Any tips for avoiding rear-enders?
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Thread: Any tips for avoiding rear-enders?

  1. #1
    shameless poser Array dog44's Avatar
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    Question Any tips for avoiding rear-enders?

    Hi. I’ve always been paranoid about getting rear-ended, a very healthy fear IMHO.

    Actually, I’ve got 3 questions, all related.

    Q1: On my previous 2 bikes I don’t recall having any trouble seeing behind me, but on my new bike I’m having difficulty. I guess the problem is the same on any racing-style bike that requires an aggressive riding position. Seems the only time I get a good look is during a left-sweeper when I tuck in my elbow. I must be missing something, it shouldn’t be this hard ... any suggestions?

    Q2: I read here that there was a good post on rear-ender avoidance (by Cosworth???). Anyway, I couldn’t find it. Could someone please point me to it, or just volunteer their own strategies?

    Q3: A specific situation that has me concerned: An amber light at that awkward moment, perhaps a cager behind, perhaps one oncoming and waiting to turn left. To Brake or Not To Brake?

    Thanks heaps in advance.
    Dog.

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  3. #2
    MMMMMMM......TWINS!! Array blake easton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dog44
    Hi. I’ve always been paranoid about getting rear-ended, a very healthy fear IMHO.

    Actually, I’ve got 3 questions, all related.

    Q1: On my previous 2 bikes I don’t recall having any trouble seeing behind me, but on my new bike I’m having difficulty. I guess the problem is the same on any racing-style bike that requires an aggressive riding position. Seems the only time I get a good look is during a left-sweeper when I tuck in my elbow. I must be missing something, it shouldn’t be this hard ... any suggestions?

    Q2: I read here that there was a good post on rear-ender avoidance (by Cosworth???). Anyway, I couldn’t find it. Could someone please point me to it, or just volunteer their own strategies?

    Q3: A specific situation that has me concerned: An amber light at that awkward moment, perhaps a cager behind, perhaps one oncoming and waiting to turn left. To Brake or Not To Brake?

    Thanks heaps in advance.
    Dog.
    1) I have my mirrors adjusted so I see abit of my elbows. when I check my mirrors I tilt my head a bit and pull in the elbow as well. It works for me and I can see alot.

    2)Ahh rear enders. Check your mirrors obviously. Keep on the brake, Or even flash it a few times if someone is coming up behind you. Keep it in gear if nobody is behind you. So if the person is coming up fast you can always quickly go ahead to aviod the collision or lessin it if you get hit.

    3) Depends on the situation. If there is someone turning left in front of you I would brake. its really a tough call. This kind of situation is one of the most common accidents. If you brake you can always brake close to the yellow line or white line. Your very small so if the car slams on the brakes as well a small amount of steering input should make it easy to NOT hit you.

    hopefully this helps. Ride safe

  4. #3
    Ghost SV Rider Array Dru's Avatar
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    Personally, if you're afraid of a rear-ender, you don't have faith in other drivers. Can't blame you. The first major tip is to alway flash your brake lights. Best yet, find a cool brake light modulator that'll strobe the light a few times before being steady. I saw a guy from this board with it, but didn't get a chance to ask about it.

    When moving, if you always use your brakes, rather than engine brake, don't worry too much. Be more concerned with the cars in front. It's more important. Blind faith sucks, but it's even worse if it's your fault. From my limited experience, I find it best that if you have to brake hard, brake harder than needed, and let off a bit towards the end. That way, anyone behind you guesses you'll stop sooner than you plan to. Also goes well when someone is tailgating you.

    As said, when at a stop light, keep the bike in gear and flash your brake lights. I tend to take glances every few seconds to see if there is a car coming up behind me. Easier when stopped. If I see one, I start to flash the brakes until they are nearly stopped. Only then would I consider popping it into N to rest the clutch hand.

    Avoid running any Amber lights whenever possible. I know from experience.

  5. #4
    glowing ghostie! Array gordopolis's Avatar
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    You should always have a good idea of where cars are around you. Use your mirrors, position yourself safely ie. not in someone's blind spot.

