Riding 2 up
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Thread: Riding 2 up

  1. #1
    Joe Rocket Array Joseph's Avatar
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    Apr 2004
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    Cloverdale
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    90 CB-1

    Riding 2 up

    Hi I had my first experience riding with a passenger! Wow, I never considered how different it was!

    I need some tips though!

    Ok, what's the best way for the passenger to be holding on? I found it was nice (reassuring) to have the passenger holding onto my waist, since I could feel where they were laterally, and how they were taking my shifting/turning.

    however, there is also the rear handle, should that be used during braking? maybe with one hand?

    My passenger (who's been on a few bikes.. not too many) liked putting her hands on the tank... so not really holding onto me... I didn't like that as much since I couldn't "feel" how secure she was.

    Hmm... And I Found that I was soo stiff I gotta get used to that! and do you guys always 2 foot at stops, I found I was... just so much more weight to tip

    oh well, any tips would be great!

    oh yeah, and I forget, so when you're doing a turn that requires lean, what should I tell the passenger to do, helmet on the side of the lean?

    Thanks!

    -Joseph

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  3. #2
    Devil's Advocate Array RoadBlur's Avatar
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    Suzuki XV 2182
    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph
    Hi I had my first experience riding with a passenger! Wow, I never considered how different it was!

    I need some tips though!

    Ok, what's the best way for the passenger to be holding on? I found it was nice (reassuring) to have the passenger holding onto my waist, since I could feel where they were laterally, and how they were taking my shifting/turning.


    however, there is also the rear handle, should that be used during braking? maybe with one hand?


    My passenger (who's been on a few bikes.. not too many) liked putting her hands on the tank... so not really holding onto me... I didn't like that as much since I couldn't "feel" how secure she was.
    I like it when they use the tank because their arms are still around you incase something unsettles the bike or you accelerate and catch them off guard, grab handles just don't seem all that stable to me, when people do those it always looks like they're setting up to do a backflip off the bike. Using the tank also seems to let them control their upper body better so they don't get thrown forward and smack lids.

    Hmm... And I Found that I was soo stiff I gotta get used to that! and do you guys always 2 foot at stops, I found I was... just so much more weight to tip
    You'll be stiffer because you will wind up taking their weight somewhat under braking.. a combination of them sliding into you and bracing with their arms. I try to find that happy medium where her arms aren't toast and my back ain't either. My favorite passenger uses her arms a lot but leans on me a bit going down hill to help her out, but never throws so much weight onto me that I'm going to have to be bracing on the bars and unable to steer effectively. If she gets sore arms she starts leaning more but warns me first.

    And yeah I put 2 feet down always with a passenger, and a nice wide stance to brace the bike better.

    oh well, any tips would be great!

    oh yeah, and I forget, so when you're doing a turn that requires lean, what should I tell the passenger to do, helmet on the side of the lean?

    Thanks!

    -Joseph
    The good passengers I've ridden with keep their body in line with mine and thats whats most important (pretty much just stay still and don't shift around and cause the bike to unsettle, since I don't shift around like I might when riding alone). When they have their arms around you and just go with the flow, it feels more like you're 1 bigger mass on the bike and not two doing different things.. much more stable than if they squirm this way and that.

    Head position I can't see mattering but probably will naturally be looking over your inside shoulder if they want to see where you're going.
    -=Graduate: Dragon Driving School=-

    Raise your pitch forks in the air, shake 'em like ya just don't care!

  4. #3
    MMMMMMM......TWINS!! Array blake easton's Avatar
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    Jun 2003
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    13 kawi 636
    I find that using more rear brake when slowing down helps a bit. Also, when your stoping have them put there hands on the tank. It helps so U dont have to hold there weight when your stoping. And the last trick is to get them to hold on when your moving just so that if you need to make a sudden "on throttle" twist of the wrist she doesnt fall back. Hope this helps.

