A call for Simple Servicing Procedures - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 38

Thread: A call for Simple Servicing Procedures

  1. #16
    this is my...boomstick! Array CrotchetyRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    BC
    Bike
    click, click
    So, You Wanna Jet Your Bike, Hmm?

    by CrotchetyRocket

    Lots of people think carburettors are some arcane and mystical creature and that getting them right is akin to finding a unicorn or a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. Nothing could be further from the truth.

    Carbs are miracles of the mechnical art and deserve respect for doing something inherently very complex, as well as they do. Now, for those of you that don't have degrees in Fluid Dynamics and just want to jet your carbs to match you new pipe or clear up the mistakes the factory made; here's some guidance.

    First, you are going to have to get to the carbs. This has varying degrees of difficulty, depending on the bike. A ZX-11 is a pain for example, due to enclosed bodywork but, a ZRX-12 is fairly straightforward. Usually, the procedure is, remove seat, remove tank, remove airbox and you're there. To remove the tank, shut off the fuel, unbolt it, and move it so you can disconnect the fuel and vacuum lines (if equipped) from it. Carefully lift the tank off and set it somewhere safe on something soft, so it won't get nicked or bashed.

    Removing the airbox also varies. Typically, there are a number of bolts holding down the lid and when you have those off, the ones holding the base are revealed and can be removed. There may also be a seperate plate held to the carb mouths or it may be integral to the airbox but, you've got to clear all this away so, you are looking at naked carbs.

    What you'll see when you've done this is the carb mouth. You'll be able to see a slide with a needle attached to it. The needle goes into what's called the emulsion tube. Just inside the carb mouth will be 2 small visible tubes or holes, likely in the lower part of the carb body, one in line with the needle and one just off to the side. The one in line is the main air jet and the one to the side is the pilot jet. On the bottom of the carb you'll see a casting held on by screws. This is your float bowl which contains, no surprise, a float as well as a needle a seat assembly.

    Now for some definitions and functions:

    Pilot jet: This controls fuel flow mostly for idle and low speed operation. Through the combination of the pilot jet, the pilot air jet and the pilot screw position, this is richened or leaned.

    Main air jet: This controls the flow of air to the emulsion tube/needle assembly and is primarily responsible for midrange fuel flow. The air enters the emulsion tube and blows the fuel into a fine mist; "emulsion" means, at it's simplest, "mixing".

    Now you'll need to remove the carbs to proceed. Usually you can install a jet kit without seperating the carbs or removing the throttle cables but, not always. You'll almost certainly have to remove the choke cable. Unscrew its holder from the top of the carb it's attached to and rotate the cable 'til it comes out of the holder/lever arm.

    The carbs need to be drained before you can go further. Usually, you'll see a little pipe sticking out of the float bowl with a screw near it. When you undo the screw fuel will drain from the float bowls. Use a small container or a length of vacuum hose to a container to capture the draining fuel.

    The carbs themselves will likely be held onto their respective manifolds by worm clamps of some kind. Loosen all of them. At this point, check to see if there are any vacuum lines or electrical connections to the carbs and disconnect and label them, so you know where they go and don't come crying to someone like me because you forgot where a line or two go!

    The carbs will usually need a little rocking to loosen them and then try to pull the entire rack off smoothly and carefully. Flip the rack over so the float bowls are up and you are ready to install your jet kit.

    Stuff rags or paper towel down the intake manifolds to prevent junk from entering the engine. Look carefully for a little brass or plastic cap near the front (throttle plate side) of the carb. This covers your mixture screws and will need to be removed. I use a "pin vise", a tiny hand held drill available at any hobby shop, and a small tap to pull the plug. Be careful! You don't have to go far in to punch through the plug and you don't want to bugger up pilot screws behind it.

    Undo the bowl screws but, pull only one bowl at a time. Inside you will find a couple of metal tubes screwed into the top of the float chamber, and a plastic float. The bigger tube is the emulsion tube and will have a little orifice screwed into its bottom. This is your main jet. The smaller tube is your pilot jet. Near the float hinge you'll see a tiny little metal cylinder attached to the hinging float. This is the float needle.

    Time for more definitions and functions:

    Emulsion tube: Flow through this is controlled by the needle rising and falling and is responsible for midrange performance, primarily.

