A call for Simple Servicing Procedures - Page 3
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Thread: A call for Simple Servicing Procedures

  1. #31
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chumly
    Don't buy a Honda VFR 800 VTEC ABS if you are a newbie DIY'er!

    This isn't QUITE the type of posts that I was expecting here but I suppose negative advice is as pertinent as positive stuff.... *SNORT*...
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

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  3. #32
    More filling! Array stily1's Avatar
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    Okay Bruce, this may be a bit far down the path from the basics, but I just built and used a throttle valve synchronizer using tupperware, vinyl tubing, a latex glove and glue.

    And by the way, you can use this same device to synchronize carbs, even four of 'em because you first sync the middle two, then you sync each outside pair. If you back check this a couple of times, I'm convinced it will be just as good as one of those fancy tools for doing all four at once.

    First you need two smallish identical tuperware bowls, a large baloon (or a latex glove cut open, like I did), tubing that fits snugly on the vacuum nipples of your throttle bodies or carbs, some glue (rubber cement seems the obvious choice) and a drill.

    1) Drill one hole in the bottom of each tupperware bowl (see, now, you should have gone and purchased some instead of raiding the kitchen).

    2) Cut two lenghts of tubing (3 feet seems logical) and pass the end of each through the bottom of each of your bowls. I use a little heat on the end (lighter?) to flare the tubing, let it cool, then pull it back snug. A little rubber cement insurance/sealant is probably a good idea.

    3) Glue your rubber membrane (either cut open large baloon or latex glove) over the lip of one bowl, taught but not stretched. I used a rubber band to help hold it in place while the glue set.

    4) Now glue the other bowl against the first one, so you now have a rubber membrane between two identically shaped and sized air chambers, each with a tube coming out.

    5) Now for the hard part, finding the vacuum nipples on your throttle bodies or carbs, removing the little rubber covers without tearing them or loosing them....what's that you say.....yours are already missing......maybe you should replace those first and see if your bike runs much better! Back to the project at hand. Slip the loose ends of your tubing over the two nipples you wish to syncronize.

    6) Now run your bike and observe the rubber membrane. If it bulges one way or the other, guess what, you're out of sync. OR THERE'S A LEAK IN THE DEVICE YOU JUST BUILT. Check for leaks. Once convinced there are no leaks, follow your service manual's instructions for adjusting your throttle valves.

    In my case I struggled and cursed and finally got the tubing on the very hard to reach throttle body nipples on my '02 V-Strom (I refused to actually remove the tank and air box as my manual instructed) and ran the motor. AHA! I thought, it works and they are out of sync, because my baloon bulged to one side!..........but then there was smoke. SMOKE?! It turned out that my tubing was touching my exhaust pipe and had melted, causing a vacuum leak on one side of my device and giving the appearance of an imbalance between my throttle bodies. Once patched with a short section of silicone tubing I happened to have, perfect balance was indicated by my slack rubber. Er, MEMBRANE. So ultimately I convinced myself that my throttle valves do not need to be adjusted, and I'm ready to ride again. In the rain.

    EDIT: a friend offered this version:
    http://www.powerchutes.com/manometer.asp
    Last edited by stily1; 09-30-2005 at 08:43 AM.

  4. #33
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Riveting a master link with no special tools

    This has come up in a number of posts so here's what I suggest. It's in two parts since they were responses that I've cut and pasted here. So ignore the references to other posts that are not in this thread.

    Dremel or angle grinder to remove as per above. Make sure the sparks spray away from the bike. Then either the tool to stake on or you can use a ball peen hammer to rivet the end over as suggested by Sushi. Note about peening of any sort. Lots of smaller whacks instead of a few big ones. Big ones can bend the pin. Lots of little ones will nicely mushroom the end over. The taps should be only just a little harder than what you would be willing to hit your own hand with. Push the link into place and run a strong zip tie or wire around it and bind tight. Back up the other side of the pins with a second hammer head or big MF'n lump of steel to take the energy out of the whacks. Then tap tap tap tap tap......... tap tap tap tap.......... tap tap tap tap.... tap the unformed pin ends until you see it nicelly swelled out a bit larger than the original and the end is mushroomed over. Cut away the wire or zip tie and yer done.
    And part 2....

    Two people for the hammer option is pretty much a must.... or at least makes it a LOT easier. O ring chain or not, it works either way. BUt with the O ring chain it's just a bit more important to ensure the links are firmly clamped and bound so the bouncing of the hammer peening the end doesn't rattle the plates apart and leave a bigger gap than it's supposed to leave.

    Staking is a slightly different operation than peening by rights. Staking is more related to splitting and bending the metal to bind it while riveting or peening is mashing the metal to spread out through compresive deformation. For example if you use a straight blade cold chisel to start the operation by forming an X across the pin face then that's technically staking. Then the followup mushrooming operation with the ball peen hammer is... well.. peening. Hence the name of the hammer... You can buy ball peen hammers as well as cross peen hammers.

    If this is your first time doing something like this then practice staking and peening on a cut off 2 to 3 inch nail. Drive the nail through a bit of wood and then cut off and file square the point. Now start tapping the end of the nail with the ball peen end of the hammer and work at mushrooming over the end so it's larger than it started for about 1 mm down from the end but the nail is still straight. If you find yourself bending the nail then you're hitting it too hard. Lots of light taps is better than a few hard hits. If you can't seem to avoid bending the nail then your hammer is too big. Smaller definetly has it's place with this technique rather than "bigger is better".
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  5. #34
    oh thats the throttle Array svfox's Avatar
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    im just curious what the recommended way to removing general gunk (aka dirt/grease/grim/oil bits) from bits of the bike.

    ex. i have a pair of 04/05 gsxr750 brake calipers that im going to swap onto my sv front end, but thought it would be nice to get them all clean and shiny before doing so.

    if i took them apart could i soak them in something?? or just attack them with some engine cleaner + rag?

    anyone?

