A call for Simple Servicing Procedures
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 38

Thread: A call for Simple Servicing Procedures

  1. #1
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,

    A call for Simple Servicing Procedures

    OK kiddies. Time to help me write another Article Forum item.

    I'm looking for definitive procedures for the simple regular or annual servicing for the backyard mechanics or wannabe's among us.

    I got the idea for this while writing up the procedure I use for cleaning throttle cable and twist grips. Seems like there's a lot of this sort of stuff that keeps coming up. So it's time for a FAQ writing session.

    I'm not looking to replace the darn shop manual that you should all go and buy but rather I'd like to describe how some of the simple stuff can be done. Things like cleaning the cables, flushing through new brake fluid, new coolant or replacing an air filter without dropping the screwdriver down the carb. Minor stuff like that. It would be nice to concentrate on Spring Bike Tuneup items as a companion to Actionmechanic's Rider Tune Up article

    I'll start by copying over the throttle cable stuff...
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BCSportBikes.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,
    CLEANING AND LUBING THROTTLE AND CLUTCH CABLES;

    Start by stripping and cleaning and lubing the twist grip and throttle cable. If these are gummed up with old lube and crap then you're fighting with it all the time. The twist grip should SNAP back with a strong click when you let it go from max throttle. If not then your controls are in need of cleaning or perhaps your throttle cable assembly is shot.

    The cable can cut into the jacket over time and becomes stickier. But try blowing it out with some cleaner first and then lube it with fine oil before you toss it.

    ONLY use grease in the area where the cable ends go into the barrel of the twistgrip. The barrel to bar slip fit is usually greased but I found that this makes the whole thing too "sticky" and the grip sort of oozes closed. Now I just put a thin wipe of motor oil onto the bar and inside the barrel. Nice and snappy that way.

    Use a thin'ish oil for the cable. If your system uses the 90 degree bends at the twist grip then a bit of Moly bearing grease on the first couple of inches AFTER you oil the cable will help reduce friction at the bend and the Moly should "stick" to the stuff in there and offer some benifit over a longer time after the grease is gone.

    Get one of those cable lubing gizmos for blowing out the old crap before you oil it. Some brake cleaner or WD40 run down there first should clean out the old junk. Keep blowing it though and working the cable util it comes out clean. THEN oil it. The special cable oil in a pressure can is primo stuff for use with the Gizmo.

    When you reassemble it all be sure there is a plastic slip washer between the rubber grip and twist grip housing and that the rubber grip has a small gap so there's no pressure between the grip and the housing. The grip can creep/shift with time and this is often overlooked. Similarly when you're ensuring that the grip isn't rubbing the housing don't forget about the other end. Be sure the grip or barrel isn't jamming or rubbing on the bar end.

    % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %

    I just redid this topic for someone here while forgetting that I'd done this post way back when. There's a slightly different slant on this version. It may fill in some gaps....

    How to clean and lube your cable Parte Deux-

    First off go and buy a can of WD40 and a spray can of cable lube and one of the clamp on gizmos for sealing off the end so you can squirt the fluids down the cable.

    Now line up the slots in the adjuster barrel and lock ring with the slot in the clutch lever perch. Pull the lever and when you release it pull on the cable jacket to draw the jacket out of the barrel and slide the cable out of the slot. Work the cable end out of the lever. With the free play you should be able to work the cable end out of the lever down on the other end by the clutch activator lever.

    Now you can check on how gooey the cable is and look for any frayed strands. If any at all are frayed then it's new cable time.

    Assuming the cable is OK but it feels stiff then it's time to lube. Clamp the gizmo on the lever end of the cable and hook up the WD40 can. Blast some down the cable until it pours out the other end. A paper towel down there is a good idea. With some WD in the cable and coming out the other end I'll bet it's pretty black. Undo the gizmo from the cable and work the cable back and forth. Hook up the gizmo and spray down some more WD. Work it again. Repeat all this until the WD comes out only slightly grey or clean.

    NOW it's time to use the cable lube. This lube is a light oil only. Using the gizmo spray some of that down there until it blows the WD out the other end. Let the excess drain out onto another paper towel.

    When it's not running out any more check the cable operation. I'll bet it's delightfully easy to push and pull the cable now.

