New bike jitters?
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Thread: New bike jitters?

  1. #1
    Registered User Array Rredline's Avatar
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    May 2005
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    Coquitlam
    Bike
    1972 CL350 Scrambler

    New bike jitters?

    Well I finally went out for a ride on my brand-new R6. It seems like I have become a newb all over again.

    I have had my license for about 3 years. I have taken the BCSC course and my last bike was a 600. (see pic)

    However, this is my first sportbike and the first time I have ridden in over a year... and let me tell you it shows.

    I find I am having a really hard time getting the hang of shifting this thing. I look like someone trying to learn how to learn a standard. I am just fine shifting up ... but when I try to drop it through the gears towards a stop sign or light ... i am really jerky.

    I have good traffic skills and what not but I am really rough downshifting. Is it just a question of getting used to the bike? Or is it time to go back to school?!

    I think part of the problem might be the boots I have. I have Icon Motorhead boots. The toe is huge on them ... I find I really don't have a good feel for the shifter with them. I know most folks have Sidi Vertigos here. The toe seems like it would give better feeling. Money is not a issue... riding safely is.

    Any pointers on getting used to a new bike?

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  3. #2
    Obi-Wan Newbie Array Tigon's Avatar
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    Jan 2004
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    Vancouver
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    It's a Honda!!!
    practice practice practice and going back to safety council to take the refresher course would be a good idea. i don't think it is the boots it is just timing and getting use to shifting

  4. #3
    oscarthegrouch
    Guest
    Your R6 revs much higher and faster than your Radian did, so your mind/wrist have to adjust to the need for quicker blips and somewhat more revs during the downshift. The lower the gear, the more difficult the downshift is to do smoothly. Practise your downshifts on the higher gears at first, eg 6/5/4/3 until you are more used to the rev range on your new bike. Then start on the 3/2/1. This will happen anytime you change bikes and there is a noticeable motor diff, so don't sweat it .

    As to the boots, yeah, if the toe box is really thick, it will definitely make your toes a little bit more klutzy. I'm a long time Sidi wearer, so swear by them. However, you will swear AT them if the fit isn't right, so check out all the boots for a good fit.

    Good luck, and enjoy the new beastie !!!

  5. #4
    Twinfan
    Guest
    You are describing a "jerky" sensation when shifting down through the gears while slowing for a light. That likely has nothing to do with your boots and is related to your clutch release. Your boot is only a problem if you are actually failing to push/pull the shift lever enough that you end up in your desired gear. A shift will feel smooth based on your clutch manipulation, not your boot-shifter efforts (unless you are shifting without the clutch - different topic).

    Try easing the clutch out rather then releasing it abrubtly. You should be able to feel the clutch as it starts to engage and the lower gear begins to slow the bike through engine braking. Don't just let it snap back out at this point - you're not done yet, gradually ease it out and remain in control of the lever. Ideally, you will learn to lightly blip the throttle just before you release the clutch so the engine revs come up a little in anticipation of the engine braking effect.

    Easier to learn shifting from 4-3 or from 3-2 rather then from second - first.

    Practice, practice.

    Rob

  6. #5
    Registered Abuser Array rubberhead's Avatar
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    Apr 2005
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    Vancouver
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    blue VFR
    I've got the Vertigos and love 'em. I find that I have to get used to the shifter location when switching bikes regardless of what boots I wear. You'll get comfortable with that soon enough. But like Twinfan said, it's mostly how you catch the revs with your clutch. Optimumly, you would release the clutch just as the revs start to come down so that it sounds and feels nice and smooth. My clutch catches at about 3/4 release of the lever, so I start to release it when I give it some throttle. If you're jerking forward in the saddle, then you're not giving it enough gas, if you're getting knocked backward, then you're giving it too much gas. No big deal, you'll get used to the clutch and gear ratios and will get comfortable syncing the clutch with the revs. Since you've been riding for a while, you'll already know this, so just chalk it up to riding a different bike.

    Good luck and have fun!
    I have two Hondas. Can I breed them?

  7. #6
    Registered User Array Rredline's Avatar
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    May 2005
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    Coquitlam
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    1972 CL350 Scrambler
    Thanks for the support guys. I think I am going to find one of those long deserted farm roads in Maple Ridge and just practice going up and down the gears at moderate speed.
    I am scared to revv this fucker too much at lower gears cuz if I don't have it just right it will bite me in the ass. It has alot of power.

    I think the boots are part of the problem because sometime when I think I have shifted up... the gear hasn't engaged. I am getting Sidis ... the toe box is really thick on these Icons.

    I think I will be ok.... practice ...need to get used to this motor.

    Thanks again

  8. #7
    doug
    Guest
    might wanna adjust the shifter to where its comfortable to you as well. you'd be amazed at how solid your shifting will become if your shifter is set up for your boots and riding style. will help eliminate hitting neutral by accident too.

    once you are comfortable shifting again, flip it over and go gp shift. oh, you are on a yamaha. nevermind.

  9. #8
    ROAR!!!!!! Array Mini's Avatar
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    Apr 2002
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    Taipei, Taiwan
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    Nothing Right Now
    Adjusting the shifter would be helpful. I remember having john (GPD) adjust my shifter when I started riding with motorcyle boots instead of daily runners. It'll make some noticeable difference. Like you, I took a year off riding and just started to ride again this year. Man, do I feel like a noob trying to ride a litre bike. Been riding for almost a month now, still feel rusty as hell.. I guess we just need to ride a lot and get back to where we were
    You are born. And you die. And if you are very lucky in between you get to ride motorcycles!

  10. #9
    rd.guy
    Guest
    these r6,s are a bit twitchy just ride it and in a couple days you will get the feel of it. I felt akward too when i first rode it. Now it is as naturall as butter

  11. #10
    Registered User Array Rredline's Avatar
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    May 2005
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    1972 CL350 Scrambler
    Lol yeah ! Now I know what they mean when they say R6s have notchy throttles.

  12. #11
    Moderator Array CoolDaddyGroove's Avatar
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    May 2002
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    New West
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    2014 Kawasaki ZX14R
    Clutch/throttle control dude...............practice.
    DON'T STUFF THE CAGERS!

  13. #12
    Team No Team Array
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Vancouver
    Bike
    CRF450X
    Just drag / slip the clutch out man, drag the heck out of it. No blipping needed. Its a wet clutch so dun worry about wearing down the plates. Unless of course your clipping it at 12 grand, then its a different story.

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