Michelin Pilot Race H2's
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Thread: Michelin Pilot Race H2's

  1. #1
    Registered User Array evo-blade's Avatar
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    Michelin Pilot Race H2's

    Hey guys... just wanted to get some info from the racing group on the Michelin H2's. Do you guys recommend this tire strictly for the track or is it a good tire for the road also?!?!


    Thanks for the input

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  3. #2
    tchan748
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    H2s are not race tires. They are more like race replicas like the 207RR. But the H2s are so good that you can actually race them too. I don't recommand them for everyday rding on the street unless you are not going to ride in the rain or in colder weather.

  4. #3
    BST Prospect Array Racer-Sherm's Avatar
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    these tires are only super sticky when road/track temperatures are HOT.... it's kind of a waste if you use them for street riding IMO... you end up heat cycling them too much and they become hockey pucks.....
    BST Racing

  5. #4
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    I've seen first hand the results of Pilot race tires. When hot they are fine but they are more cold blooded than many of the rest until they come up to temp. One race school pupil droppe their bike TWICE in the same day at Tradex thanks to not quite being able to get them hot enough. And this particular pupil was one of the more aggresive and faster riders that day. Frankly I wouldn't buy them for myself after seeing that performance.

    For that matter I've heard about the Pilot Sport street tires reflecting this as well on colder days. They seem to take a lot to get them warm and they can put you on yer butt really quick when cold unlike many others that are more forgiving over a wider range but may not have the ultimate grip under battle.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  6. #5
    Nasty Bossman
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    I was checking out "Bike" magazine and they had a tire shootout in their June issue. The Pilot Sports came out on top. Can't remember the other rankings but the BT012's (which I like) came out second last. Take this with a grain of salt; I assume tires will feel different on different bikes. They did the test on a GSX-R1000.

    Edit: btw I don't think they did any wet testing... so I'd imagine that you would have to take that into account for street riding too. They also did a thorough two lap warm-up on a circuit before testing.

  7. #6
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Part of what must be factored in is the normal temperature of the area you ride in. In the magazine's case I wouldn't be surprised if it's in Cali or in Nevada at the Willow Springs course where it's a lot warmer than around here. High track temps will really help to mask a tire's possible cold blooded warmup traits. Not saying the magazine was wrong but I've heard more than one story about guys wiping out on the Pilots that weren't fully warmed. YMMV of course but I think it's important to factor in a certain amount of local climate effect.

    As an example I've seen many storys blasting the Dunlop 207's for getting too hot and turning greasy on street rides through canyons. I managed to do that to mine but it took 15 minutes on the track at Mission. Something I would NEVER expect to encounter on the street or during any sort of non suicidal canyon session. But then when I looked at where these people were riding is was all much lower in the States where the temps were much hotter during the riding season than around here.

    Based on this I'd rather trust a British tire test than one done in California in the summer. The British climate being much closer to ours should make the results more applicable to our case.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  8. #7
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    These tires probably warm up slightly faster than than the medium race compound Michelins, but they are still very spooky in cool temperatures. Two quick fellows I know said they liked the rears but were pushing the fronts, in fact, one pushed it too far on his nice yellow Mille at Spokane just recently. I believe someone who should know told me the H's appeared to be softer than the M's and would not hold up as well to hard track thrashing on a warm day. I got two long track days with our group (PSSR) and had no problems with these (H's) as long as the tires had a good three laps of gradually picking up the pace. On the third track day on the H's, I had the longest, fastest(100mph+)slide I've ever had. Very smooth at the time, but not something I want to make a practice of. Too many heat cycles, I'd say.
    Last edited by pkaustin; 06-24-2003 at 03:40 PM.

  9. #8
    Mr. Red
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    Quik Question pkaustin. What would you recommend for riding Seatlle/Portland. I ride an RC51. I do plan on riding street and track. My stock Metzeler have 5500kms(3500miles) and two track days on them and I want new one for the 9th.
    Thanks for your help!

