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Discussion Starter #1
So I've been thinking of getting a bike for hte last bit. I'm pretty sure i'm getting a 250 regardless of people i know telling me to go at least 500. However i'm wondering if the ninja 250 is the only street bike that comes in the 250 flavor... Does Honda, Suzuki or Yamaha even make 250s?

Thanks in advance
 
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There's also the Honda Rebel, which is popular with riding schools. Suzuki has the GZ250, etc. A number of dual sports like the Kawi Sherpa, too. The nice thing about dual sports is that when (not if) you drop it, dual sports are made to be dropped, and will suffer little to no damage. AFAIK, the Ninja is the only one that looks like a sport bike, but it really has more of a standard riding position anyway.

Lots of options.
 

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contradiction incarnate
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kanelupis has an older Yamaha FZR 250 for sale.
that would be a great beginner if you're looking for something that small.
 

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Formerly kanelupis
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There are other companies that make the 250 sportbikes, however they are not sold commercially here in Canada. To get the other ones, you'll have to get them imported. My Yamaha FZR 250 was imported for example, and is for sale at the moment.



In a message I sent to someone else about my bike and why it's a good beginner bike.

I would like to begin by saying this is the BEST beginner bike out there. NO JOKE. Many ads claim that THEIR bike is the best beginner bike. Honestly, I don't think 0-100 in 4 seconds is suitable for a beginner.

Why is my bike the perfect beginner bike?

It runs near perfect. It'd just been serviced by the dealer in January before I bought it. It doesn't really have any hiccup except for a slight power dip that I'll explain in a second.

It's light, so that in the event you nearly drop it, you can recover with a higher success rate than with a full on sport bike, and to a certain extent, the ZZR 250s. This is the lightest sport bike avaliable.

It's extremely agile. This is due to the light nature and the Yamaha signature handling. To this very day, modified FZR 250s are used in Moto GP championships (despite FZR 250 discontinuation a decade ago).

It's a sport bike.

It has a suitable amount of power. This bike is faster than a ZZR 250 and slightly slower then 400s of its class. Factory says 0-100 in 6.4 seconds. I've been able to do it in 6.5 seconds. While this is a lot slower than most 600cc sport bikes today, it's enough to beat most cars on the road if you wanted to. It gives good acceleration but the top speed of 140 maybe even 150 (given sufficient space) keeps you from fatal levels. It also means that such speed is only achivable on highways and not the dangerous city streets.

Learning is a lot easier. While you may gain confidence a lot faster, you also learn the limits quicker. My buddy owns a CBR 600 F2. It's got 90 HP and is rated to go from 0-100 in under 4 seconds. Yet, I've never seen him lean as much as I have leaned since I started riding in January (he's been riding for more than a year).

Finally, this bike will sell for more when the summer hits (as everyone else is trying to learn to ride then).

While it may not be as light as your dirt bike, it's light enough that you can actually use your leg to balance at low speeds if you're about to tip. Not so with a full size sport bike, all the balancing is done at the wheel. If you feel that you're about to tip on a fill size one, it's almost always too late.


Power band:

Just yesterday, I tuned the variable exhuast. Before it used to sputter at 10000 revs. I discovered last night, that the exhaust valve was still closed at 10 000. I readjusted the actuator cables and bolted it down. Today, on my way to and back from work, it felt almost perfect. There is still a SLIGHT dip in power, however it is indistinguishable in acceleration THROUGH 10000. It's when you sit at 10000 (at 90 kph in 4th gear) and then try to gun it that it dips for a bit before hitting the power band. Power beings at 12500 and ends at 15500 and the rev limiter kicks in at the upper end of 17000.

When racing a buddy of mine (he's in a car). He described my acceleration as a quiet for the first 2 seconds before the revs start climbing faster and faster until I hit the power band in 1st, which is when I pulled away from him. For a beginner, the bike will be slow at first. But when he starts learning to utilize the power band to it's maximum, you can be pretty damned fast.

On the inside, it's a 250cc engine controlled by dual carbuerators and tuned by Yamaha's signature Exup variable exhaust system (for more power below 10000 revs). On the outside, is a 1989's super sonic looking sport bike.

This bike really really needs to be seen. Pics don't do it justice.


(seriously, the combination of light weight, power/acceleration/top speed, handling make it perfect for a beginner)
 

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kanelupis said:
Yet, I've never seen him lean as much as I have leaned since I started riding in January (he's been riding for more than a year).
[/I]
Could it be that my wheel base is slightly larger than yours?:coffee
 

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How tall are you? If you've got the inseam for it I'd suggest the new KLX250 dual sport and then put on some street rubber. Cheapie motard and hell of a lot of fun. It's a whole different scene from the sportbikes but easily just as much fun.
 

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sushix2 said:
Could it be that my wheel base is slightly larger than yours?:coffee
Could be an F2 thing... I had a F2 for about 6 months, the thing just wouldn't lean confidently. I got/get more lean on my '86 GSXR and my '93 VFR.
 

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IslandDan said:
So I've been thinking of getting a bike for hte last bit. I'm pretty sure i'm getting a 250 regardless of people i know telling me to go at least 500. However i'm wondering if the ninja 250 is the only street bike that comes in the 250 flavor... Does Honda, Suzuki or Yamaha even make 250s?