    Main jet: Mounted in the bottom of the Emulsion tube, this little orifice controls mixture at wide open throttle (WOT), primarily.

    Pilot jet: Delivers the fuel for idle and low speed running conditions. It works in combination with the pilot air jet and the mixture screw position to fatten or lean the low-speed mixture.

    Float: Like the water level sensor assemby in your toilet, it tells the carb its float bowl is full.

    Float needle: This is attached to the float and opens or closes by pressing on a seat. This allows or shuts off fuel flow to the float bowl.

    Your typical jet kit will contain main jets, emulsion tubes, needles, clips and washers for the needles and possibly pilot jets as well.

    I start by removing the pilot jet, if required. This is usually equipped with a cut for a slotted screwdriver. Unwind it, carefully place it aside where it won't get lost and install the new pilot jet. Then set the pilot screws you uncovered when you pulled the little plugs to the starter setting you jet kit suggests.

    Next, I move on to the main jet and emulsion tube. Remove the main jet first with your slotted screwdriver, being careful as these are made of soft metal and are easily distorted. Set the jet where it won't get lost and remove the emulsion tube with a 1/4 inch ratchet and what is most likely an 8 or 10mm socket. Replace the tube with the one in the kit and replace the jet with the suggested starting point jet from your kit. 5-10 inch/pounds are all you need to install these. Do not overtighten them or you'll strip the carb body and have to buy a new carb.

    Next comes setting the float height. Usually, you'll have to rotate the carb do the hinge is upward and just touching the needle. Also usually, you'll measure from the bowl flange to the base of the float. I use a meachnics caliper for this but a decent millimetric ruler will suffice. A good tool shop can supply a ruler that is ruled from the very edge of the ruler, not 2-4 mils in as your elementary school rulers are. The right setting will vary but, usually 4-5 mm is what's required. If it's wrong, remove the screw holding down the float hinge, remove the float, remove its needle and carefully bend the tang on the float the required way to correct it. This is a pain in the butt as it may take a few tries to get right and you have to reassemble it every time to check it. Be careful not to drop the needle, the mounting screw or the float hinge bar. They are easily lost and hard to replace individually.

    Float height is often overlooked and can cause low speed running problems if set too high or high rpm power problems if set too low.

    Once this is done, replace the bowl and repeat for all the carbs.

    I'd suggest a short break here; no coffee or beer though; these beverages don't go with jet kit installs very well!

    Once you're back and ready for action, flip the carbs over right side up and you'll be looking at some big caps held down with screws. These contain your slide diaphragms, slide springs, the slides themselves and the needle.

    Further definitions and functions:

    Slide: Using engine vacuum and slide spring tension, the slide opens and closes like a choke on the air horn of an old car carburettor. What this does is, essentially, make the carb variable in terms of size so you can get clean throttle response at low rpms/light throttle and yet have a carb volume large enough to feed your ravenous 12,000 rpm monster at WOT.

    Slide diaphragm: Corralls the engine vacuum moving the slide. It is usually made of a nice nitrile rubber.

    Slide spring: Forces the slide into its naturally closed position and helps control the rate of slide opening.

    Needle: This is hung off the bottom of the slide, is tapered and goes into the emulsion tube. It rises and falls with the slide, allowing fuel to leave the emulsion tube, to particularly enrich or lean the engine in midrange conditions.

    Unscrew one of the caps, being careful here as the spring will want to fire stuff into the darkest recesses of your garage, never to be seen again.

    Put aside the cap and spring and you'll see the diaphragm. Grasp whatever hard part is in the middle of it and carefully pull it straight up and out. Make sure you don't tear that diaphragm or you may have stress similar to when you tear the other type of diaphragm many of us are familiar with!

    Typically, there will be a clip in the middle of the diaphragm and you'll need to undo this. This will allow you to carefully tap the slide top onto a surface and the needle will fall out, possible in accompaniment with a washer. Make sure that the washer goes back in if that's what your kit calls for.

    Take the needles from you kit, install the e-clip provided in the starting point groove at the top of the needle, the washer if it fell out, and drop them into the slide hole. Do not apply any side force to the needle you can avoid. Then put the clip back and reinstall the slides. Repeat for all the carbs.

    Now you'll need to reinstall the carbs. I'd suggest going to the pharmacy and buying some Astro-Glide or, you can use silicone brake grease. Don't use any petroleum based grease, including Vaseline!

