Creatine and coffee
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Thread: Creatine and coffee

  1. #1
    Registered User Array SpideRider's Avatar
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    Creatine and coffee

    I've always understood that because coffee is a diuretic, it shouldn't be consumed with creatine.
    My question is can I still have a cup of coffee in the morning, and use creatine post-workout a couple hours later, or at the end of the day?
    I'm wondering if I'm flushing the expensive stuff out of my system before it has a chance to work?
    If I'm using creatine regularly, does that mean I have to cut out coffee altogether? If not, what is the recommended time to wait?
    Thanks in advance!
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  2. #2
    Posing with conviction Array heisenberg9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpideRider View Post
    I've always understood that because coffee is a diuretic, it shouldn't be consumed with creatine. If I'm using creatine regularly, does that mean I have to cut out coffee altogether? If not, what is the recommended time to wait?
    Hey Spide, I did a bit of reading on creatine, after reading your post, and found some interesting info from this web page...


    Q: I heard that creatine and caffeine can be consumed at the same time. But an article I read claims caffeine inhibits the absorption of creatine into muscle tissue. Which is true?

    A: There was a controversial research study published in 1996 in the Journal of Applied Physiology about creatine and caffeine; however, if you study that article closely, you'll find that caffeine had no effect on creatine uptake into muscle. A more recent study by Vanakoski, et al. in 1998 investigated the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and creatine, both alone and in combination. They reported when creatine was used alone or even in combination with caffeine that, "creatine was rapidly and efficiently absorbed, as reflected by plasma concentrations." Because researchers concluded that creatine was efficiently absorbed even when combined with caffeine, it does not appear from the results of this study that caffeine exerts a negative effect on the uptake of creatine into muscle tissue.
    Learned something today.

  3. #3
    Registered User Array
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    nice. that site offers up some good info.

    i've also been told that taking creatine with grape juice helps. Just not orange juice...

  4. #4
    Registered User Array SpideRider's Avatar
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    As with everything in sports science, I heard the opposite about the juice. It used to be recommended to take it with grape juice, but now that isn't so. I can't remember why though.
    I just take mine with plain water anyway.
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    Regurgitated User Array Pluto's Avatar
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    Creatine volumizes cells so you can retain more water. If you are consuming caffienne or alcohol them you need to drink a lot more water. Simple as that.
    You are consuming at least 2L of water a day, right?

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    Regurgitated User Array Pluto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by animationdebbie View Post
    nice. that site offers up some good info.

    i've also been told that taking creatine with grape juice helps. Just not orange juice...
    I thought that was for LSD. No?

  7. #7
    Registered User Array SpideRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pluto View Post
    Creatine volumizes cells so you can retain more water. If you are consuming caffienne or alcohol them you need to drink a lot more water. Simple as that.
    You are consuming at least 2L of water a day, right?
    I consume so much water each day that I'm running to the bathroom every 90 minutes.
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    Registered User Array Jimi G's Avatar
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    Grape juice works well because of its high sugar content. Dextrose helps transport creatine, increasing its effectiveness. Its about using something with a high glycemic index to spike insulin levels. cheers!
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    Registered User Array radmtrbkr's Avatar
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    "coffee" is not a diuretic, caffeine is. that said there is not enough caffeine in coffee to have a diuretic effect. the reason you pee after drinking coffee is because it is 99.9% WATER. substitute water for coffee in the morning and pee the same.

  10. #10
    Bring on the sun Array Bandit_Ryder's Avatar
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    You can have both it doesn't matter. I'll tell you one thing tho - creatine is a fucking waste of money.
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    No the pic is not me Array snowshark84's Avatar
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    Jimi G had it right about the sugar (dextrose is the best but fructose or sucrose will work just fine too) helping transport the creatine. The best time to use creatine is right after a weight session. 5grams in a shake with some water and then have some simple carbs (something sugary like honey or straight sugar).
    Creatine will help you gain weight, lets for arguments sake say 10 lbs, however when you stop using creatine you will lose 8 or 9 lbs due to no longer retaining that much water. I still find that extra pound of muscle worth a few bucks a month.
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  12. #12
    Moderator Array CoolDaddyGroove's Avatar
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    You should just chew the creatine dry. That is the best way to take it.
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  13. #13
    Got Hammer? Array gixxstar's Avatar
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    There is a proposed interaction between caffeine and creatine but the mechanism isn't considered to be due to a diuretic effect of caffeine. There is some evidence to suggest that caffeine can reduce the effectiveness of creatine. Caffeine is thought to inhibit the re-synthesis of phosphocreatinine. It appears to be an intracellular mechanism so I can't really say with certaintly what would be appropriate for spacing without a lot more reading but my judgement says that it should be cut out while your supplementing with creatine or at least 6-8 hours before your workout. Forgive the copy-paste but here's the mechanism of action for creatine:

