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Discussion Starter #1
Okay so I'm going over my bike which I've swapped the forks on from stock. I removed the calipers and have notice that just one of the bolts has corrosion on them. Not rust but that funky white stuff. I'm not too sure about those particular bolts but to prevent the corrosion I've always used anti-seize or loctite. What are you using on caliper bolts if anything?
 

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back on the street
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blue loctite, and safety wire, just in case.... you can remove the corrosion with a wire brush before hand.....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ahhh this is turning into a regular "oil" thread! Nice.
 

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LOCK TITE!!! Use it to secure the bolts. I lost a caliper once rippin up cypress, both bolts... Almost crashed. That white stuff isn't corrosion as much as it is the salt/de-iceing crap on the roads that is in the road water... it dries up on the bike, so when you're done your ride hose your bike off before you park it
 

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i hope your joking......just plain old anti seize works well.
Why would I be joking.... anti seize is just that, it allows the bolts to turn easier... I don't want any bolts on my bikes coming off unintentionally... I'm quite serious about the loctite and the safety wire..... I use blue loctite on almost every bolt I put in bike, car, truck, even at work......
 

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Eh Muh Gawd Becky!!
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LOCK TITE!!! Use it to secure the bolts. I lost a caliper once rippin up cypress, both bolts... Almost crashed. That white stuff isn't corrosion as much as it is the salt/de-iceing crap on the roads that is in the road water... it dries up on the bike, so when you're done your ride hose your bike off before you park it
it's just corrosion. trust me. this conversation has already been done. use the loctite.
 

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Happy Camper
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I don't know if I'd be using anti-seize on any brake/wheel components. It's basically a hi-temp greasy lubricant.

I had a car where the previous owner had put anti-seize on the wheel lugs and they would loosen off from driving around. Had to re-tighten them once a month.

I have used it however, on the caliper sliders when doing a brake job on a car. That part is supposed to move around and prevents the caliper from seizing up.
 

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Scorp, your wheels must have been flexing to make that happen. I've been lightly greasing my lug nuts for years without any issues other than it allows me to change wheels when needed without tearing the threas off of some rusty studs.

On my track bike I greased most of the bolts including the brake caliper bolts. I did this because I have to put them in and out a lot and I didn't want the bolts wearing out the threads in the fork legs. But of course we used safety wire. Oddly enough I never noticed any loosening at all that would have shown itself as the safety wire tightening up.

It's actually a fact that a properly torqued bolt that is greased or never seized will NOT work it's way out as many would think. If it does work loose it's always because one or both of the parts that were joined were flexing in such a way to work it out. And that sort of flexing comes from poorly fitted joining surfaces.

All the handlebars on my bikes (both motorcycle and bicycle) are held on with bolts that have their threads greased and I've yet to have one come loose at all.
 

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Make sure you do not use regular never-seize with aluminum parts. It can contain copper which will react with aluminum. The aluminum loses.

Ceramic based anti-seize is best. Grease or gasket sealer work well too.
 

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myside.yourside.myside
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Make sure you do not use regular never-seize with aluminum parts. It can contain copper which will react with aluminum. The aluminum loses.

Ceramic based anti-seize is best. Grease or gasket sealer work well too.
Good tip. I guess I'll be picking up some heli coils in the new year.... :/

Cory
 

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Happy Camper
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Scorp, your wheels must have been flexing to make that happen. I've been lightly greasing my lug nuts for years without any issues other than it allows me to change wheels when needed without tearing the threas off of some rusty studs.
They were on a little Suzuki Sidekick with a huge lift and big tires on aluminum rims. With the aggresive tread on the tires and the stiff suspension, the whole thing shook like a jackhammer. I'd also go off-road quite often.

Maybe all that movement and possibly poorly-conceived custom suspension/drivetrain modifications contributed to the loosening? :devillook
 

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Make sure you do not use regular never-seize with aluminum parts. It can contain copper which will react with aluminum. The aluminum loses.

Ceramic based anti-seize is best. Grease or gasket sealer work well too.
Good one. I use Never Seize all the time on any bolt I take off. Never looked at the galvanic scale to check the difference between the two. I will look for ceramic based now.

That being said I have never had issues with never seize type thread lubricant and put on all bolts that are removed frequently like boby panels, axle bolts seat bolts etc and the big guns that I may not touch as much like swingarm linkages, handle bar bolts without ever having anything come loose. Blue licktite for the bolts I do not want to come out like brake calipers and rotors, sprockets, engine bolts.
 
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