    Smear a little Astro-Glide inside the rubber manifolds the carbs were attached to. This will ease their entry. Push straight and square and slide the carb rack back onto the manifolds, connect up the choke cable and anything else you removed, move the throttle to ensure normal operation and reinstall the airbox assembly.

    You will now need to synch the carbs. A very nice synching tool is the Morgan Carbtune II. I recommend it. You simply cannot skip this step.

    Hook your synch tool up to the ports on the manifold. You may have to remove a bolt or two and install some vacuum hose barbs. These are generally provided with any synching tool.

    Supply fuel by either reconnecting the tank temporarily or using a small fuel supply you fab yourself. Turn the fuel on to fill the bowls, fire the bike and set the idle as low as it will run without heavy stumble (usually 800-900 rpm).

    Synch the carbs as 1-2 and 3-4 pairs first, then use the centre synching screw to synch the pairs together. The screws you are adjusting are between the carb bodies usually and have little springs on them under the screw heads. It may take a bit of time to get this right; it's worth it.

    Reinstall the tank permanently and any bodywork and take it out for a spin.

    Stay tuned...for an article on tuning your jet kit! The fun has just begun!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BCSportBikes.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #17
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,
    Originally posted by FloMan
    If you have plans to travel far on your bike this summer, you might want to invest the modest amount of $50 or around there and buy the following items:
    Pump/CO2 adapter: $39, at any bicycle store
    CO2 cartridges: $1 or $2 at any bicycle store or outdoors store
    Tire plugging kit: $8 at Canadian tire

    If you happen to get a flat in the middle of nowhere( like the Rockies for example), you will not be stranded. Plug your tire with the kit, then use the pump and 2 or 3 CO2 cartridges to reinflate it and Voila, you are back on the road. Replace the tire as soon as you get back to civilization. It's a very cheap and very compact solution to a potentially life threatening problem.(Getting stranded in the mountains is not fun).
    Here is a pic of all the items. Put everything into a small plastic case( like a first aid box) and you're set to go. Don't expose the CO2 cartridges to extreme heat or they'll explode. Direct sun light is ok though.
    An excellent kit for under your saddle for anyone that ventures out on longer rides. Even on the "Loop" it's a long way from help if you flat during mid run.

    Just don't expect to go fast or lean far after this. These cheap plugs are outside insertion types and they are only intended as an EMERGENCY AND TEMPORARY fix. It's survival time and limping home as saner speeds and lean angles is prudent. Remember that you've just used all your CO2 or worn yourself out with the manual pump getting back on the road. Don't mess it up by trying to hang with your bud's and dislodging the plug for a SECOND flat. Yes it sucks but the moral is "live to ride another day". Or if that doesn't turn your crank then how about avoiding "I got home at 2AM after pushing the bike with a flat for 3 hours."

    Thanks for a fine post there Floman.



    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  4. #18
    this is my...boomstick! Array CrotchetyRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    BC
    Bike
    click, click
    Forgot to put this in with the "install..." article...

    HTH

    Crotch


    So, You Want To Tune Your Jet Kit, Hmm?

    by CrotchetyRocket

    Wow, where to start. It seems daunting. Tuning this new jet kit you just installed. Don't worry; if you take a systematic approach and take good notes, you can do this.

    A disclaimer first: If you don't have access to a dyno facility with a qualified operator, you may be doing some testing on the street. I don't advocate this and am not responsible for the trouble you get yourself into, if you choose to do that.

    You've obviously started tuning your jet kit by following the manufacurer's baseline recommendations for your bike.

    It's possible your bike may run really well on the manufacturer's baselines but, in most cases something will not be as you like it.

    If you're not happy, here's where to start. First, create a table with these columns: Main Jet, Pilot Jet, Pilot Screw Position, Float Height, Needle Clip Position.

    Then, note down the existing setup you are starting with.

    First, you want to make sure you have the right main jet in there. The jet that gives you the highest top speed, WOT, in a gear is the right one. Also note if the bike runs harder, WOT, at low engine temps and softens as temps rise. This will indicate you are too rich. The opposite is true if it's slower when cooler than when hot. Make your changes one jet size at a time, maintaining the stagger the stock jets had. Main jet stagger is the richening of the inner two cylinders on an inline 4 or the rear cylinder on a twin. This is to help those hotter cylinders stay cooler.

