engine oil???
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Thread: engine oil???

  1. #1
    azn_gixxer
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    engine oil???

    anyone know the differance between motorcycle oil and car oil?? can you use car oil insted??

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  3. #2
    Team Mspeed Performance Array rob270's Avatar
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    I don't recommend it.

    You have to remember motorcycles have wet clutches, cars don't. If the oil has additives or doesn't have the right additives with this in mind your clutch will slip or glaze up and this could be an expensive repair.
    WMRC #270

  4. #3
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    That's not just a guess or recomend item Robin.

    Car oils with the SH rating now have special low friction modifiers in them. Good for the engine in either our cars or the bikes but bad for the clutch if it's a wet design like 99.99% of all bikes out there. You need to use SG (or earlier SF) rated oil which is known as "motorcycle" oil nowadays. Or if you can find some old car oil stock then good for you.

    And it's not just a clutch thing. The new additives don't stand up as well to the severe forces in the motorcycle transmissions either. It's been a few years but there was a test that measured the viscosity of the oil at various duty times for car and bike engines and the bikes really rip the long molecular chains apart in a hurry under normal circumstances. But the new car oils broke down even faster than the old types. Not a lot faster but when you add that to the wet clutch problems then it's a clear issue.

    Same with car vs bike synthetics. You need the bike stuff nowadays or risk the clutch slipping.

    Strangely enough it's only really a big problem if you buy the really good car oils. I've heard of people with lower power bikes using the cheaper new car specific oils with no problem.

    Or if you never use full throttle then you could use the new stuff too.......... right, like THAT'S gonna work..........
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  5. #4
    Which way is up? Array Hoser's Avatar
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    I read a report on oil testing and they could not find any reason not to use car oil. The only thing they recommended is that you stay away from oils that are designed for energy conservation. Unfortunatly or should I say fortunatly I'm currently in the Kootenays enjoying the rides of my life and am therefore unable to post the link to these reports.
    One of them was done by the university of california. The oil they had the best results with is Mobil tri synthetic. I have been using this oil in my bike as well as my wifes and have since put on 25000 km's without any ill effects or problems. The bikes are also running much cooler.
    And all at $25.- for 4 liters of full synthetic rather then $75.-.
    If you check your manual you will see that they do not tell you that you have to use motorcycle specific oil but rather oils that comply to a specific rating. It is the bike shops that want you to believe that you need to buy this expensive oil. A fellow my wife knows has a school at which he teaches people how to ride a motorcycle and helps them get their license. In all his bikes he uses Mobil 1. Now he has a lot of use and abuse done to his bike by all his students but never did he have any problems related to oil.
    Anyway, I should be back home towards the end of the week and will then post they link to the web site so you can make up your own mind. Personally I would rather spend the money I save on my baby rather than making the oil companies richer.
    Last edited by Hoser; 08-12-2002 at 11:25 PM.
    ...if Harley Davidson built airplanes. Would You fly in them???

  6. #5
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Hoser
    .....If you check your manual you will see that they do not tell you that you have to use motorcycle specific oil but rather oils that comply to a specific rating......
    And I believe if you'll find that they say SG rated oils. I know they do for my 9R. Most of the car oil is SH which denotes the special energy conservation additives. But hey, if it's working for you then keep on using it. It's not every clutch that is sensitive to this oil. Just the ones that don't have enough spring pressure on the plates to overcome the extra sliperiness.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  7. #6
    fokus racing Array PrettyBoy's Avatar
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    FEATURES AND BENEFITS OF SYNTHETIC MOTOR OIL
    Most of us have at least a nutshell understanding of the difference between conventional and synthetic motor oils. Conventional motor oils are refined from crude oil that has been pumped from the ground. Refining is a process that physically separates light and heavy components and valuable material from valueless. Synthetic motor oils are the result of a chemical reaction called "synthesis." The end result is a molecular uniformity impossible to achieve with refining processes.

    The key features of synthetic lubricants are three in number. One, because they are derived from pure chemicals, synthetics contain no contaminants. Their fundamental purity protects them from the degradation that contaminants invite. Two, their smoother molecular uniformity that assists to more effectively reduce friction. This uniform structure also helps synthetics resist thinning in heat and thickening in cold, enabling them to provide better protection over a wider operating temperature range. Three, synthetics are designable. Scientists can customize synthetic lubricants to fulfill nearly every lubricating need, for even the most demanding conditions.

    Now, how does this translate into benefits for the customer? And are these benefits worth the extra price tag? If you're not convinced, you'll have a difficult time persuading Glenda, Roger and Lucille (your next three customers).

    BENEFITS
    Let's run through some of the benefits offered by synthetic motor oil. They will be addressed in no particular order of importance. It will note the feature or characteristic, and follow with the details.

    * Superior friction reduction.
    This means reduced engine wear, which helps engines last longer and require fewer repairs. This also helps improve fuel economy. Cars can get better mileage per gallon.

    * Cooler operation.
    Because they reduce friction better, engines run cooler. It may not be noticed from the driver's seat, but it can be noticed while straddling a hot motorcycle engine. Cooler engines resist stress and wear. As a result, engines last longer, perform better and require fewer repairs.

    * Thermal and oxidative stability.
    Because of their more inherent stability, synthetic motor oils have a greater resistance to the formation of sludge, varnish, deposits and other by-products of lubricant degradation. This means engines stay cleaner, which helps them last longer, perform better and require fewer repairs.

    * Low temperature fluidity.
    The low pour point with synthetics is one of the most visible demonstrations one can make, and in northern tier states it becomes a strong selling point for synthetics. Here in Minnesota we have engine heaters and people plug their cars in during the coldest winter months. Synthetics, some of which flow to seventy below zero, allow easier cold starts. The oil flows more quickly to critical moving parts, providing better protection against wear during start-ups. Reduced wear means fewer repairs.

    * Broad temperature range of application.
    This means there is better engine protection at both high and low temperatures.

    * Extended service life capability.
    Because most synthetic motor oils last longer than conventional oils, motorists needn't live in fear when they fail to service their vehicles in -- Ooops! Maybe we'll save our discussion on this one for next time.

  8. #7
    Which way is up? Array Hoser's Avatar
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    Check under Bike Tech & Mods. I have posted a couple of threads to some reading on oils.
    ...if Harley Davidson built airplanes. Would You fly in them???

  9. #8
    Je ne suis pas Francais Array nutcracker's Avatar
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    I put mazola and it runs great
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    I'd rather be scared to death than bored to death.

  10. #9
    fokus racing Array PrettyBoy's Avatar
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    KY works pretty good too, also comes in handy when your horny and have to pull over for a few minutes.

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