Thanks in advance

Don't let people play with your mind.
A 250cc is a heck of a bike and will go fast...Unless you're 200lbs or more :)

My next bike will be no bigger than a 500cc. For city riding it's just better to have a smaller, more nimble bike.
 

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Jester666 said:
...My next bike will be no bigger than a 500cc. For city riding it's just better to have a smaller, more nimble bike.
For the same reasons I find that my dual sport old DR350 is far more fun to squirt around on in town than my Z1000. Light and nimble and enough power to Ginsu knife my way through traffic but without a lot of excess. For short town errands it's my weapon of choice just becuase it makes that sort of riding fun instead of a chore.

If you're looking for a fun and "sensible" bike I'd also consider the SV650 naked and the new Kawi 650R Ninja. Both are twins and both are skinny and quite short of wheelbase. Or again, if you have the inseam to work with it, a DRZ400SM.
 

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In the 250cc class, I suppose we only have the dual sports, the Honda Rebel / Yamaha Virago mini-cruisers, and the Ninja 250, eh?

Actually, I totally wouldn't mind a CBR150R either. It'd be more than enough for my purposes anyway. Too bad they are only available in Asia.

-Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #11
yeah i was looking at a site and they had like honda CBR250s and a bunch of really cool bikes but they were all asia only or some such jazz
 

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+1 to the FZR250

Let's just say that if I have the "che ching", kanelupis's bike will be in my garage right now so that I have a full parts bike to keep mine going forever!

I agree with everything Kanelupis said about these bikes. except mine didn't have the exup, and the power dips between 7-8k rpm instead of 10k.
 
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jpgreybikes does have CBR250s sometimes
but you're better off with the FZR250 since it is more power and slightly more common
 

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retired panda racer...~_~
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check the grey bikes thread... someone's RGV250 looks by far the best!
but for a brand new rider, is it worth getting a grey market bike??
well, there's already enough threads talking about the pros and cons of a grey market bike...
but i guess that unforunately only leaves two groups of domestic market 250s... the kawasaki ninja250/ex250/gpx250/zzr250 or the fzr250 (i'm thinking the TZR250... a 2stroke is not a great idea for a first bike)

I think your'e better off with these (ninja250/ex250/gpx250/zzr250 or the fzr250)

+1 to some of the things said above...
250s are agile, lightweight, forgiving, and economical
I could still get my ZZR250 up to 170kph.
But of course the downside to the 250 is obviously less power, and super light weight bike means you can get tossed around by high winds
 

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I was at Burnaby Kawasaki checking the the Ninja 250 out today, and I found that it was suprisingly comfortable. In fact, the size and riding position were almost completely perfect for me, and with a dry weight of only around 300lbs, it felt like something I could easily handle as well. The best part was, there were two brand new 2005 models in the show room, and they have been marked down to $5700+PDI+doc+taxes. There were also at least another 2 or 3 used Ninja 250's there, but I thought they all looked pretty beat up. Might be going for really cheap though.

Hmm... very tempting...

-Rick
 

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finally got a bike
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you say your fzr 250 tops out at 140-150? I have a 88 CBR 250 i've had it going 190 so wouldnt that make it the fastest 250 and not the FZR? plus mine pulls to 18,000 RPM. I would have to agree that a 250 is an excellent beginner bike i would have killed myself on a 600. If your lookin for a good 250 mines for sale if your interested send me your email and i will send you some details and pics [email protected]
 

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Traum said:
I was at Burnaby Kawasaki checking the the Ninja 250 out today, and I found that it was suprisingly comfortable. In fact, the size and riding position were almost completely perfect for me, and with a dry weight of only around 300lbs, it felt like something I could easily handle as well. The best part was, there were two brand new 2005 models in the show room, and they have been marked down to $5700+PDI+doc+taxes. There were also at least another 2 or 3 used Ninja 250's there, but I thought they all looked pretty beat up. Might be going for really cheap though.

Hmm... very tempting...

-Rick

there was an '05 Ninja for sale at Imperial if I'm not mistaken. I think it was around 5K$
 

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250s are a great size of bike. I've had a whole bunch but never the ninja (darn).

They are fine as long as you don't pack a passenger. Unless you are both lightweights.

My wife and I rode 250 Suzuki GZs to the Okanagon, twice, loaded with gear. They handled 110 kph well and we did have to gear down on steep hills but still kept decent speeds. Those bikes were great fun and talk about cheap to run. 70+ miles to the gallon and a good 300 kilo range on a tank of gas. Never had a moments trouble with either bike.

Kawaski's dual sports are good bikes too. The klr 250 was a tremendous bike but not sold here anymore. The Sherpa is its replacement. A good bike too. Someone mentioned the klx 250 too but more dirt bike than street.
 

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Oh, I have some good memories with the Kawai Sherpa since they were the bikes I learned on at PRS. Good power and very manoeuvrable because of the light weight. The only thing I didn't like about them was their rather narrow seat. My butt gets numb on them rather quickly.

-Rick
 
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