    Mechanism of Action: return to top
    Creatine is found primarily in skeletal muscle (95&#37, but is also found in heart, brain, testes, retina, and other tissues (3997,3998). The body synthesizes 1 to 2 grams of creatine a day, primarily in the liver, kidneys, and pancreas (3997). Dietary sources, such as fish and meats, supply an additional 1 to 2 grams. For example, one pound of fresh uncooked steak contains about 2 grams of creatine (4575). Intestinal absorption of creatine is nearly 100% (6052). Creatine is irreversibly converted to creatinine and excreted by the kidneys (3997). Creatine in skeletal muscles exists in dynamic equilibrium with phosphocreatine (3997). Body stores of phosphocreatine in skeletal muscle serve as a precursor to the energy molecule, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Higher levels of creatine are thought to enhance the ability to renew ATP for short 10-20 second energy bursts and improve resynthesis of phosphocreatine during recovery from intense exercise. Creatine supplementation enhances both creatine and phosphocreatine concentrations, providing a larger total creatine pool in the skeletal muscle. Creatine hinders the creatine-creatine kinase-phosphocreatine circuit. However, there is some debate about whether increased phosphocreatine resynthesis actually occurs (2103,3997,4574,4576,4580,4583,6925,6927,11330).
    People who have lower initial total creatine, such as vegetarians, are more likely to respond to supplemental creatine, while people with higher initial levels may not respond (4574). Repeated creatine dosing causes a reduction in creatine clearance. Skeletal muscle has a saturation point at which additional supplemental creatine will not increase intracellular creatine levels. This reduction may result from skeletal muscle saturation (10065), which occurs within the first few days of loading (3999,6052,10065). Excess supplementation increases urinary creatine and creatinine (4576). Exogenous creatine supplementation also appears to reduce endogenous creatine production; whether this has any clinically significant negative effect on metabolic regulation within the liver is unknown (6052). After discontinuing supplementation, endogenous creatine production and creatine levels typically return to baseline within 28 days (2101,4582,6052). Preliminary research suggests creatine might increase the activity of muscle precursor cells called satellite cells, causing muscular hypertrophy (13773). However, most clinical evidence supports increased cellular water retention as the primary cause of creatine-induced muscle gain (4569,4575,4576,4579,4588,6061,10062). The muscle enlargement due to increased water retention is short term. This is compared to the muscle enlargement from strength training, which results in an increase in contractile and structural muscle proteins (6052). Creatine may allow athletes to train harder due to increased phosphocreatine resynthesis and subsequent energy production (6061). Creatine might also reduce lactate production (4604); however, this has not been consistently found in studies (4592). In patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), the cardiac creatine phosphate/adenosine triphosphate is lower than in people with normal cardiac function and correlates with the severity of heart failure (1369). Creatine phosphate appears to improve CHF by preserving intracellular high-energy phosphates in the myocardium, stabilizing the sarcolemma, preventing peroxidative damage, and improving microcirculation (1369). In patients with gyrate atrophy, an inherited metabolic disease in which phosphocreatine is depleted, supplemental creatine increased myofibrillar protein synthesis resulting in muscle accretion (4576,4587). In myophosphorylase deficiency, known as McArdle disease, a rare genetic metabolic disease in which ATP cannot be formed from glycogen in skeletal muscle, supplemental creatine is thought to serve as a source of energy (70). Creatine appears to also affect lipid metabolism. There is some preliminary evidence that it can modestly reduce total cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol (4573). Early laboratory evidence also suggests that creatine might be useful in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease, possibly due to neuroprotective effects (4566,4567,4568). There is conflicting evidence on creatine and cancer. Some research suggests that creatine and its analogs, such as cyclocreatine, inhibit tumor growth (1393,1406,1432,1481). Creatine might alter energy production by the creatine kinase system, which appears to play a role in controlling some types of tumors such as breast tumors and neuroblastomas (1393,1406). Other research suggests that creatine or its metabolites can form mutagenic substances when combined at room temperature with sugars or heated (1486,1487), but this has not been verified.

  14. #14
    banned user Array adam112's Avatar
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    two types of Creatine with different effects

    Citrate/MonoHydrate

    Look at what type your taking and read up on them. Different results. Water retention as size is pretty lame.
    Too sexy for this forum.

  15. #15
    Registered User Array SpideRider's Avatar
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    Basically I'm reading that my cup of coffee in the morning won't affect my (average) 6 p.m. creatine dose.
    Thanks for the help everyone!
    Cry in the dojo, laugh on the battlefield
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    The height of your flight is inversely proportionate to the mass of your ass.

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