    Once you have the right jet in place, the rest follows from that so, make sure it's right. Let's move to the opposite end of the running spectrum and work on the pilot jets and screws. Some jet kits come with pilot jets, some don't. There is a bit of "play it by ear" here. Usually, if the manufacturer wants a new pilot jet installed, it's ok to do it. If the bike is exceptionally soggy off the bottom and adjusting the pilot screws does little or nothing, go back to the stock pilot jets, which will be leaner, in most cases.

    Pilot screw position affects the engine throughout it's operating range. Blip the throttle LIGHTLY and watch it's response. If it hangs up before dropping to the factory idle specification, screw the pilot screws in, in 1/4 turn increments, until it drops straight to the set idle speed. If it drops below set idle and struggles back up, turn the screws out by 1/4s, until it goes away. Take complete notes of everything you do on the chart you made.

    Let's move on to the midrange, now that we have a handle on the low end and WOT. The midrange is between 4000 and 7000 rpm on your average sport bike. Needle height is controlled by clip position on the needle. Raing the needle (lowering the clip) richens the midrange transition by introducing fuel sooner. This can eliminate the dreaded, and very common, 4-5000 rpm hole that many bikes have. The reason the hole is there is because manufaturers delay the rise of the needle as long as they can to meet emissions regulations in other nations.

    Lowering the needle (raising the clip) will lean the transition to the needle/emulsion tube enrichment by delaying the entry of fuel in the midrange. Lowering the needle is typically not what is required as the needle taper on jet kits is more accurately machined and less radical. Usually, a little fattening is required, if the bike is flat when the throttle is opened 1/2 way at 4-5000 rpm, especially if it runs strong below and above that. Once again add clear notes to your chart to document your changes.

    Next, let's move on to the last and most irritating aspect of tuning a jet kit: Float height setting. Float heights are adjusted as per the instructions in my previous article. Float height will tend to affect low rpm/high load operation because typically, float heights are too high in stock position. Low speed/high load running (WOT, 2500-3500 rpm) will be richened by high float heights with no corresponding high rpm benefit. Run the lowest float height you can without affecting high rpm, WOT operation. Once again, keep clear notes of where you are. Lower it in 1 mm increments until the performance window above clears and runs best.

    Lastly, wait for your engine to cool, pull your sparkplugs and give them a good clean and gap before riding. That is, assuming they are low mileage examples to start with. If they are more than 10,000 km examples, it's probably a good idea to change them before you tune the kit, to eliminate any possibilty of tuning around a slight misfire.

    When you pull the plugs, look at them. I mean, really look at them. Compare them with any number of charts in your manual or online for what plug colour means what. The plugs are your point men for trouble and will tell you alot, if you listen to them.

    I know it sounds pretty time consuming, especially if you have to yank the carbs for every change, but, the results are worth it in every corner or straightaway you encounter while you ride that bike.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    BCSportBikes.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #19
    Got Hammer? Array gixxstar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Princeton
    Bike
    The Mighty One

    polishing aluminum frames, wheels, other bits

    I've gotten some PM's over the last while about polishing frames and other aluminum bits yourself. I don't want to keep typing it out so I thought that it might be appropriate just to post it up here. I did my wheels, frame, swingarm, heel guards, upper tripple, and the gas cap. The frame was done on the outside only and I did not do the steering head as that would have required the removal of the forks.

    Supplies, not all are necessary(M=must have): Wet/dry sandpaper, 220-2000 grit(M), Mother's aluminum polish(M), Oven cleaner(all crappy tire), aircraft paint remover(lordco), 4x4 orbital sander or similar, Black and Decker mouse sander.

    Procedure: Strip off everything on the bike that might get in the way, plastic, etc. if your doing wheels or another part, just pull them off, remove the tire and valve stem or other attached hardware. Most frames and some other bits are anodized, that stuff is nearly as hard as the sandpaper. Cover everything you don't want to burn the anodizing off of, putting plastic over the motor is a good idea. Spray the anodized parts with the oven cleaner. It usually takes about 10-20 minutes to eat through the anodizing. Less time is better in this case, you have to be very careful with this stuff as it can do A LOT of damage to you frame and that's not something to piss around with. Start with something small if you are unsure. heel gaurds are a small and more idiot proof project to tackle before the frame. When the anodizing is corroded away, the metal will be a dull grey color underneath when all of the slag is washed away. It's very easy to tell but if you are unsure, try sanding it a little bit. The metal will be a dull grey and the anodizing will usually be a dull silver or white. If your doing a large part such as the frame, wash everything off thuroughly with a garden hose for about ten minutes after. If there's still a lot of anodizing left, try it again but let the oven cleaner sit on there for only about 5 minutes. It doesn't need to be completely stripped but the more of the anodizing off the better. It is a bitch to sand but will come off if you really work at it.