  5. #4
    Registered User Array
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    i agree with mr. murphy and blake. the best way is for the passenger to put their hands on the tank. it gives the passenger more control and gives you as thr rider more control, space and flexibility to do your own thing. there is both room for you and the passenger's own control and actions, which will result to lesser chances of possible riding "mess ups/mishaps" or wind blockage. plus, this way, the passenger isn't gonna "suffocate" you either.

    yeah, get your passenger to pretty much lean and turn its head the same way as you are, kind of like being your shadow or silhouette. like mr. murphy wrote:

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Murphy
    Head position I can't see mattering but probably will naturally be looking over your inside shoulder if they want to see where you're going.
    better to go with 2 foot down when taking up a passenger. you're going to be taking the responsibility of that one extra rider too.

    good luck and have fun riding!

  6. #5
    Nite Rider Array Shimmer's Avatar
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    Honda NC19
    I think I do like 80% of my riding 2 up. Yeah there are a few things you have to get used to when it's your first time taking a passenger on the bike

    I think most people have pointed out a few good things already so I'll just try to add some more tips from personal experience.

    -Never let the passenger use those dumb grab rails. It throws the bike a little off balance because there are two weights on it (you and the passenger). When your passenger is holding on to you it's much easier to control.
    -Tell your passenger not to fidget around when you are coming to a stop. I've had a few passengers start moving around, begin sitting upright, or stretching out a bit as I slow down to stop. The problem is I haven't stopped yet. You know how it's harder to balance the bike when you're moving slowly? Well it's a lot harder when there's somebody behind you moving around.
    -Warn your passengers to keep their shoes off the exhausts. That shit is hard to scrape off of the exhausts.
    -Let your passenger wave to other riders instead of doing it yourself. Most of the passengers I've had love doing this.
    SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING : Quitting 2-Stroking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Other People's Health.

  7. #6
    The good days... Array Deputy's Avatar
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    A ---> B
    I've found that with my gf, she prefers to hold on to my waist, although I wish she'd do one hand on the tank and one on my waist - particularly for braking.

    When we were coming home from Hatzic in the evening a few weeks ago, it was chilly so I had the heated grips turned on to high, but due to the extra pressure of her sliding into me in the one or two harder stops and just the stops in general, I ended up "burning" my hands - the palms were basically red like a sunburn for about a day.

    I've only ridden as a passenger once to speak of (other than once when I was a kid) and I found I preferred the one hand on the tank and one hand on the waist. I liked this because I found I had the best of both worlds this way - I could brace for a stop and I could feel comfortable on takeoff.

    I've also found that the best way for the passenger to "turn" with you is just to look over your shoulder in the direction of the turn and in doing so, this gives just the right amount of weight shift to go along with your movements. I actually have to tell my gf not to lean quite so much because there was one turn where she was leaning enough that I basically had to stay straight up to counteract her lean, I think she was just getting into it a little too much, heh.

    2 feet on the ground is more comfortable.

    Shimmer's dead on with the no fidgeting thing, I hate that - and the exhaust. My gf lost the bottom part of her heels on the boots she was wearing before she got proper riding boots on my exhaust. Stinky.
    Bike's sold - still have some gear left!

  8. #7
    Registered User Array
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    good point Shimmer. Joseph, tell your passenger not to sit fully upright until you and the bike have come to a full stop at the intersection. it interferes with the wave/aerodynamics, thus the bike's motion.

  9. #8
    I do all my own stunts Array boarder's Avatar
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    IM gonna put in my two cents. I've done a fair bit of two up riding, but only until recently was it with a good passenger.

    She sat still, biggest, most important factor. You are giving her a ride, not the bike, don't let them figit around when slowing down, or starting off.

    Leaning is not necesary, generally i get them to put their head on the inside of the corner, and any leaning they'll be doing is subliminal...meaning its what she's supposed to be doing without trying. If you don't expect them to lean, and they do, you may notice that your lane position has changed.

