Camless Engine...
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Thread: Camless Engine...

  1. #1
    Liquid72
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    Camless Engine...

    Hey people I was reading an article in Performance Bikes...Lotus Engineering has developed an engine that doesnt have any cams...means no big ass heavy cylinder heads. Its called A.V.T which stands for Active Valve Train.. A deal was signed with the american company Eaton Automotive to mass produce the motor. If this finds its way into the motorcycle world man we are in for a treat. Can you imagine a 250 pound 200 horse power street bike ..Woooooo. Keep your eyes open for more info this is the way of the future.

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  3. #2
    rain? whats that! Array REVELATIONS's Avatar
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    Electronic cams?

    KOOL!!


  4. #3
    Registered User Array BMR's Avatar
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    2 strokes

  5. #4
    Liquid72
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    well I guess it would be a 2 stroke but with out the burning of oil in the fuel..and the need for expansion chambers yadayada !!

  6. #5
    carlitos
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    I did see an experimental engine with no valve train. In fact there was just two cams that acted as a valve. Sort of a like a hollow cam with holes that acted as a valve. The problem is, you guessed, sealing.

    But i was wondering why not use a rotary type valve. since wankel engine technology results in good sealing. I mean, it would more compact, with fewer parts, much lighter and with no valve flote

  7. #6
    370HSSV-O773H Array arcrz's Avatar
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    It would`nt be a 2-stroke if its got a valve train.Sounds more like its a standard Four stroke with a really funky valvetrain.How are the Valves actuated? Electronically?Is there an online article?
    Hug a two stroke....you`ll never go back to trees.

  8. #7
    _____________ Array iceneweb's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Liquid72
    well I guess it would be a 2 stroke but with out the burning of oil in the fuel..and the need for expansion chambers yadayada !!
    why does is have to be a 2 stroke? AFAIK it's a four stroke where the valves are operated by something other than a traditional cam. they're probably electrically operated.

    here's the engineering website:

    http://www.lotuseng.com/template.cfm?name=home

    they do loads of behind the scenes engineering for other manufacturers and race teams. i didn't find the valve train info though.

    sidenote: mark gardiner who sometimes writes for performance bikes (a uk mag) is from lil old vancouver, bc . . . . . .
    Last edited by iceneweb; 12-11-2003 at 07:00 PM.

  9. #8
    Liquid72
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    The valves are controlled by a computer that opens the valve only the needed amount depending on throttle position , temp etc... a cam engine opens the valve to max duration of the cam profile which is great for top end power but not good for low end grunt. This will give us the torque of big a vtwin and the top end power of a GSXR 1000 .... like an electric motor Smoooooth...Plus awesome fuel economy...Not sure about your rides but my Gixxer LOVES GAS STATIONS !!

  10. #9
    Registered User Array
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    This type of thing is one of many reasons that auto makers want to go to 48volt electric systems. You could then develop soliniods to accuate the valves rather than cams. Another idea that I have heard tossed around is pneumatic cams. Air pressure would accutate the cams. This also gets rid of all the spinning metal.

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  11. #10
    Registered User Array marksport's Avatar
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    I wonder how reliable solenoids are for this kind of duty cycle in the long term?

  12. #11
    Stupid bastard Array Hu99's Avatar
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    Originally posted by carlitos
    But i was wondering why not use a rotary type valve. since wankel engine technology results in good sealing.
    Suzuki tried that. It damn near ruined them.
    What was it all about?

  13. #12
    Stupid bastard Array Hu99's Avatar
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    This is a good idea in principle, but is still in the hands of American engineers, meaning lack of reliability and probably too much unneccessary weight. I'll wait until the Japanese take the idea and make the most of it.
    What was it all about?

  14. #13
    Registered User Array
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    I was reading about a ducati V-4 engine that was running at super-high rpms. There was a casual remark in the article about ducati avoiding the complication of pneumatic cams. Maybe we'll getr lucky and the euro guys will be involved.
    -Sandworm
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  15. #14
    AdventureR Array BELDAR's Avatar
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    Anyone else here into F1 car tech??? Notice how some new valve actuation system always seem to come along every few years and then disappear. I think the last real advances that actually made a big difference were the Pneumatic Valve by Renault in the 1980's and the Honda V-TEC variable valve timing from the late 80's.

    From what I've read, almost every engine builder involved in current F1 is doing R&D on some sort of camless engine; it being capable of infinite variable valve timing, lift and duration. The Lotus AVT is supposedly hydraulically operated. Have also read about hydraulic (opening) - pneumatic (closing) systems and electro-magnetic actuation systems being tested. Be fun when these technologies make it into a motorcycle.

    The Rotary valve or Poppet valve have been around for awhile. Don't think its ever been implemented in a vehicle engine with great results. Anyone know of otherwise??? I think that design may be better suited for use in engines that operate in a constant revs.

    Anyway, for those techies out there here are two of my fav sites.

    www.scarbsf1.com
    www.engineeringtalk.com
    Last edited by BELDAR; 12-12-2003 at 05:32 AM.

  16. #15
    James
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    Originally posted by Hu99
    Suzuki tried that. It damn near ruined them.
    Re5? it was a rotary engine in that case, no rotary valve system.

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