    Like I said before, if you're not comfortable, don't do it; you are putting a very caustic substance on a very important structural part of your bike. It can do a lot of damage if used incorrectly. I have been told that you can use a less potent acid but I am not sure which one. You can still sand it off but it will take a lot of frigging sanding. With any painted surfaces like the wheels, use the aircraft paint stripper. Time varies but it won't hurt to have solvent on the wheels for a long time. I have heard days and hours. The paint will just melt away or rub off after sufficient time. The rough casting in the center of the wheel will never come clean, don't worry about that. I just sanded the paint right off when I did it. Beadblastering could cut the time down a lot.

    Now that you have bare metal to work with, it's time to get down to business. Most wheels have rough casting in the centre section and some frames have rough castings in some parts as well. You can sand with as low as 180 grit, 220 is better. No lower, the scratches that you put in with the coarse paper will have to come out too. The Mouse Sander eats through this part of the job with ease, especially with the center part on the wheels as it fits into most of the tighter places. You can get away with sanding by hand and but your hands will hate you for it. Trust me, the places where the power tools can't reach are absolute murder. It's best to save as much time as you can on the easy stuff.

    Now that you have the rough casting ground down flat, you can start with the wet/dry sanding. Pour a nice bowl or bucket of water and put a few drops of dishsoap in. This is a very dirty job so don't use anything too nice. The surfaces where you had to use the course grit, use the next size up. I can't explain how to sand but one thing to remember throughout this, the more time that you spend on the coarser grit, the less you'll have to on the next one. Give up on a 'dead' piece of sandpaper. You can literally spend a few hours sanding away with a worn out piece and get as far as you would have in 10 minutes with a new piece. Wash the sandpaper and the area fairly often so you can keep an eye on your progress. I know that it says not to use the orbital sander to wet sand but that is an idiot proofer. Take the precautions not to electocute yourself and it can save your hands a lot of pain and do a very fine job. If you don't like the idea, buy an expensive sander made for the job or just do it by hand. 400 grit seems to be the magic number here. When you get to that grit, start sanding on the other parts as well. If you wanted to check on the metal when stripping the anodizing, use that one, anything coarser seems to do nothing but gouge the already smoothe metal. Do a very thorough job sanding from here on. I moved from 400 to 600. It's all downhill from here. If you do a really good job with the 600, you can move up to 1500 or even 2000 grit. 2000 grit is the finest worth going. I like to the 2000 by hand, just a personal preference.

    Now get lots of cloth rags, old holey socks, anything. Cotten works fine, so does silk. They'll all be garbage when you're done using them. Even with 2000 grit, the metal is still quite dull. The Mothers is what will bring out a chrome like shine. The Mouse sander came with a polishing pad that made the metal glow. I tried doing this part by hand a few times. You can do a nice job but I'm telling ya, the Mouse sander makes the difference between a nice shine and a beautiful glow. It won't glow right away but give it some time and the shine will come out. Use the rags to rub the excess off and keep adding more Mothers as you need to. This usually the part where you see if you did a sloppy job with the sanding. Every scratch and imperfection shows up here. If you are not happy with the finish, get back to sanding through the grits again. If the scratches aren't bad, start with 600 grit where they are, and work back to 2000, then try polishing again. Light scratches will polish out if you sit the polisher on there long enough. You have to make a judgement call of what will take more time. The longer you polish, the better it looks; believe me, this step can draw the line just ok and stunning.

