Changing brake fluid
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Thread: Changing brake fluid

  1. #1
    Registered User Array cvrle1's Avatar
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    Changing brake fluid

    I plan on changing front and rear brake fluid on the bike. Haven't done it since I got the bike last year, and I have no idea when it was changed by previous owner. I am also seeing that front one is a bit hazy and there are floaties in there. I also didnt notice that oil level for front went down at all during whole last season, so it may even be clogged (rear went down by about 1/3 or so). Definitely looks like time to change.

    I was looking at getting mityvac (8500)for this. Read a lot of good things about it, seems pretty easy and straight forward, and it generally got good reviews. I also read that people just use a big syringe for this, but that just seems like it can get really messy, really fast.

    Any hints how to do this as painlessly as possible? Any tips on what to do/not do? I know that air bubbles are a no no, but anything else I should be aware of? Any other ideas on tools to use (like mityvac or syringe)

    i still havent found a good how to for syringe that has pictures (or even a video) so if anyone could share that, it would be great.

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  3. #2
    Original Pirate Material Array TMR's Avatar
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    I got one of these: http://m.harborfreight.com/brake-ble...kit-69328.html

    It was cheap. Makes for quick and simple bleeds.

  4. #3
    corner worker Array solo soldier's Avatar
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    ^^^ the vaccum pump is the way to go.

    Totally painless after you have done it a few times, speed bleeders are a waste of time, so stay away from that.
    A note on vaccum pumps, don't buy the one with the plastic pump cylinder from lordco, complete garbage.
    Always use a new sealed bottle of brake fluid.
    And if your doing this on a ducati, ensure not to get any brake fluid on the paint....lol

    Oh and about every two years between changes, unless your racing the thing, then it might be a good idea to do it more often depending also on which DOT fluid your using.
    As Einstein stated: "All our lauded technological progress -- our very civilization -- is like the axe in the hand of the pathological criminal."

  5. #4
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    My bike is well known for having brake and clutch fluid change problems.

    Thank you op for starting this thread. Thank you TMR for your post.
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    Ride safe folks.

  6. #5
    Registered User Array cvrle1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TMR View Post
    I got one of these: http://m.harborfreight.com/brake-ble...kit-69328.html

    It was cheap. Makes for quick and simple bleeds.
    that is same as the mityvac I was thinking about. People compared the 2 and usually said that mityvac is better built, and works better between the 2. HF one has some pretty bad reviews in general unfortunately. But price is nice.

  7. #6
    Registered User Array 125cbr rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TMR View Post
    I got one of these: http://m.harborfreight.com/brake-ble...kit-69328.html

    It was cheap. Makes for quick and simple bleeds.
    I have tried those kits before. The hoses that it comes with never fits my bleeder screws. I always return the item. I just have a empty bottle with a hose on it. simply open the bleeder screw, squeeze the the lever. Continue until clean fluid comes out. In between pumping out fluid. Squeeze lever to build pressure. No need for fancy kits when most bikes are meant to be serviced by a kid in a shed.

  8. #7
    100% Asshole Array SpookyjacK's Avatar
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    Use a syringe without the needle obviously, remove the fluid in the reservoirs first. Fill with new fluid and bleed by hand until clear fluid comes through...why pump the old fluid through the whole system?

    If you do it this way there is less wastage and can be done in 20 minutes.

  9. #8
    Registered User Array 125cbr rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpookyjacK View Post
    Use a syringe without the needle obviously, remove the fluid in the reservoirs first. Fill with new fluid and bleed by hand until clear fluid comes through...why pump the old fluid through the whole system?

    If you do it this way there is less wastage and can be done in 20 minutes.
    why not just pump until theres nothing but air in the system. then there is no need for a syringe. the old fluid has been in there for awhile so its not going to do any more damage. just time. taking a syringe is only taking minutes off. you bleed until the reservoir is near empty than fill it up again. your only losing a few ml of new fluid when you flush it, which is pennies lost.

  10. #9
    100% Asshole Array SpookyjacK's Avatar
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    Why would you want air in the system? If you empty the reservoirs first then you only have to clear the old fluid in the lines...less pumping and work. I'm lazy and like to get things done quick.

  11. #10
    Registered User Array 125cbr rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpookyjacK View Post
    Why would you want air in the system? If you empty the reservoirs first then you only have to clear the old fluid in the lines...less pumping and work. I'm lazy and like to get things done quick.
    that is true. I am lazy too but when I want it squeaky clean I waste more fluid than the capacity of what the brake line and res is. at my job, I see trailer brakes that haven't been touched for ages. comes out like mud. I pump until air comes out. put new fluid in. flush it again to get all the air out and to get compression.

  12. #11
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    Avoiding air in any hydraulic system is very important.
    There are old riders and there are bold riders. There aren't any old, bold riders.

    Ride safe folks.

  13. #12
    Registered User Array 125cbr rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pea Souper View Post
    Avoiding air in any hydraulic system is very important.
    of course

  14. #13
    Beer League Racer/Asshole Array SnoDragon's Avatar
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    What spooky said! That's how I've always done it. Empty the master, then I usually take a q-tip and clean the edges inside (to make sure there is no gunk), then fill with new fluid, and flush. Usually only about 4 or 5 full pumps to the bar to flush through. For $20, speed bleeders make it even easier. Just keep pumping and filling! They are one-way valves that don't let air back in, so you don't have to close the valve each pump.
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  15. #14
    Registered User Array hayacruiser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpookyjacK View Post
    Use a syringe without the needle obviously, remove the fluid in the reservoirs first. Fill with new fluid and bleed by hand until clear fluid comes through...why pump the old fluid through the whole system?

    If you do it this way there is less wastage and can be done in 20 minutes.
    Agreed, I replaced the lines on my track bike just yesterday and used a mityvac I bought on ebay for cheap...all work done in less than an hour, easy peasy...OP, if you need to borrow the vac, no problemo...

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnoDragon View Post
    What spooky said! That's how I've always done it. Empty the master, then I usually take a q-tip and clean the edges inside (to make sure there is no gunk), then fill with new fluid, and flush. Usually only about 4 or 5 full pumps to the bar to flush through. For $20, speed bleeders make it even easier. Just keep pumping and filling! They are one-way valves that don't let air back in, so you don't have to close the valve each pump.
    I installed speed bleeders also, great time/trouble saver.

    My bike is famous for being a bitch to get air out of the lines.
    There are old riders and there are bold riders. There aren't any old, bold riders.

    Ride safe folks.

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