    Hook up the bottom end of the cable. For the top end put the cable end into the lever and then get some slack by using some pliers or some other trick to operate the clutch lever down on the clutch bell so you get your slack in the cable. Work the cable through the lever slot and put the end of the jacket back in the barrel adjuster and let go down below.

    Another trick is a small shot of chain lube on both the cable ends. That'll ensure that the ends can rotate decently in the clutch lever and down on the activator arm without putting a lot of bending stress on the cable.

    While you're at it put a small shot of the chain lube onto the clutch lever pivot bolt. Or better yet while the cable is out pull off the lever, clean the bearing and bolt and lightly grease the bearing in the lever and the bolt and re-assemble.

    With all this done the clutch is going to be as good as it gets. If it's still too much for you then it's time to start exercising with one of the spring gizmos to work on your grip strength. But I'm willing to bet that it's the cable and lever that's gooped up.
    Last edited by TeeTee; 04-25-2006 at 09:57 PM.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  4. #3
    Registered User Array jonesboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New West
    Bike
    '09 Bandit SEA
    How's this?

    <A HREF = "http://www.jonesboy.com/tutorials/plug_change/"> Changing plugs on a modern sportbike </A>

    It's not complete, got a couple hours in it this evening, let me know what you think, edits, etc.

    -Matt

  5. Remove Advertisements
    BCSportBikes.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Registered User Array
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Edmonton & Vancouver
    Bike
    2007 ZX10R
    great info !! i gotta manual but most of the times, i think that the "coles notes" version from the "tried & tested" are the way to go ..

  7. #5
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,
    Originally posted by jonesboy
    How's this?

    <A HREF = "http://www.jonesboy.com/tutorials/plug_change/"> Changing plugs on a modern sportbike </A>

    It's not complete, got a couple hours in it this evening, let me know what you think, edits, etc.

    -Matt
    Didn't read every word yet but DAYAM that looks good. Especially the pictures. VERY NICE WORK. I'll PM you with any suggestions I manage to find.... like minor spelling errors or dangling participles....

    That your site? Is it stable for the long term? If so I'll just link to it.

    OK guys. The guantlet has been slapped across our faces. I don't expect the same level of quality for every submission but we can't just let Matt take ALL the marbles home...
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  8. #6
    Registered User Array jonesboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New West
    Bike
    '09 Bandit SEA
    Yeah, the site's stable, go ahead and link to it. It's been around for about four years and I'm not too keen on letting it expire

    I don't think it was really *that* great, but thanks for the kind words.

    Hope it helps.

    -Matt

  9. #7
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,
    You're too modest. It is finely written and has an air of lightness what with the comedy relief comments that should really help those that are nervous about the whole concept.

    There ARE a few Yami specific bits that a couple of us should be able to help with. For example there's no heat sheild on either of my bikes. The air box seems to perform that function all by itself. The only other item is that niether of my bikes has those devil clamps that hold the airbox to the carb mouths. On both of mine the airbox just screws down to the carb mouth flanges and have either gaskets or O rings to form the seal that's needed. The screws that do this are accessable from inside the airbox around the carb mouths. Since the screws need to come out it's hard to cover the mouths with the towels like you show. So instead I ball the towels up and stuff then down the mouths.

    .... Guess I don't need to PM you with the suggestions now. That's all I found....
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  10. #8
    Registered User Array jonesboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New West
    Bike
    '09 Bandit SEA
    Changed.

    -Matt

  11. #9
    Registered User Array
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    West Vancouver
    Bike
    '79 Honda 500SE<- Joke, I have a nice bike
    Wow, and I thought that the VFR plugs were a pain.
    Would a step by step list of "my bike won't start" troubleshooting fit into this thread?
    Do the lights turn on? y/n, Does it make a noise? y/n
    It seems to be a very common question on the forums later in the season.
    -Sandworm
    Last edited by Sandworm; 04-21-2003 at 10:49 PM.
    AVATAR AmUSER and
    NOT A LAWYER

  12. #10
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,
    CHAIN REPLACEMENT TECHNIQUE TIP FROM OUR OWN BEAN

    Originally posted by Bean
    Instead of having to take the front sprocket cover off and whatever else you have to take off to get to the sprocket to replace your chain. Do the following.


    STEPS:

    1: Remove your master link.

    2: Paper clip your new chain to your old chain (to the end hangin off the rear sprocket).

