tire pressure
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Thread: tire pressure

  1. #1
    RS Motorcycle Mechanic Array samson_lang's Avatar
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    tire pressure

    dumb question... what tire pressure do you recommend I run in the front and rear tires?

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  3. #2
    Moderator Array Shovelhead's Avatar
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    It should say on your tags.
    The tags are on the swingarm or under the seat.

  4. #3
    SuperStyling Array coolio's Avatar
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    Mine says 32 for rear, and 28 for front. I have a digital gauge, should I keep it exactly at those psi's? Or a few psi's lower?

  5. #4
    Gear whore Array Kamui's Avatar
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    Jul 2002
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    2006 Honda CBR 600RR
    keep pretty close to the recommended pressures on the street... you really shouldn't be pushing that hard in the corners so you will not need lower pressures. If you forget about your tire pressure in the front, it will drastically change your handling... it will start to feel sluggish and hard to turn in. It was almost the cause of me going down once so it is not something to overlook.

    If you were to go to the track, you might run 30-30 to 33-33, but that is because you need the extra traction but then again, this only works when the tires get hot.

    Using the recommended pressure on the street will also help maximize tire life.
    .()_()
    (o'.'o) Thanks to Twinbros Racing for my avatar!

  6. #5
    . Array dhouldsw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolio
    Mine says 32 for rear, and 28 for front. I have a digital gauge, should I keep it exactly at those psi's? Or a few psi's lower?
    Every bike is different, so I would be careful. Mine is 36F, 42R, quite a bit different than yours. Best to find someone with the same bike if you don't have your manual or stickers on the bike.

    ;D

  7. #6
    dazed
    Guest
    Now im gona teach u guys something ive learned from experience and thru racers. Tire pressure keeps the tire kool and it makes sure that it doesnt overheat. Now saying that different compounds require different tire pressure. On my 012ss i used to run 36 but the front tire took a long time to warm up but the rear was perfect i ended up with 29 all the way around when i was riding agressively but now im back to 36. Now the less air pressure the faster the tire will wear. Try different air pressures and find one ur comfortable with and have fun. endos are dope on 36 wheelies are dope at 29

  8. #7
    dazed
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by samson_lang
    dumb question... what tire pressure do you recommend I run in the front and rear tires?

    tell me what kind of tire u got on front and back and tell me how agressive u are and how much u weigh and if u do endos or wheelies and ill tell u what u should run and check it out c if u like it if u dont u can always go back to what u had.

  9. #8
    Moderator Array CoolDaddyGroove's Avatar
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    2014 Kawasaki ZX14R
    2003 954 - Pretty much guarenteed it requires 36/42
    DON'T STUFF THE CAGERS!

  10. #9
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    It varies by bike and tire and load as indicated above. Find that sticker or look in your owner's manual. If you don't have a manual ask for someone with the same bike to check for you.

    When carrying a passenger or a big lump of camping gear for a day ride it's a good thing to bump the pressure up about 3 to 5 psi to reduce the accelerated wear. If you take the bike to Boundry Bay you'll need to drop the pressure down to 30-30 to help speed up the heating and get them hotter for the extra grip and damn the wear.

    The pressures indicated in the manual or on the tag will be a range like 32-36. At the lower end your grip and heating will be enhanced and at the upper end the tire life will be best. Pick where in the range based on an HONEST evaluation of how you ride.

    BTW, this and your suspension thread are great topics. I'm sure you're not the only one looking for such info. Hope you don't mind that using your situation as an example may look a little like we're picking on you. It's not the case.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  11. #10
    RS Motorcycle Mechanic Array samson_lang's Avatar
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    i'm coo with it... i never claim to be an expert, thanks for the heads up

  12. #11
    Ronin_CBR_RR
    Guest
    When I rolled off the lot, they'd suggested a 42 rear 40 front.
    I ended up dropping down a few PSI for the heat/grip factor.
    I'm at 36 rear 32 front cold (unloaded.)
    With the recent temp (13-20c) in lower mainland I've had mad-grip.
    I haven't notice any feathering (except in some of the grip-groves) and
    tire-wear looks consistant from rim to rim.
    I haven't got a temp-probe, but the hand to rubber temp-test has been average rim to rim too.

    edit: Oh ya.... all those warning / advice... ugly stickers were the first to go.

  13. #12
    Gear whore Array Kamui's Avatar
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    2006 Honda CBR 600RR
    40/42 sounds oddly high for a 600

    i'm assuming most are like mine.. 36/42

    i keep mine around there, or maybe 1 or 2 psi lower.

    I've had the front drop to 29 while my rear was still around 39.. that was fucked.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin_CBR_RR
    When I rolled off the lot, they'd suggested a 42 rear 40 front.
    I ended up dropping down a few PSI for the heat/grip factor.
    I'm at 36 rear 32 front cold (unloaded.)
    With the recent temp (13-20c) in lower mainland I've had mad-grip.
    I haven't notice any feathering (except in some of the grip-groves) and
    tire-wear looks consistant from rim to rim.
    I haven't got a temp-probe, but the hand to rubber temp-test has been average rim to rim too.

    edit: Oh ya.... all those warning / advice... ugly stickers were the first to go.
    .()_()
    (o'.'o) Thanks to Twinbros Racing for my avatar!

  14. #13
    . Array dhouldsw's Avatar
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    Having a tire pressure monitoring system installed as we type. Had a small finishing nail in the rear and pressure dropped down to 12psi very gradually over the last while. The system also tells internal tire temperature, that would be good for those of you who want to know when your tires are warmed up.

    ;D

  15. #14
    Registered User Array SpideRider's Avatar
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    I run 36/36 for general riding.
    36F 42R if I have a passenger.
    If I'm going to run aggressive, 33/33.
    Cry in the dojo, laugh on the battlefield
    -----
    Sparring speed is a matter of simple physics:
    The height of your flight is inversely proportionate to the mass of your ass.

  16. #15
    ??????? Array Defaulthonda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpideRider
    I run 36/36 for general riding.
    36F 42R if I have a passenger.
    If I'm going to run aggressive, 33/33.

    Ya these seem like a good guide line!! I run 33 front, 35 rear, it feels really good with just me on it but add a passenger and it feels like crap!! Try going down buy twice as much in the rear as the front till you find what feels good for you.

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