when drywalling walls do cabinets......
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: when drywalling walls do cabinets......

  1. #1
    Entertainment Poster Guy Array rearwheelrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Da Village
    Bike
    05 750 gixxer (no,seriously)

    when drywalling walls do cabinets......

    ....have to be removed/installed before the drywall goes up , or can they be done after?


    I'm wanting to get on with some renovations around the place.
    all the walls need to be updated for fire code purposes in a rental unit i've got. (insert trailer jokes here )

    I know i could ask the drywall guy about this, but i thought i'd get a heads up before i talked to him, and just have some thought to chew on.

    So... right now there's cabinets fixed to walls with that old school 1/8 wood pattern shit. is the drywaller likely to drywall around the cabinets, or want them taken down and drywall the whole wall, thus mounting the cabinets to the wall after?

    i'm all ears.
    thanks.

    Rdub
    RICHES BEFORE BITCHES

    People who never do any more than they get paid for never get paid for any more than they do.
    – Albert Hubbard

  2. #2
    Registered User Array
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Nordel
    Bike
    03 SV650S/DR350E
    I'd be taking the cabinets down first.
    It will look better finished, and it will be easier for the drywaller to board and tape.
    Just my ...
    RIP Julia, our shining light

  3. #3
    hoochie
    Guest
    OK... I have done countless rennovations and new home drywall and firestop installation. I was a foreman of a crew of drywallers for a few years before leaving the trade... ( pusuit of bigger career goals..lol)
    So I know exactley what you need to know.
    The cabinets will have to come down first. Depending on your existing drywall, your ceiling may also have to come down. Firestopping ( firebarriers) is all done within the walls and ceilings. It is to ensure that your unit and the unit next to yours are seperated in case of fire. If one unit has a fire, it is a preventative measure to help insure that both units do not go up in flames. ( you may have already known that).
    The finished firestopping is not seen when the finish drywall has been completed. It is all behind the walls and withing the ceiling.
    As far as your cabinets being on the walls... NO. They have to come down. The wood panneling has to come down too. All light switch covers, window trim, door trim etc has to be removed prior to boarding.The board ( drywall) behind the cabinets will have to be redone. Think of it as if you were painting the wall, and you had a dresser there. Would you stop and not paint behind the dresser? The drywall has to be complete. All fixtures, cabinets, window and door trim etc... goes on after the baording and taping has been completed.
    At this point, I would also suggest that you consider the space you have, and think about any changes you may want to make as far as room size or adding a closet etc. If you have a small room you want to be made bigger, or a big room you want divided... consider those things before you have the renovation started. The walls can be moved and you can get the most out of your space. But... If you have a wall that is " load bearing"... it should not be moved. Load bearing walls are usually the ones that run the length of your unit.
    **** this next part is of major importance******
    Ensure that you have any and all plumbing and electrical improvements and or changes made prior to having the walls boarded. If you decide you want to move a light switch, or need an extra light somewhere... get it done prior to having the board put up.
    Inspections must be done prior to having the finish drywaller do his thing. If the drywaller goes ahead without the inspectors' approval.... the inspector may ask to have the drywall removed so they can see the firestopping, to ensure it is up to code. This is very important.
    There may need to be some caulking done as well. This ensures that the unit above is seperate from the one below and the one on the right s seperated from the one on the left... You know like in an appartment.
    If you have any other questions or concerns.. let me know. I'd be glad to help out.
    Last edited by hoochie; 01-05-2005 at 05:05 AM.

  4. #4
    I'm napping Array psyclone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    North Vancouver
    Bike
    Suzuki SV650, 2002
    Here is a question for you Hoochie. I recently put in a new shower faucet. My shower wall with the faucet is the back of someone elses appartment wall. To make room for my new faucet I had to cut away the existing gyprock. I then used one of those large cover plates to cover the hole since my old and new faucets were different sizes. Is there any firestoping that I should be putting in there? I wasn't sure and I've been looking around for an answer. Hope you can help.

    Thanks
    Darnell
    -
    -
    Current:Suzuki SV650, 2002
    Previous:69 Triumph 500, 71 BSA lightning, 73 Triumph Trident, Yamaha DT125, 85 Honda Nighthawk, 88 Harley Sportster, CB 900...hmm I think thats it

  5. #5
    Entertainment Poster Guy Array rearwheelrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Da Village
    Bike
    05 750 gixxer (no,seriously)
    OOOOhhhh! good question. i bet having a shower faucet right against your wall would be a piss off , if you were the neighbour!

