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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a new rider and need advice on a problem I've been having.

Before entering a curve or during a curve on a road at higher speeds (@70-80km), we've been taught to focus on a reference point(exit point) to help guide us through the turn. However, when I do this, I find myself frequently drifting/moving off my lane position. What worries me is that many times I drift awfully close to the next lane or worse yet into the oncoming lane or divider.

What am I doing wrong? I tried using my peripheral vision to stay in my lane or lane position, but it doesn't work too well. Any advice or technique I should know about?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
if you use one reference point in the turn for a guide, you will steer to it. the closer it is to you the faster you will be off course.

racers use many reference points around a corner to guide them thru it.

http://www.turnfast.com/tech_driving/driving_refcpoints.shtml
http://www.rrmotorcycling.com/?page=http://www.rrmotorcycling.com/mags/03juli-august/savety.html
http://www.google.com/search?q=reference+points+cornering

there was a fantastic article and diagram done by mario andretti i saw a few years ago on what happens in a corner (or what should happen) but it now eludes me.
 

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we've been taught to focus on a reference point(exit point) to help guide us through the turn.
Careful. I think you may have a recipe for a crash there.

As you approach a corner you will choose a turn in and an exit point but you don't "focus" on them. Vision is not static.

Although I don't buy everything he says, Keith Code has written a fair bit on "planning" a corner and I think his book "Twist of the Wrist II" would be of help to you. He lays out pretty clearly the order of events when approaching a corner and all the way through it to picking the bike back up. Some riders may disagree with him on some points (like braking) but you really can't go wrong doing it his way.

I think somebody posted a PDF of the book a while back. Do a search for that thread.
 

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Mmm...beer
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When negotiating a turn, pick your focal point and set your lean angle and speed, and maintain that through the corner. If you find the turn decreasing/increasing in radius, you'll have to adjust. If you maintain your lean and speed the bike will carry through the curve. Give this a try. If you slow in a corner, you'll see the bike lean over more, and thus your turn will sharpen. If you roll onto the throttle, the bike will want to stand up, and cause you to turn wider.
 

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Vindicated
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Ya, your eyes should be moving along your line as you approach and move through the turn as opposed to one point. When you're exiting your turn, you should be looking way down road. Also usually in a turn your lane position normally changes going from the outside to the inside so rather than focusing on staying in your lane position, focus on making a clean turn in the lane.

Also, try to stay relaxed especially in your arms (and even more especially the arm that's not doing the pushing because if it's tight, you might actually be fighting the turn and having to overcompensate with the arm that's pushing).
 

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your eyes should be moving along your line as you approach and move through the turn as opposed to one point.
This is my point. Thanks JJ.

Think of it like as being on a date with a girl with big titties. You wouldn't stare at them would you? No, of course not. You would see them, quickly note their hugeness, notice your wood, then look away. You get a sense of them. If you stare, you'll get none. You'll crash and burn so to speak. Same thing on a bike. Sort of...

That's why I'm such a MotoGP star. Because I get a lot of vision practice by dating women with freakishly huge titties.
 

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They also taught you to counter steer. The eyes deal is just a little extra bonus. You don't steer with your eyes unless you're built rather differently from the rest of us.

Your arms are what moves the handlebars which moves the bike. Learn to use it properly and conciously. Get over this vision nonsense and you'll be far better off. Looking THROUGH the corner helps you steer a smoother line but don't let your eyes do the actual steering.

Some will say I'm the Counter Steering Nazi and they'd be right. Look up what I've posted in the past. Go practice... LOTS!
 

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likes.big.dbls.
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This is my point. Thanks JJ.

Think of it like as being on a date with a girl with big titties. You wouldn't stare at them would you? No, of course not. You would see them, quickly note their hugeness, notice your wood, then look away. You get a sense of them. If you stare, you'll get none. You'll crash and burn so to speak. Same thing on a bike. Sort of...
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Hahahahaha thats awesome. I love it. I will totally remember that when I'm practising my corners! :rockon
 
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