Newbies, get in here!
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Thread: Newbies, get in here!

  1. #1
    Registered User Array jotti's Avatar
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    '07 gsxr 600

    Newbies, get in here!

    Take a course!

    Let me start off by saying I have always been one of those who is not afraid to read an instructional article on how to ____ and I then go out and apply it. I have done this all my life in addition to watching videos and getting some help from friends or what have you. Sure enough my course date a month away and a shiny new bike in my backyard I got the heebie jeebies and jumped on. The parking lot got boring fast and wasn't always available, one more week left I decided to wait it out.

    Today was the first 3 hours of theory with a crazy guy and I can't wait to feed on more life saving information from a dedicated professional. Prior to this course, I thought I knew what I was doing, boy was I wrong. No amount of 'teaching' from friends could surpass what I learned in a few hours today. What else is there to say, take a course!

    Most important lesson learned today? For me it was probably balance. I have ridden a cbr600rr and I sure as hell thought I had some things down pat, only to be awaken by the realization in that classroom that this course probably saved my life.

    I learned the proper adjustment of ones clutch and brake levers and was able to nitpick my friend who has been riding for a couple years and help his riding by in turn teaching him. That and one or two pointers later he promised me he would attend a course. Riding school just saved two 'young' lives today. Truth.

    Pondering these thoughts above, and a snippet of info that I wish I had hammered into me by reading old threads on BCSB was that 'insurance' on a motorcycle is basically the survival techniques and tactics you will only ever learn in a professional classroom environment. That is the only insurance you have out there on the streets. Your zillion dollar coverage from icbc will not make up for your inability to properly throttle out of a corner. Are you a light switch on and off rider or do you know how to work the dimmers!!! That alone can save your life in a sticky situation!

    This is only a smidgen of the information I absorbed today. I could go on for an hour but alas it is late.

    This concludes day 1 of classroom theory. I will periodically update as I knew back a few months ago, I would have enjoyed reading this sort of thread and hope some of you do too.

    If you have any questions do not hesitate, this is the Official Newbie Q&A forum after all.


    mmmh donuts, who wants donuts

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  3. #2
    Rockets suit me Array Qjet's Avatar
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    2006 ninja 500
    I'm having a case of insomnia too tonight. Know how that feels.
    I'm curious what you learned! Brake and clutch adjustment are things that come with preference and riding, I personally like my throttle to have 1 mm of play, and i like my clutch a little loose and my brakes a little tight. I probably wouldn't go criticizing your riding buddies set up just yet.

    Also what life saving techniques did you learn so far? Weight balance on corners? On a 600rr you BETTER know that. Bikes like the cbr125 have equal contact patches and inorder to get the best cornering you kinda have to coast through a corner... but a 600rr has a fat rear.

    I'm one of those new riders that is convinced that a course isn't for me. Since your a new rider (registered 2003??) taking a course, I'd like to hear what your learning.

  4. #3
    Moderator Array flowrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qjet View Post
    Bikes like the cbr125 have equal contact patches and inorder to get the best cornering you kinda have to coast through a corner... but a 600rr has a fat rear.
    What??? Coast?
    Flowbie- Mellowing with age...

    Stolen from Atom:
    Being a road crayon sucks....put your gear between you and the pavement.

  5. #4
    Rockets suit me Array Qjet's Avatar
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    kinda! I didn't say put the clutch in and slow down!

  6. #5
    NateR1
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    "chuckles"

  7. #6
    Twin A Array Jaybo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qjet
    I'm one of those new riders that is convinced that a course isn't for me.
    Qjet no offense man, but after reading your stuff for a while now I really think you should consider getting some proper instruction. some of the stuff you post is just, well.. good luck
    Last edited by Jaybo; 09-21-2007 at 10:28 AM.
    Some people are like Slinkies ...
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  8. #7
    Registered User Array 888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qjet View Post


    I'm one of those new riders that is convinced that a course isn't for me. Since your a new rider (registered 2003??) taking a course, I'd like to hear what your learning.

    I've been riding for over 15 years now, my buddy & I both took a course from BCSC. So far so good. But my buddy's brother & his friend decided NOT to take a course and both ended up crashing within the first year of riding.

  9. #8
    Registered User Array 888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jotti View Post

    If you have any questions do not hesitate, this is the Official Newbie Q&A forum after all.


    mmmh donuts, who wants donuts

    How fast do you have to go before the wheel weights fly off?

