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Discussion Starter #1
Thinking about getting a couple of rear stands for mine and the GF's bike...besides the accessability to the tires/chain etc....what are some key advantages...im not interested in front stands as my security device would be in use.

Im told they 'eliminate the flat spots' but dont most new tires now days built to resist the parking flat spot??

also, having the rear jacked up and not the front, does that add extra stress/weight to the front end? (tire/forks)

Just looking for some food for thought here.....
 

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ease of maintenance. I dont think flat spots are a problem unless your talking multi month storage. There should be no added stress to the front end of the bike I dont think, doesnt really add weight to the front of the bike. :)
 

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Fastronaut
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Once you have a stand you'll throw the bike up for any reason, lube the chain, cleaning or polishing, most repairs. It is well worth it, & it won't raise the rear enough to stress the front.

A front stand that supports at the lower triple is really worth its weight too if you ever do anything with suspension. Rear is more day to day usefull.
 

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:) you'll live longer
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It will definitely shift a bit more weight to the front end. But prolly not enough for it to be an issue if you just park your bike like that.

I think anther advantage is space, your bike will be parked upright and take up less space
 

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Twin A
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If you're working on your own bike they are invaluable.
 

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What they said. Tire flat spotting has not been an issue for decades now. But if you let the air pressure go too low then it may have a bit of a thump for the first ride or two in the spring. Just keep the airpressure up to normal over the winter and you won't notice a thing. Being a mechanical nerd I tend to be VERY sensitive to anything on my bikes that is out of sorts. I never bother jacking up the bikes over the winter or put carpets under the contact points or any of that stuff. But I do look at them 4 or 5 times over the winter for signs of running low and pump them up if I see any. I have not had any thumpiness from a flat spot that I can remember feeling.
 

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V Lister
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for yours and GF's bike i would get a spool stand. like said previously if you like doing your own basic maintenance, they are really handy. fok i like my anaconda rear stand so much i bought two. it makes tinkering a pleasure. i dunno if they have anodized ''camo'' ones out yet:devillook
 

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I am the liquor
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I discovered the downside of using a rear stand is that you have to be careful not to knock the bike off it. One day I managed to jam the rear seat opening mechanism shut by sticking a pump into the storage compartment. I was wrestling the seat trying to get it off and pushed the bike forward causing it to roll off the stand. Since I was standing at the back of the bike it was impossible to keep it up and down she went. Doh! :(
 

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contradiction incarnate
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Ripster said:
I discovered the downside of using a rear stand is that you have to be careful not to knock the bike off it. One day I managed to jam the rear seat opening mechanism shut by sticking a pump into the storage compartment. I was wrestling the seat trying to get it off and pushed the bike forward causing it to roll off the stand. Since I was standing at the back of the bike it was impossible to keep it up and down she went. Doh! :(
I wonder if having it on a front stand at the same time could have prevented that?
 

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I know on my stand I have to push pretty darn hard from the rear to get it to flip forward. My bike's got some junk in the trunk though :)
 

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How stable the stand sit is related to how far past center they rotate. But in any event a good safety feature is to jam a 2x4 or something between the rear wheel and the arms or use a tie down strap around the legs and through the front wheel to prevent you being able to roll the bike off the stand until it's time in the spring. It's also a pretty good idea for even when you're working on the bike. One wrong lean or a bit of exuburent pulling on the wrong bolt and piff, splatt, tears.
 
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