    When you stop, SHOULDER CHECK! Be prepared to get out of someone's way if you don't think they are going to stop behind you. That means pointing your bike in a direction where you can escape. Leave some space in between you and the car in front (1.5 car lengths?) so that you can pull forward if necessary.

    Flashing the brake light is an excellent idea too.

  6. #5
    rain? whats that! Array REVELATIONS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dru
    Personally, if you're afraid of a rear-ender, you don't have faith in other drivers. Can't blame you. The first major tip is to alway flash your brake lights. Best yet, find a cool brake light modulator that'll strobe the light a few times before being steady. I saw a guy from this board with it, but didn't get a chance to ask about it.
    I got one..........works great with the LED strip light.



  7. #6
    pronounced as-wee-pay Array effenay's Avatar
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    Q1: Try using a pair stick-on convex mirrors, available at Canadian Tire for $3. They work great for providing visibility at a variety of riding positions.

    Q2: As mentioned above, flash your brake lights, even after you're stopped.

    Q3: If you ride slow on the street, this situation will pop up far less often.

    Hope this helps!

  8. #7
    ridenrain
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    When you stop, try to hug the line as close as you can.
    The driver behind can see the car in front and the cars brake lights
    You get better visability and a way out if you need it
    IF you get hit, the bike and you might not get squished between the 2 cars
    .. and watch you're mirrors.

    There is no solution to those fast stops on red lights, except for better police enforcement. Assholes who tailgate bikes are a definate hazard and sometimes it's better to run a light than to risk getting crunched.

  9. #8
    More filling! Array stily1's Avatar
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    Nice, but you've covered your registration sticker!

    Quote Originally Posted by REVELATIONS
    I got one..........works great with the LED strip light.


  10. #9
    Moderator Array Shovelhead's Avatar
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    If I had the choice of Hitting a left turn car or being rear ended.
    I'd choose the rear ender. 100% the other guy's fault
    It's the lesser of the two evils

  11. #10
    Architeuthis
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    Worried about getting hit from behind? First, ride faster!!!

    Move around in the lane, give yourself room in front (you can use this for the guy behind to brake in), and always have an out.

  12. #11
    Still defying gravity... Array Thumper 8's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dog44

    Q1: On my previous 2 bikes I don’t recall having any trouble seeing behind me, but on my new bike I’m having difficulty. I guess the problem is the same on any racing-style bike that requires an aggressive riding position. Seems the only time I get a good look is during a left-sweeper when I tuck in my elbow. I must be missing something, it shouldn’t be this hard ... any suggestions?


    Thanks heaps in advance.
    Dog.

    You can also get mirror extenders that bolt on to base of the mirrors and push the mirrors out another inch or so - I have seen them on a VFR and they looked stock but made a big difference according to the rider - I threw a leg over the bike and even stationary, I could notice a big difference.
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  13. #12
    Mortgage Pimp Array J_Scott's Avatar
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    I'm just here for the intelligent conversation.
    Also, always be in LP1 in stop and go traffic, I know this is the norm but I thought I'd mention it. If we move over to the right then you're not right in front of the driver and they forget about you.

    I got bumped into once when I was getting ready to split traffic on the right side...

  14. #13
    Born to sweep. Array r1100s's Avatar
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    Stop at a slight angle in the lane, to make the length of the bike more visible and "bigger". I have heard that motor officers are trained to do this. Also it can assist in providing an escape route, if you're already pointing a bit to one side or another it will be easier to squirt out of a potential rear-ender's way (if you can't go straight forward e.g. when there's a car in front).

    Stop with an escape route in mind.

    I have 1 convex stick-on mirror on my left mirror, it helps a little, worth a try.
    Transportation is serious business.

  15. #14
    shameless poser Array dog44's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by r1100s
    Stop at a slight angle in the lane ... it can assist in providing an escape route
    This is an old thread, but yeah, I thought of that one. It also makes it VERY easy to watch for somebody about to nail you from behind.

  16. #15
    Gear Driven Cams Array Spike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shovelhead
    If I had the choice of Hitting a left turn car or being rear ended. I'd choose the rear ender. 100% the other guy's fault.
    Actually, hitting a left-turning car is 100% the other guy's fault, but you have to live through it in order to make a claim.
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