  6. #35
    Get outta the fast lane!! Array westvan_dude's Avatar
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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by svfox View Post
    im just curious what the recommended way to removing general gunk (aka dirt/grease/grim/oil bits) from bits of the bike.

    ex. i have a pair of 04/05 gsxr750 brake calipers that im going to swap onto my sv front end, but thought it would be nice to get them all clean and shiny before doing so.

    if i took them apart could i soak them in something?? or just attack them with some engine cleaner + rag?

    anyone?
    I dunno about the calipers but for getting chain grime off your rear rim the best cleaner I found is WD40. Spray, wipe. Then afterwards I go at it with Zep Orange Cleaner from Home Depot. I suppose brakekleen would work too but not sure how that stuff is on painted surfaces (if it dulls the finish or not).

    Anybody know what the best is to get some oxidation off the aluminum end caps of my muffler cans? I've got the Yoshi's. Someone told me once about some kinda acid wash like what they use to shine up aluminum boats. Tried vinegar but it's not strong enough. Also tried giving it a good rub-down with SOS pad but no love. Would polishing compound do the trick? Expert opinions? Seen a few posts on aluminum polishing but I'd rather not get out the sandpaper if I can avoid it.

  7. #36
    Chris Harder Array charder's Avatar
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    For cleaning grimy bike bits a low flash point solvent is recommended by owners manuals. Short of buying solvent from Lordco or Cambodian Tire, Kerosene also works.

    Any solvent or any oil based cleaner will contaminate your brake pads, and the only fix is to buy new ones. If you get shit on your rotors you can just clean with brake cleaner. Careful, it's pretty toxic.
    I'm not your buddy.

  8. #37
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charder View Post
    For cleaning grimy bike bits a low flash point solvent is recommended by owners manuals. Short of buying solvent from Lordco or Cambodian Tire, Kerosene also works.

    Any solvent or any oil based cleaner will contaminate your brake pads, and the only fix is to buy new ones. If you get shit on your rotors you can just clean with brake cleaner. Careful, it's pretty toxic.
    Low odor oil house paint thinner works well also. And many hardware stores also carry Varsol which again is an excellent low flash point slow drying cleaning solvent.

    I recently bought some orange citrus Revy house brand degreaser and it also did a far better job than I thought it would do. But with any of the citrus degreasers you need to mechanically clean it fairly well first. This applies to a solvent degreaser as well but you don't need to do as good a job as with the citrus options.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

  9. #38
    Moderator Array TeeTee's Avatar
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    Checking your bike's charging system and other battery issues-

    Checking the charging system-
    To test the charging system you'll need a voltmeter. These are available from Canadian Tire for typically under $30 for one that'll do the job.

    Get the bike running and hook up the meter across the battery on the 20 volt or a scale that will safely display up to 20 volts. At idle it should be higher than 11.0 volts assuming a battery that was just recharged overnight to full charge status. Rev it up slowly to about 6000 RPM. At between 2000 to 3000 RPM the system should raise the voltage to around 14.2 to 15 volts. From that point on it should not go any higher than maybe 15.2 volts. If it runs up to 20'ish or higher than your regulator is shot. If it doesn't come up at all then either your alternator coil is shot or the rectifier portion of the regulator (they are both inside the same block) is shot and you're not getting any juice being generated.

    But if it rises to around 16 to 18 volts but in a sluggish manner then your regulator may be OK but the battery is suffering from a high internal resistance. If this seems to be the case remove the battery and get a battery shop to load test it to confirm this one way or the other.

    Charging your battery-
    Motorcycle batteries do not like to be fast charged. But many car chargers will not provide a low enough rate to a motorcycle battery even on the low or trickle settings. Do not attempt to charge your motorcycle battery with a car rated charger unless you know it has a maximum 1 amp setting intended for motorcycle or recreational vehicle batteries that are similar to motorcycle types.

    Jumping your bike-
    If you jump start your bike off a car or other battery because it was totally dead do not be surprised if the bike runs rough and misses. The low voltage of the battery isn't providing enough power to properley spark the bike. This will last until the charge level comes up a little. Typically on the open road this will take roughly an hour. Bike charging systems do not enjoy the gross over rating that car systems do. Even then the battery may not be charged up enough to actually start the bike for a good 3 or more hours of riding at normal speed on the open road.

    In town if traffic is heavy do not count on the bike being able to charge the battery at all. Most bikes are running off the battery instead of off the alternator until they are running higher than around 2500 RPM for a typical sport bike. So if you're caught in traffic you're actually draining your battery instead of charging it. Keep this in mind if trying to struggle home with a jump started bike in bad traffic.

    Chargers and winter storage-
    Canadian Tire has a 1 amp motorcycle battery charger that comes on sale at least once a year. Keep an eye open for this and buy one when you can. At the same time pick up a lamp timer. When you put your bike away for the winter remove the battery and keep it in the house somewhere like the laundry room. Plug the charger into the timer and connect the leads to your battery. Program the timer to come on for 1/2 hour a day. This will be enough to keep your battery ready to go all winter but not overcharge and damage it.
    A backyard mechanic without a service manual is just like a hooker without a lamp pole.... they are both in the dark.

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