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The "adventure" bike category does seem to have reached a certain point where popularity and growth begins to feed off itself, at least from what can be observed on B.C.'s roads.

It is right for the time as motorcycling is becoming much more mainstream, whether desired or not.


Tourbikes = older, mature, big and heavy, non agile, need grey hair, retired.
Cruisers = boring, macho, maybe overweight, prefer the leather vest look, vain.
Sportbikes = crazy, insane, immature, max adrenaline junkie, non practical, attention seeking, risk takers.
Adventurebikes = reserved, adventurous, independent, practical, thoughtful, well rounded.

Yamaha and others are missing out on this exploding market, imo. BMW can do it and for the $ because of mass production, have been doing it forever and do it well.

The Japanese have quite a few niche bikes that sell very few in N/A. It is puzzling why they (especially Yamaha) seem reluctant to enter what seems to be an obvious exploding market opportunity.
 

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BMW seems to have advantage in +1 litre adventure with use of boxer motor. Inherently torquey and low centre of g. 600-800cc less advantagous costs/benefits. The 600-800cc class is where, imo, Japanese mfcs need to refocus efforts in adventure category.

BMW dominates the +1 l size due largely to the boxer. Even if Japanese and/or Italians could go this route, it would take years to challenge reputation and experience BMW has established.
 

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BMW seems to have advantage in +1 litre adventure with use of boxer motor. Inherently torquey and low centre of g. 600-800cc less advantagous costs/benefits. The 600-800cc class is where, imo, Japanese mfcs need to refocus efforts in adventure category.

BMW dominates the +1 l size due largely to the boxer. Even if Japanese and/or Italians could go this route, it would take years to challenge reputation and experience BMW has established.
Hmmm, never heard that opinion before, I don't share it.

I don't beleive the success they have hgad with that model has anything to do with that engine, it's about the whole bike, what people perceive it to be, and how they imagine themselves to be, if they buy one.

I think BMW has just done a great job of marketing the image and supporting the models with a large aftermarket following, both my themselves, ads well as 3rd party manufactures.

They are selling image and a dream more than anything....a small percentage of those pricey kitted out adventure bikes see more a rainy day on pavement.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
....a small percentage of those pricey kitted out adventure bikes see more a rainy day on pavement.
True Dat....however a large amount of these types of bikes (from various manufacturers) are being used as dedicated touring bikes, and excellent ones at that.
 

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True Dat....however a large amount of these types of bikes (from various manufacturers) are being used as dedicated touring bikes, and excellent ones at that.
Yes, I agree with that for sure....pavement tourers, and nothing wrong with that, they work great.
 

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CHIA said:
Wow, 1200cc parallel twin putting out 110hp, 3-stage traction control, interesting.

575lbs wet, pretty damn beefy, but I guess that's with all the extras, including luggage.

I have a feeling this is going to be a pricey bike, looks pretty feature rich, and well designed.
Looks good and nice specs - but a little porky.

CHIA said:
I'll be surprised if it even comes to Canada or the US, so for now, just another neat model for the Europeans.
Hopefully the fact that Honda eventually sent us the Varadero means there may be recognition that there is a market here for these bikes. I think the Varadero is up for a re-do next year - even rumours of the twin being replaced with a V-4?

CHIA said:
Yes, I agree with that for sure....pavement tourers, and nothing wrong with that, they work great.
Hey, some of us actually use them off-road and on logging roads... pedalling as fast as we can :laughing

 

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Hmmm, never heard that opinion before, I don't share it.

I don't beleive the success they have hgad with that model has anything to do with that engine, it's about the whole bike, what people perceive it to be, and how they imagine themselves to be, if they buy one.

I think BMW has just done a great job of marketing the image and supporting the models with a large aftermarket following, both my themselves, ads well as 3rd party manufactures.

They are selling image and a dream more than anything....a small percentage of those pricey kitted out adventure bikes see more a rainy day on pavement.
Even if the percentage of adventure bikes see no more than rainy days on pavement, the hard core, long distances, serious, all terrain tourer has chosen the r1200gs over most others. In part because of marketing? Sure.

Taking a full laden 1200 off road is not most would consider possible or successful but an around the globe tour would include.

I think the boxer at 1+ litre has a lot to do with this ability. To provide grunt and power for ultra long hauls and to have a low centre of gravity to give agility off pavement.

I think where the adventure marketplace has most potential for Japanese is in 600-800, where as you pointed out, most see no more than a rainy day on pavement.

But no matter how good machinery, riding atop 600lbs on two wheels on rougher off road is imo for the brave, gutsy or very experienced
 

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Even if the percentage of adventure bikes see no more than rainy days on pavement, the hard core, long distances, serious, all terrain tourer has chosen the r1200gs over most others. In part because of marketing? Sure.

Taking a full laden 1200 off road is not most would consider possible or successful but an around the globe tour would include.

I think the boxer at 1+ litre has a lot to do with this ability. To provide grunt and power for ultra long hauls and to have a low centre of gravity to give agility off pavement.

I think where the adventure marketplace has most potential for Japanese is in 600-800, where as you pointed out, most see no more than a rainy day on pavement.

But no matter how good machinery, riding atop 600lbs on two wheels on rougher off road is imo for the brave, gutsy or very experienced
I think some of it's greatest success has been simply, the void of a serious competitor.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Yes, a pic was in order for sure.

Chia secretly covets a large adventure touring bike.

;-)
 

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Haha....well, as much as I like the bike, a recent mag I got, which tested it, was not as glowing as I hoped.

Obviously only 1 point of view, in the early stages, but was sorta hoping for more praise, given all the technology, and departure from Yamaha's run of the mill.

Time will tell, but either way, I'm sure too pricey for my budget :)
 
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