    Your done. Congratulations! I just have to keep my bike clean and the metal doen't oxidize very quickly. I've riding in all sorts of weather and road grime, even a few dirt roads since polishing the bike. I just have to keep it washed regularly and it still looks very good. I'll have to take everything off and touch it up in the winter. Overall I am very happy. This is definitely a winter project. It would take a matter of weeks to do it again but it took me months to figure out the best way to do it. The gas cap looks great polished but corrodes very quickly so I don't reccomend doing it. Wheels are a BITCH. There's a lot of places on mine that the tools just couldn't do so it was mostly by hand there. Don't do wheels unless yours are easier or you REALLY want polished wheels. Anything flat is very easy to do and it's best to start there. SRAD frames are big, highly visible and flat. I did the large rough section at the back all the way to the welds that attach the steering head. It would have required further disassembly to get that done and it's not highly visible anyway. I took the swingarm off and polished the rough part as well. The frame doesn't have many awkward spots for tools so is a good place to start and looks really good.


    Ps: In the spirit of all of the other posts here, this is how I did my bike. I started with zero experience and got good results by following what I learned online and trial and error. I've added and subtracted a few things but only because they worked well for me. If you wreck yours or end up with a half finished project, tough shit. I take absolutely no resposibility for my advice. Like I said, this is a big project that can be very rewarding but the stakes are high if you make a mistake. If anyone has anything sees a problem with the procedure I've posted or has anything that they want to add, just PM me and I'll fix it if it makes sence.



  7. #20
    Anyone know how to sync. the valves? Mine are starting to tick and rather than take my bike in I thought I'd better learn how to do it. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanx, Tristan

  8. #21
    this is my...boomstick! Array CrotchetyRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    BC
    Bike
    click, click
    Quote Originally Posted by Teach me
    Anyone know how to sync. the valves? Mine are starting to tick and rather than take my bike in I thought I'd better learn how to do it. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanx, Tristan
    Don't want to synch them, couldn't anyway. We want them to operate in their own proper time. And ticking isn't necessarily a bad thing. Valves tend to tighten over time and it's when the motor gets real quiet that you have a problem. A loose valve is just noisy, a tight valve is on its way to its grave.

    This job can be easy or hard depending on the bike. A ZRX 1200 is easy, a Yamaha 5 valve is a pain. It's really just about careful measuring, note taking and lots of trips to the bike store. Honestly, I can do this but, all the fiddly crap that goes with it made me take mine is to BK to have them do it. Getting old, I guess. They have every shim they need, gaskets available if one rips, etc. It wasn't that expensive either.

    You'll need a really good set of angled feeler gauges for this, a decent outside caliper, and a good pencil and paper. You check all clearnances as specified in the manual and tighten or loosen those that are out. Problem is, most sportbikes use shim under bucket designs, meaning you have to remove the cams, support the cam chain, wiggle off the bucket to get at the shim. This is jeweller's work and can be fiddly.

    Get a manual and go for it, if you have alot of time on your hands. Good luck.

    Crotch

  9. #22
    spiff
    Guest
    Flushing brake lines is a long tedious job if you have to do it yourself. Get a friend to help and even better get yourself a vacuum type pump to pull the fluid through the line. Way easier and sooooo much faster!

  10. #23
    Moderator Array jeckyll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Vancouver
    Bike
    Kawasaki Land Rover and a liter-twin and another one
    For people new to motorcycles:

    Understanding Motorcycle Chains, Chain Wear and Chain Maintenance It's very very basic, but hopefully will help some get more life out of their chain.

  11. #24
    Greeneyes
    Guest
    REMOVING SCRATCHES FROM VISORS/WINDSCREENS.
    Disclaimer: i'm not responsible if you use 200 grit instead of 2000 and fuck up your 150$ iridium screen beyond all recognition.
    This applies to clear or maybe normal tinted screens(no mirror tint,no iridium),with light scratches. deep scratches=nothing you can do.
    Step1-tools&supplies-
    *drill+ 2 foam polishing pads( i made mine out of some firm 1'' thick green foam and bolts/nut/washer,cut with scissors,assemble and dress with a rasp file to make totaly round) or normal polisher with fine foam pad.
    * Sandpaper-2000 grit or finer. You can go in a couple steps i guess if you want to get a deeper scratch out(first1500-then 2000) i havent tried anything coarser than 2000. dont wanna put scratches in it that you won't be able to buff out.
    * Meguiars Clear plastic Cleaner+Clear Plastic Polish. both availible at KMS Tools and some other stores.
    Step2-wet sand the scratch-spray water or soapy water and lightly sand the scratch till you get it out or as much of it as you think is doable. *keep it wet and make sure you dont get any dirt or shit on the sandpaper-no point using 2000 grit paper if you get 100 grit piece of dirt between it and your plastic.*
    Step 3 Buff with Clear plastic cleaner-either soak the pad in the stuff or pour on the visor/shield- soaking is a bit less messy. Buff till you get the sanding scratches out.*wipe off with soft cloth when done*
    Step 4 Buff with clear plastic polish- final stage. same deal as previous step, just finer stuff for better clarity. its also more liquid so it will make more mess.
    .Buffing-stage 3 and 4 should be done with moderate pressure and make sure you dont touch anything with drill's chuck-gouges from that WILL be unfixable.