    Also, take note of the little things that have been posted, rear brake and putting both feet down. Their wrists will love you for putting the rear brake to use, and both feet down in case they decide to shift their wieght around.

    One last point, back and neck rubs are totally expected on longer rides, passenger should be briefed before departing.
    anyone wanna lend me a bike ?

  10. #9
    Free R. Kelly! Array vincenzo888's Avatar
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    i do all the same practises too. also though, have some signals set between you too, that way your passenger knows. i give a quick double tap on the leg when i'm gonna start opening up the bike. then she holds on tight and tucks her head down. but she also sometimes already knows (ie) when a passing lane appears, she knows it's time to hang on.

  11. #10
    More than meets the eye Array Pvt. BLOGGINS's Avatar
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    2004 Katana 750, 1992 GS500
    Talk to your passenger before, and make sure that you work out signals for say when you are stopped and about to go, when you are about to give it, or if you are about to turn.
    Tell them to sit still and don't fidgit... and make sure to have fun

  12. #11
    Born to sweep. Array r1100s's Avatar
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    Hey Joseph!

    I've always told my passengers to lean with me, like a shadow, and advised them to otherwise sit still. If they do this, then its almost as if they are not there. Tell them that their fidgeting can actually steer the bike, that tends to keep them still.

    You can use a lot more rear brake when you have a passenger on, since there's more weight on the back wheel. For maximum stopping with a passenger, more rear brake is needed.

    Also make sure that they know to wait for your signal to mount and dismount, its really easy to drop the bike if you're not ready for them to hop on or off.

    And ask them to pay attention - they do need to pay some attention, especially with regard to stopping, as some means of bracing is in order. If find bracing on the tank is the best. My wife did actually drift off to sleep on the S2S once, the only way I could tell was the helmet-banging. This can't be good, so ask them to stay awake too!

    If your passenger slides into you, which was a huge problem on my bike (and very hard on the family jewels as they was crushed against the tank!), get some of that black nonslip perforated rubber stuff from Canadian tire and wrap it around the passenger seat. Keeps 'em stuck in place, a big improvement over a sliding passenger, and reduces the need for bracing against the tank etc.
    Transportation is serious business.

  13. #12
    Registered User Array VipeRVenoM's Avatar
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    Any tips to help from the helmets clashing together. Went 2 up for my first time and her helmet kept hitting mine, and my palms were so sore from having to brace for her too.
    DOOBY DOOBY DOO

  14. #13
    I do all my own stunts Array boarder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VipeRVenoM
    Any tips to help from the helmets clashing together. Went 2 up for my first time and her helmet kept hitting mine, and my palms were so sore from having to brace for her too.

    I don't wanna sound like an ass, but you have to learn how to shift smoothly. The only time I bump heads is over bumps. Rev match on down shifts.
    anyone wanna lend me a bike ?

  15. #14
    Joe Rocket Array Joseph's Avatar
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    Wow, thanks guys for all that advice, that'll totally help!

    things that I hadn't considered:

    Using more rear brake, that'll help with the helmet hitting too

    one hand tank one hand aroudn waist... this'll help even more with the helmet hitting, as well as knowing where they are.

    No fidgeting... yeah no doubt... that's probably a lot of the reason why I was so stiff... trying to keep the bike as firm as possible.

    Hand signals sound handy, I prolly don't need one about the "opening up the bike" 2 up, my bike feels like a 50cc, ha! but it's still fun!

    Making sure they're paying attention for braking and not falling asleep also sounds like good stuff to remind em! (Hey again R1100S!)

    well I've gotta try this stuff out now!

    hey one more thing... is it bad if the passenger has a nicer helmet than the rider? he he, it's not fair I say!

    -Joseph

  16. #15
    The good days... Array Deputy's Avatar
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    A ---> B
    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph
    hey one more thing... is it bad if the passenger has a nicer helmet than the rider? he he, it's not fair I say!

    -Joseph
    Just remember who the one with the bike is.
    Bike's sold - still have some gear left!

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