you are done bleeding, wash off everything with water (brake fluid is water soulible). Squeeze the brake lever. It should feel like good, firm brakes, not squishy at all. Hold the brake lever tight. It should stay put. Put the little rubber caps on your bleeder screws. Buy them, they are cheap. You are good to go.

    -don't overfill your reservoir, BTW. Half way between full and add.
    Last edited by dasein; 04-18-2012 at 09:30 AM.

  14. #13
    Chronic Array PRSmechanic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dasein View Post
    Geebus people! The dude was carefully and correctly responding to the common usage of lazy jargon and imprecise techno-speak. He knew what bleeding meant. He just wanted to know if there was an additional process to "flush" his brake system, because someone used that term.

    And he wanted total clarification because... it is his brake system, and he understands the importance of getting it right!

    Holy fuck! Lay off, dick waggers.

    OP, when you are done bleeding, wash off everything with water (brake fluid is water soulible). Squeeze the brake lever. It should feel like good, firm brakes, not squishy at all. Hold the brake lever tight. It should stay put. Put the little rubber caps on your bleeder screws. Buy them, they are cheap. You are good to go.

    -don't overfill your reservoir, BTW. Half way between full and add.
    Dick wagger?
    A bit much I think.
    I based my reponse on what he asked, what he probably knows, and the consequences if he guesses wrong.
    I didn't call him an idiot or anything else.
    In my amateur opinion the $20 he might save isn't worth it.
    Also, I think some ideas put forth are based on what YOU know, not what HE knows. To YOU it's simple. Maybe it is for him, maybe not.
    What's wrong with him getting some help? And somebody getting a few Stellas??

    Bleed bolts get seized. They can snap if muscled, or seep if pussied.
    Brakes can feel decent to someone who isn't sure, and become useless once hot and the air collects in the master.
    Does he know that when you squeeze the lever anything but slowly with the cover off, a shot of brake fluid will shoot up, and it usually lands on the fender.
    And if you wait an hour until your done to clean it off, there's a good chance it will take paint with it.
    chicken strips are a sign of intelligence
    unless you're at the track ;)

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  15. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanbc View Post
    What i mean to say is "when i bleed the brakes, is that the same thing as changing the fluid?"
    There is like no separate "change the brake fluid" job. Right?

    Thanks.
    To better answer your question, can you tell us why are you asking? Were you thinking about bleeding the brakes on your 2009 BMW F650GS? Or is it something else?

    Incidentally, I also make a clear distinction between bleeding the brakes, and a complete fluid change. Removing air molecules from the hydraulic circuit does not necessary require brake fluid be changed. For motorcycles, air molecules can be taken out of the hydraulic circuit without taking any fluid out of the system. However, for bicycles, one needs to bleed the reservoir too.

    For example, some brand new motorcycles coming off the showroom floor need their brakes bled because the lever feels unacceptably spongy, and thus would lose feel and power. I wouldn't change the brake fluid for this case. There is nothing wrong with the fluid. I would just take out the air molecules from the hydraulic circuit that are in and out of solution.

  16. #15
    Registered User Array bandito's Avatar
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    Go to Lordco and buy yourself a Mityvac. They are not very expensive. I have owned one for many years, used it many times to change fluids and bleed brakes... and is a very good item on the shelf for any motorcycle owner who wants to do maintenance on their bikes.

    It makes the job much easier and quicker, and less messy. At least for me.
    Long Live Shervin Of The North!

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