  12. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by CrotchetyRocket
    Don't want to synch them, couldn't anyway. We want them to operate in their own proper time. And ticking isn't necessarily a bad thing. Valves tend to tighten over time and it's when the motor gets real quiet that you have a problem. A loose valve is just noisy, a tight valve is on its way to its grave.

    This job can be easy or hard depending on the bike. A ZRX 1200 is easy, a Yamaha 5 valve is a pain. It's really just about careful measuring, note taking and lots of trips to the bike store. Honestly, I can do this but, all the fiddly crap that goes with it made me take mine is to BK to have them do it. Getting old, I guess. They have every shim they need, gaskets available if one rips, etc. It wasn't that expensive either.

    You'll need a really good set of angled feeler gauges for this, a decent outside caliper, and a good pencil and paper. You check all clearnances as specified in the manual and tighten or loosen those that are out. Problem is, most sportbikes use shim under bucket designs, meaning you have to remove the cams, support the cam chain, wiggle off the bucket to get at the shim. This is jeweller's work and can be fiddly.

    Get a manual and go for it, if you have alot of time on your hands. Good luck.

    Crotch
    i just wanted to throw in there , that valves don't typically tighten over time , they loosen , and the gap between the cam and the valve becomes greater , it is possible to set your valves at home , however most bike manuals wont give you spec for the valves simply because you can fuck alot of shit up in there . you should have a certified mechanic take care of stuff like that , escpecially if your bike is still under warranty .

  13. #26
    this is my...boomstick! Array CrotchetyRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    BC
    Bike
    click, click
    Eh, eh. They tighten over time because the valve wears the seat away and closes up the tolerance. That's why older engines are often quieter before than after a valve adjust. This is way more common on the exhaust side, as these valves run hotter and spring tension is far more critical to heat transfer.

    I have seen lots and lots of engine guts and tight valves on older equipment is very often the norm.

    CR

  14. #27
    Registered User Array J1k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    chilliwack
    Bike
    crf250r
    agreed,i just did a zx7r 98 and 1 exhaust valve was at .154mm and minimum is .22-.31mm crazy stuff,been awhile since i saw one that tight!


    Quote Originally Posted by CrotchetyRocket
    Eh, eh. They tighten over time because the valve wears the seat away and closes up the tolerance. That's why older engines are often quieter before than after a valve adjust. This is way more common on the exhaust side, as these valves run hotter and spring tension is far more critical to heat transfer.

    I have seen lots and lots of engine guts and tight valves on older equipment is very often the norm.

    CR

  15. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by CrotchetyRocket
    Eh, eh. They tighten over time because the valve wears the seat away and closes up the tolerance. That's why older engines are often quieter before than after a valve adjust. This is way more common on the exhaust side, as these valves run hotter and spring tension is far more critical to heat transfer.

    I have seen lots and lots of engine guts and tight valves on older equipment is very often the norm.

    CR
    my bad ,
    that makes complete sense , i usually assume the bikes is new as the majority of my experience has been on newer or lightly ridden bikes, never come across that issue. thanks for the straight up.i learned something today !!! cheers

  16. #29
    Registered User Array
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Richmond
    Bike
    Haven't bought one yet
    Tee Tee,

    I'm trying to lube my GSXR 750 throttle cable, but my Clymes (SP?) manual hasn't arrived yet. How do I remove the cable ends from the throttle housing? Or is that not necessary? The bike has the metal tubes that guide the cable into the throttle housing.

    Thanks

  17. #30
    Registered User Array Chumly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Vancouver
    Bike
    Honda & Suzuki
    Don't buy a Honda VFR 800 VTEC ABS if you are a newbie DIY'er!
    Last edited by Chumly; 03-27-2005 at 08:25 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •