Need help, Bike wont start after filter change
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Thread: Need help, Bike wont start after filter change

  1. #1
    Registered Abuser Array kuldip's Avatar
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    Need help, Bike wont start after filter change

    I did the plugs and ran here last week. Today I put in a new air filter and she wont start. There was one sensor on the air box and I know I put it back when I was done. The time comes on , on the gauge but when I tunr the key it blanks out like no power. The battery is good I know.
    Any help would be great , I'm getting flustered, been at it for hours.

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  3. #2
    ssblade
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    battery terminals ain't tightened down enuff maybe

  4. #3
    Registered Abuser Array kuldip's Avatar
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    There're on there good and all the fuses check out ok.

  5. #4
    Three hour tour guide Array silverD's Avatar
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    If you put your volt meter across the battery, what does it say when you turn the key and the gauges die?
    I'm not addicted! and I'm not quitting!!
    Heeere's your sign...

    ...and "always" look on the bright side of life...

  6. #5
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuldip
    I did the plugs and ran here last week. Today I put in a new air filter and she wont start. There was one sensor on the air box and I know I put it back when I was done. The time comes on , on the gauge but when I tunr the key it blanks out like no power. The battery is good I know.
    Any help would be great , I'm getting flustered, been at it for hours.
    I'll bet your battery is dead. The clock fading out is the key. A clock takes next to no power to run so if it fades and dies then there is no power in the wireing harness. Usually it's just a low battery but it can be a bad ground connection or you disconnected a plug somewhere by accident.

    Perhaps you left the bike with the parking light on after the last run or the last run on the old battery was just too much for it.

    Got a voltmeter? If so hook it up to the battery. It should be at least 12 volts, more like 12.4 if the battery is in good shape. When you turn on the ignition if should still read high 11's or low 12's. If it drops to 5 or 6 or even less like I suspect it will then it's charger time.

    If this is the case then you haven't been treating it right this winter. If the battery looks good then check the power at the engine cases and a hot wireing point further down the harness. At some point between the clock and the battery the power isn't there. The obvious spot is the battery.

    If you don't have a voltmeter then it's time to get one. Cambodian Tire has a nice little digital one for about $20.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  7. #6
    Registered Abuser Array kuldip's Avatar
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    I keep the battery on a trickle charger but I'll go take the volt meter to check any way

  8. #7
    Registered Abuser Array kuldip's Avatar
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    K, maybe because I had a long day at work and I'm beat but my noggin isn't quite working. You were right TEE TEE...again One of the first post I read on this forum was yours about getting a wall timer from Canadian Tire and using that with a battery charger. I have been doing that all winter and last week when I took it off and fired up my bike after the plug change it started right away, so I assumed the battery was good. Here I am thinking I fried the ECU or something. Thanks again TEE TEE and SS for the help. Much appreciated.

  9. #8
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Ooooo. It's nice to see my ideas at work helping out fellow riders. But I'm a bit worried about your battery condition. How old is it? It should not have gone dead in only a week being off the charger.

    YOu're using a one amp max charger with it on for a max of 1 hr per day I trust? When I checked the Crappy Tire charger I got on a charged battery it only dellivered 100 ma or so (it's been a while) so that equates to a nice trickle charge and an hour a day of that is enough to keep up with the self discharge thing. But if you got a charger that delivers around an amp or more into a good battery that's charged then that's too much and it may have dried out the electrolyte.

    On the other hand if your battery is 4 or so years old then it doesn't owe you anything.....
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  10. #9
    Registered Abuser Array kuldip's Avatar
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    Ya I think it was delivering too many amps. I'm not sure how old the battery is. It was the one that came with the bike when I bought it last year and the bikes an 02 so it can't be that old anyway. It was a lot more than 1 amp that was going throught , I just confirmed the settings. Looks like I may need a new battery. I'll keep an eye on this one for a few days and keep testing it just to be sure.

  11. #10
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    With a dead battery the charger will supply more amps. But as the voltage in the battery comes up it'll resist the charger and the amps will / should drop off to a trickle of about 100 to 200 milliamps. You won't be able to check that until you get a new battery by the sounds of it. When on the charger you can test the battery voltage to determine the charge level. Less than 11.5 volts is DEAD low, As it comes up it'll hit the mid to high 12's pretty fast. When it's close to fully charged it'll be in the mid to high 13's and at that point you can disconnect the charger, set up the meter for current measuring and check the charge current to ensure your charger is providing ONLY a proper trickle charge of 100 to 200 milliamps. It's best if it's closer to the 100 mA delivery.

    If your on charge battery voltage won't come up to over 13 then you've got a doorstop. Either the cells have suphated to death or you have a shorted cell.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  12. #11
    Registered User Array grant's Avatar
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    if your multimeter doesn't have it already, you should get a battery tester.

    Checking the voltage across the terminals is useful, but it doesn't tell you the internal resistance of the battery which is the real measure of its health. You could get 13.5v without load, which seems good, but then 12v with load, which means the battery is dead cuz the internal resistance is so high.

  13. #12
    Registered Abuser Array kuldip's Avatar
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    Well , My bikes back on the road and so far the battery is having no issues at all. I leave it over night and it starts right up. I'm not too sure why it discharged so fast last week.

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