    Look at this, HOOCHIE! : You could have your own "Hoochies handyman help-Forum" on BCSB..."the sportbike forum with members who ride twisties and share reno tips from internet gallaxies afar!"
    RICHES BEFORE BITCHES

    People who never do any more than they get paid for never get paid for any more than they do.
    – Albert Hubbard

  6. #6
    Registered User Array 5thgear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Vancouver
    Bike
    2005 CBR 600RR
    Must be a really fancy goat cage your building.

    Word to the wise, do all your reno's before the inspector comes. If it's existing things like sinks , washroom fixtures are allready in place then you won't need a permit to install them.

  7. #7
    hoochie
    Guest
    Psyclone:
    Typically, all exterior walls are 5/8 drywall. Your unit and the neighbors unit should give at least an hour fire protection.
    To be correctly done, the firestopping is actually behind the board that you cut a hole into. I wish I had a picture to show you, but I cant find one.
    All electrical plugs, vents ( dryers, heating, and kitchen exhaust), plumbing ( water in and drains) are all firestopped prior to insulation, vapor barrier and finished drywall. Any electrical wire that travels from one unit to another, or from floor to floor has been caulked with a fire retardant. So too have water lines etc. Some areas require a fire retarant wool, which gets a self leveling fire retardant compound poured on top of it. In your bathroom, in certain places along your walls, the top of the elevator shaft and the main hallways all have hidden fire barriers.Also if you have a gas fire place in your unit.. there is a firebarrier behind that too. Its actually a long shaft that goes from your unit all the way up to the roof where it vents out. ( you may have a direct vent to the outside.. the long shaft is more common in town houses.) If you were to remove your bathroom ceiling, you would find another ceiling up there...

    But back to the question of the hole you made for the faucet... No you have not compromised anything.

    ahh... i was just thinking of the elevator shafts.... how many of you have ever had the chance to ride the top of an elevator? its fun!
    hey, any other questions you have.... dont be afraid to ask. My answers may be long, but I am just trying to help you understand.
    Cheers,

  8. #8
    bastardizer Array HotWheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Vancouver
    Bike
    none, till the boys are older
    The inspector would only come if you had a permit, but I do believe that the inspector has the right to tear it down to ensure proper practices were exercised when installing.
    During new construction there are certan points when the inspect must come in to check the work (ie insulation, fireproofing plumbing etc). If the inspector is not booked to come in they can than start ripping and pulling during their next inspection.

    RWR, the cab's would have to come down to ensure the FRR. if they are not removed the fire can travel through the cabinets and through the particle board back. The fire would also be able to get through the corners where the drywall meets the cabinet. If this wasn't practice I am sure the drywaller would do it anyways to bill you for the labour.

    but what do I know? I don't usually deal w/ renovations, mostly new construction for me.
    "...than I'll be done and we can dance.."

  9. #9
    I'm napping Array psyclone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    North Vancouver
    Bike
    Suzuki SV650, 2002
    Quote Originally Posted by hoochie
    Psyclone:

    But back to the question of the hole you made for the faucet... No you have not compromised anything.
    Hmm thanks, its hard to find answers for these things. My place was built about the mid 70's. What my place has is two sheets of 5/8" gyproc between suits as fire protection. There is no other fire protection inside the wall that I noticed. I think just to be safe I will cut a piece of gyproc and install it around my faucet. That way I'll have back more or less what I had previously a solid wall of gyproc.
    -
    -
    Current:Suzuki SV650, 2002
    Previous:69 Triumph 500, 71 BSA lightning, 73 Triumph Trident, Yamaha DT125, 85 Honda Nighthawk, 88 Harley Sportster, CB 900...hmm I think thats it

  10. #10
    hoochie
    Guest
    yeah.. better to add further protection. The fire code has probably been increased since those days. I know the things like electrical has changed a lot since then. I was a kid in the 70's, so I am not an expert on what used to be...
    but if you make it to todays standards... you'll have peice of mind.
    glad to help.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •