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Thread: Downsizing bike?

  1. #76
    Registered User Array bacchus40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    two feet off the ground..
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    MIAMI 998 YZFR1 '09 & RAIDER S XV19CSEL '14
    Quote Originally Posted by CoolDaddyGroove View Post
    Let me see if I can interpret B40's logic for you......

    Smaller bikes are more forgivable than larger bikes
    Riders may make the same mistakes on a smaller bike, but the consequences of those mistakes would be less noticeable, or not noticeable at all.
    To learn, a rider must makes mistakes, and the consequences of those mistakes must be noticeable.
    In order for a rider to truly learn, they must ultimately ride a 1000cc Supersport.
    you know what... i've re-read every line and I'd say i can agree with every point you make, on a sober mind... what tossed me is the limitation/ specific bike type... 1k cc supersport../?

    uhhmm.... not always a number game for me but, the shit you do on a bike better scare you fvcking straight and quick whilst somewhat limiting the OHH Fvckk.. consequences agreed

    actually Bandito above got it right!.. as he's got the definitions, correct partitions and slight differences in character down to a science
    Last edited by bacchus40; 03-12-2016 at 11:58 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Land Roving
    Life is too short to own ugly motorcycles.

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  3. #77
    Fastronaut Array Danke's Avatar
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    Sep 2005
    Location
    Danger Zone!
    Bike
    RC
    Quote Originally Posted by CoolDaddyGroove View Post
    Let me see if I can interpret B40's logic for you......

    Smaller bikes are more forgivable than larger bikes
    Riders may make the same mistakes on a smaller bike, but the consequences of those mistakes would be less noticeable, or not noticeable at all.
    To learn, a rider must makes mistakes, and the consequences of those mistakes must be noticeable.
    In order for a rider to truly learn, they must ultimately ride a 1000cc Supersport.
    https://www.google.ca/search?q=sarca...w=1536&bih=731
    Fill the house with bees.

  4. #78
    Registered User Array
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Bike
    GS7501
    A smaller bike is a ton of fun. You're natrually able to try lots of different riding techniques at slower speed and get rewarded for it. They're more manuverable at speed and easy to park.

    The problem with smaller bikes, is that they're a ton of work to enjoy riding. Long distances on smaller bikes can be more exhausting.

    I've ridden big bikes after being on smaller bikes and it's like sitting in a large comfy chair. The suspension doesn't hammer you since the bike is hefty enough, and shifting isn't a mad dash through the gears. The downside, is that they're hefty. Definitley not as fun running tasks in the city.

    There's a discussion here about 'learning more' and 'consequences' which I can appreciate to an extent. Small bikes are more forgiveable, bigger bikes push the envelope, but I really don't think that is a right way to view the arguement.

    You can challenge yourself in many different ways with a big bike or small bike. The enjoyment you get from those challenges and skill is completely dependant on how you want to frame it.

    I think this whole discussion about big/small is a bit moot.

    For me, what it all comes down to is agreeing on what is the most appropriate tool for the job.

    You don't see a watch maker with a framing hammer or vice versa. There probably is a framer out there with a tiny hammer that can sink a nail with a one inch swing, but it's his choice. It's a skill that he wanted to perfect and congratulations.

    I see motorbiking like skiing. You use an appopriate tool for the terrain you want to ski on.

    As varied as a mountain terrain is, there is a different ski for that. The best skiier is the one who can use one ski to work on all terrain, but they won't be awesome in all areas if they stick to that one ski or one type of terrain.

    I can own a ton of hammers, I could even afford a few pairs of skis, but I could only ever justify owning two motorcycles at a time at best.

    I've ridden small bikes like they were big. Fun but tiring. I've ridden big bikes like they were small. Fun but tiring.

    The funnest I've ever had was riding small bikes like they were small, big bikes like they were big, touring bikes like they were touring, and adventure bikes like they were adventure bikes.

    I only own one bike now. It's a real compromise, but I still try to have fun and accept the limitataions.

    I just have a small bike now, so I accept that I'll ride slower and shorter distances, but at the same time at the end of that ride, I'll feel that I've had my fill.
    Last edited by feffr; 03-13-2016 at 01:29 PM.

  5. #79
    Lee RideFar Array elevation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lower Mainland
    Bike
    ZX10Rawr & lots of small bikes
    you can also sell your smaller cc bike much easier than a larger cc bike. The biggest market of motorcycle buyers are 600ccs or less.

  6. #80
    How to ride Array Redhawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Princeton
    Bike
    CB 500X
    Reviving an old thread. Thought this chat was really well done.



    I've put a deposit on a 2019 CB500X and should have 'er in May.
    'I ride, therefore I'm not here.'

  7. #81
    Registered User Array
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Okanagan
    Bike
    nekkid
    Congrats Redhawk! Looks like a very fun bike.

  8. #82
    Original Pirate Material Array TMR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Vancouver
    Bike
    Suzuki Burgman 250 Supersport
    Quote Originally Posted by Redhawk View Post
    Reviving an old thread. Thought this chat was really well done.



    I've put a deposit on a 2019 CB500X and should have 'er in May.
    Congratulations, Redhawk.

    My wife had a CB500X, earlier model with the 17" wheels. Excellent bike for a beginner, pretty fun for an experienced rider as well. Reliable, great gas mileage, enough power, and super low center of gravity. Enjoy!

  9. #83
    How to ride Array Redhawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Princeton
    Bike
    CB 500X
    Thanks. The bigger 19" front tire and improved suspension for the 2019 sealed the deal for me. 'Out the door' price is under 10 grand which leaves me more spending money for accessories. I'm looking forward to this riding season. Cheers.
    'I ride, therefore I'm not here.'

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