  10. #9
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    tires

    Sorry for the delay, usually I get a notification. Given the amount of miles you've gotten out of your current tires, I'd steer you towards some good, high performance street tires over race tires. Race tires can offer less traction if they're not running in the right temperature zone. Most of the race-type tires also have little tread which is good on a dry track; not so good for wet riding.

    I've read good things and have some fairly quick buds on the Metzler Sportecs, both those and the Pirelli Diablos are plenty sticky enough for most C and B level riders and will be a better street tire - more miles out of them too.

    I'm sure Dunlop 208s and Bridgestone BT 12SS(?) or whatever would be fine as well. I'm just more familiar with the Pirelli/Metzler line. That's what we are running and they seem to be towards the top on most shoot-outs.
    Last edited by pkaustin; 06-27-2003 at 06:59 AM.

  11. #10
    VPR
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    out of curiosity .....what do you use as the rating for the tire?

    how do you come up with the correct tire pressure to use?

    for my total tire information I go off of what the tire tempurature is.

    alot of people that i have come across still go by what the bike has down for the correct tire pressure to use.

    ball park for me is use about 10% increase in tire pressure when the tire is used and hot!

    it has to be checked almost the second you stop to get the most accurate pressure.

    for racing we usually do a tire heat test to check where it is at.

    tire pressure we can also test when the bike is in the pits and the tire warmers have been on for a while...half hour plus....

    just my thoughts.......

    let me know if there are other ideas......

  12. #11
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    tires

    Graham,

    I'm afraid I can't tell you anything you don't already know. I haven't gotten that technical with tire pressures since I stopped racing.

    Down here (Portland) for track days, I run a Pirelli SC1 front, SC-2 rear, set it 30-30 and forget about it. (I have bumped up the rear pressure a bit in the past on a hot day when it was getting too squirmy.) I'm on and off the track so much pulling students around, I don't bother with warmers, and probably don't get them up to full temp until later in the day when I get in some free-riding.

    What we have noticed, and what my point was, that some of the race tires we've run can be very treacherous while riding around with the C-group riders in the morning. A few instructors have had 'moments', some big ones, in this situaton. So we steer riders away from race tires uniil they get quick enough to heat them.
    Last edited by pkaustin; 06-27-2003 at 08:50 AM.

  13. #12
    Wanna come over for lunch Array ehtaylor's Avatar
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    Warning h2 front not for track days

    Down in Spokane on Monday I used H2's front and rear.
    The rear was fine but the front was too hard.
    No shit, in turn 2 I slid the front 10 feet, the tyre was howling. I was crashed but somehow jumped on the outside footpeg and it came back.
    Use a soft on the front!
    Bring it on Fatboy

  14. #13
    Registered User Array PEA's Avatar
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    something reD...
    I have a pilot race front. How can I tell which compound it is?
    2002 998

  15. #14
    Wanna come over for lunch Array ehtaylor's Avatar
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    H2 is hard , M2 is Medium , S2 is soft
    Bring it on Fatboy

  16. #15
    NICKDOG
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    I'm new here but I thought I'd offer an opinion.

    H2s are halfway between Pilot Sports (street tires) and the M2, S2 full race tires. They are harder than the S2s but NOT as hard as the M2s.
    They are a very high performance street tire but are better served as a track day tire. They are useless in the wet as they are 'slicked' on the edges. They will definitely not last as long as Pilot Sports but they do offer great grip and they heat up far faster than previous generation Pilots (both sport and race) For a street tire just get a street compound like the Sports, or Metz Sportec M1s or The Diablos.

    For the track, the H2 rear is very capable and will last 3 track days for sure. The front H2 is another story. I just don't like it. It begins to push way too soon if you ask me. I recommend the S2 front with an H2 rear.

    For a big tire eating bike like the RC51, an M2 rear and an S2 front is an excellent combination.

    Like I said, you guys don't know me but that's my experience anyway.

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