  10. #9
    African BCSB Rep. Array PitScar's Avatar
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    Nothing :( SStolen DRZ400S. Previously 2007 Suzuki TF-125, DRZ350SE, and 81 KX125
    Quote Originally Posted by 888 View Post
    How fast do you have to go before the wheel weights fly off?

    I thought you said you'd been riding for 15 years?

    Everyone (with experience anyway) knows the wheel weights keep your front end on the ground.
    Stuck in Africa. Follow here or here.

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  11. #10
    Going slow to go fast Array Castro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    Qjet no offense man, but after reading your stuff for a while now I really think you should consider getting some proper instruction. some of the stuff you post is just, well.. good luck
    I have to agree with Jaybo, you really should take a course Qjet. I'm a new rider and took the Action school in Langley and they REALLY taught me alot. I ended up acing my MST and I just passed my road test yesterday with only a few marks off. They have ~85&#37; pass rate with their students.

    Along with the technical aspects of riding, a motorcycle school really teaches you how to stay alive out there. Where to put the bike in certain situations, what to look out for, how to make the manuever, etc... They say it has been proven that taking a course like this is equivalent to having 2 or more years of riding experience.

    I myself am addicted to learning and it sounds like you are too. Trust me, you will get your fill with one of these courses. The only bad thing that can happen is that you might waste some time and money (99% sure that won't happen), but the worst is that you might not be prepared for a critical situation on the road. I know my life is worth more than $600.


  12. #11
    Posing with conviction Array heisenberg9's Avatar
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    Good post/thread jotti. People all need to be reminded from time to time how good and potentially life saving the motorcycle safety courses are.

    Maybe others who have taken a course this summer should chime in with their experiences.

  13. #12
    Registered User Array
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    i agree.. i took the PRS course and it was worth every cent. Saved my life already.. i though i knew how to ride before.. but that thought totally changed once i took the course..

  14. #13
    NateR1
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    i never yook no course and im still alive

  15. #14
    I ride a thumper Array Bunny's Avatar
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    I took a course last month and within 1-2 weeks I went from never even sitting on a motorcycle before to being able to safetly manage city and highway traffic. If i hadn't taken a course I don't know if I'd be out of the parking lot by now.

    My road test is Oct 2. *fingers crossed*
    Goals are dreams with deadlines.

  16. #15
    Rockets suit me Array Qjet's Avatar
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    ok ok folks i know you mean well. But the choice I've made isn't "I'll figure the bike out over time" it's "I'll do the learning on my own"
    They SOUND similar but they really arn't

    Let me explain it like this:
    A school is a simple public institution, teachers come in and design a lesson plan on how they will explain a subject to their students. They do this based on the materials they hand out (i said SCHOOL not UNIVERSITY). The material is publicly available, the information exists, but students very commonly need a guide. However, occasionally someone steps out and says "I don't like!" The response is first "Too bad" and then second "Well in that case you can learn the material on your own" And there are systems in place to let that happen.

    the material that these people cover is publicly available, they are there to take that initiative element out and help you learn. There are pro's and con's to my choices, and believe me i see them. I won't get the finite information about handling that public information doesn't provide, the possibility of developing bad habits, no objective eye to gauge my progress, and my ability to ask questions is limited. These are the very same limitations that a student of something like math would have to face if he was to learn the subject on his own.

    now this isn't saying that i haven't acknowledged what you have said, the statement of someone who's riding for 15 years carries alot of weight. but my opinions are strong, and require more to shake them.

    I try to remain as objective as possible about my capabilities, but at the same time I think ive gone through some rough stuff so far. I've had my front tire push out from under me during a corner, I've had my rear tire spin out on manure, I've had cars, trucks try to flatten me so far to, unexpected sprays of gravel, I've had way more rain days then i would like so far and i live in a semi arid city! and i think this is 5 group rides so far in my month of riding. Tagged on 3000 KM and although this may seem very unimpressive to some of you, I've handled it all using the applications of what i've learned through my own studies, not through instruction, and not by haphazardly learning on my own. Thats my honest position on this.
    I'm sorry if im being an ass
    or if i'm just simply failing to "get" it.
    but thats my position.
    Sorry my post ended up jacking your thread Jotti

    So what else have you learned?

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