    3: Pull your old chain out untill both ends of the new chain are accesible.

    4: Remove old chain.

    5: Line up one end of the new chain with the other end to mark where any extra links need to be removed. (Do this after you have moved your tire to almost as far forward as it will go) Mark it with a paper clip on the outer plate.

    6: Opposite of step 2.

    7: Opposite of step 3.

    8: Remove the extra links (marked by the second paper clip) by whichever means are available to you.

    9: Repeat step 2.

    10: Repeat step 3.

    11. Attach master link. Open end of clip pointing in the opposite direction of chain travel.

    12. Ride!!

    **Note: You can safety wire your master link by inserting a wire just behind the master link plate and twisting the wire on the side with the clip. Bend the twisted bit of wire (about 5mm twisted legnth) in the opposite direction of chain travel as in step 11.
    Originally posted by TeeTee
    For 8 an angle or stationary grinder works super well. A dremel will work if you're very, very patient..... and have a good supply of grinding bits.

    The same grinder will also work to remove a link of the old chain if it doesn't have the luxary of having a master link.

    Just to top the ice cream with a cherry clean the side plate of the master link really well with brake clean or other good degreaser. After you safety wire the keeper a smear of RTV Silicone sealer will help make sure there's no surprises. If you don't have safety wire ask. There's too many of us around here these days with track bikes. We ALL have more safety wire than we'll ever use. A few inches for your master links won't break us.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  13. #11
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,

    Aluminium foil to control oil during filter changing

    For the oil filter actually. So many bikes with the inline 4's have the filter sitting sideways and perched over the exhaust. During a filter change it's impossible to prevent oil spilling over the pipes requireing a nasty cleanup or living with a blast of smoke for the next 20 kms.

    I used to use bits of plastic bag to keep the oil off the pipes but as you all know bag plastic has a devilishlly perverse mind all it's own and results were mixed at best.

    For about a year now I've been using aluminium foil to form a catch tray or divertor over the pipes. It's easy to do and unlike the plastic takes and holds shapes like a charm. I haven't done it yet but it might even be possible to use a couple of bits suitably formed to catch and channel the oil so that you don't need to take off the fairing lowers for those of you that can reach the filter without removing the lowers.

    Anyway, I thought I'd share this little clean tip with you all. Happy foiling...
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  14. #12
    Registered User Array huck-jai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Bike
    yellow plastic ducky
    Good Stuff! I think there should be a FAQ page for this kinda stuff.
    - '05 CBR 600RR

  15. #13
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,
    Originally posted by huck-jai
    Good Stuff! I think there should be a FAQ page for this kinda stuff.
    There is. You're looking at one of them thanks to what I intend to be permanent stickies. And the other for more "fixed" material is the Ariticles area.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  16. #14
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Out to pasture in the 'Wack
    Bike
    04 Kawi Z1000,

    Fixing paint scratches or chips

    Here's one method that has worked for me.

    • Get the matching color (duh!) and use a very small brush or broken off toothpick to fill in the scratch with 2 to 5 coats of paint until the fix is a little bit thicker than the paint around it.
    • Let dry for a few days at least. Now it's time to sand it down flush to the surrounding paint. Mask off with masking tape around the scratch so there's about 2 to 3 mm of spacing all around the paint "blob".
    • Use 1200 grip wet or dry paper with water to sand down the "blob" until it's flush with the paint around it. A light touch and dry and look often is the key to success here. You need to dry it to see how it's going.
    • When it's down flush remove the tape and use rubbing compound first to further smooth the repair(s) and then polishing compound to start the shine coming back.
    • When it's not getting any better for shine then stop with the polishing compound and switch to a good " deep cleaning" wax. These clean thanks to a very fine polishing compound in them so they will bring out the final shine.
    • Stand back and smile....


    Metallics never will be match perfectly thanks to the particle density being different but for basic solid colors you can make it hard to find the damage this way. With a little luck and a fine touch you may not even be able to see the damage. If it's a candy color it's more difficult as you have to bring up the transparent color very carefully.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  17. #15
    Registered User Array jonesboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New West
    Bike
    '09 Bandit SEA

    Re: Fixing paint scratches or chips

    Got another one, brake bleeding:

    Flushing and bleeding brakes

    Got oil change and coolant flush in the pipe (pics are taken).



    -Matt

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •