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Anyone into this?

I found a fantastic thread at another site I visit and I think I may be very interested in picking up this hobby. I havn't had an aquarium since I was a child, and man.. I had no idea you could do stuff like this.

Now this is what floored me:



Probably not the best example of something even remotetly easy to do, but gorgeous..

Some more here:
http://showcase.aquatic-gardeners.org/2005.cgi?&Scale=258&op=ishowcase&category=0&vol=1
 

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V Lister
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i have a 135 gallon tank i built into my recroom wall. right now its set up with ironwood, and amazon sword plants. along with a bunch of rainbowfish,clown loach, and parrot cichlids. my tank is fully run on timers it replicates light from dawn to dusk. the key to having nice plants is the correct lighting, the amount of lighting. and having fish that don't eat the new growth:laughing . some people who are more advanced even use co2 injection. i have had pretty good success with flourescent tubes , and really good filtration. i have a 72 gallon wet dry filter which moves 1200gallons of water an hour. its a very relaxing hobby, i would compare it to sportbikes:devillook
 

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hey that takashi amano's work. i used to have a 77 gallon tank modelled after his stuff. i like the basic principal about the natural balance between plant and fish and using species found in the same region.

it's not too difficult to grow the plants and keep the fish (co2, light, and nutients) it's the layout that's challenging. i got ride of mine because it's hard when you have to move, but yeah really relaxing hobby.
 

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i have a 77 gal with south american chiclids and plants (tough to do when your fish rip plants up). a tank like the one above would be a tank that would take a bit of work to get going and maintain. because an aquarium is a closed environment the chances of things going wrong are high so you have to constantly monitor and adjust the water but once you get the hang of it it's no big deal. be warned, like sportbikes it can be addicting.
 

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GoPro Inspector
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At first i thought it was an irish mountain side! thats so cool. I used to devote most of my time to tanks when i was younger, raised angle fish, fighting fish and had a comunity tank, a 130 gal with an arowana (sp) a oscar tank....i dont have the time for it now so i have a tiny 10 gal and I'm fine with that :)
 

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I don't find my fish tank relaxing. Just this morning I lost a female dwarf rainbow gourami. To heck with aquascaping, how do you keep the little suckers alive?
 

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That's some really cool stuff! I think I'll look into this a bit more. :thumbup
 

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The Comedy is in the Back
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auqascaping is wicked, takes ton of time from what it looks like.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm trying to determine how much effort is required to maintain the 'grass' on the bottom of a tank like that. I sure do like the look of it.

I think I might go visit the pet store shortly and buy myself a tank and some starter gear. I figure the quality of the tank I've shot is going to be difficult to achieve for a newbie, so I'll start off easy and see where my interests take me.

As for fish, I think I'll just get a few algae eating type ones, and a small/medium sized school of some smaller fish.

I'm finding the amount of reading required to even consider a lot of this is ridiculous. CO2 injection, protein skimmers, etc.. all for the delicate balance to keep your 'art' alive.

If I actually do this though, I'll be sure to post the results as well as more rantings.

And yeah.. Amano's work is amazing. I've read some odd things about him though - I mean the dude is literally obsessed with it being more of a 'painting' than a living aquarium; having his team of farmers trim the tanks each day and such. Not that it's wrong, but just a huge amount of work.
 

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Probably the best single site resource on Aquariums I've found to date:
http://faq.thekrib.com/

One of the best resources on planted tanks I've found:
http://naturalaquariums.com/faq.html

I have a tiny 10 gallon tank that I've been trying unsuccessfully to keep plants healthy and alive in. I definitely need a better substrate, because my bumblebee catfish keep digging them up...

I would advise a much larger tank to start with (at least 30 gallons), as a larger volume of water is less likely to experience drastic fluctuations in chemistry and temperature.

Definitely not a pastime you can keep up with if you don't have a lot of time. If you miss out on regular water changes and chemical maintenance and cleaning, the results can be disastrous!
 

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jetshoes said:
I don't find my fish tank relaxing. Just this morning I lost a female dwarf rainbow gourami. To heck with aquascaping, how do you keep the little suckers alive?
are you doin routine maintenance, water changes, PH test, filter cleaning?

maybe there is something toxic in the tank? rocks, artificial decorations
 

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adamantium said:
Probably not the best example of something even remotetly easy to do, but gorgeous..
i think that most of the "grasses" in the aqua hobby are some of the most difficult to successfully grow. one of the most common is a floating plant that is passed off as a grass, but that doesn't mean it won't grow. if you look closely at them in the pet stores they are anchored to flat rocks with a fine mesh. you would lay this on the bottom with a suitable substrate and hopefully it will begin to spread out rooting itself.

you have a new nemisis, his name is algae...
 

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adamantium said:
I'm trying to determine how much effort is required to maintain the 'grass' on the bottom of a tank like that. I sure do like the look of it.
i don't think you need a huge a mount of effort, time, knowledge and experience matter more. there's definitely a trial and error learning curve, but you can mollify this by doing your homework. don't get stuck with a 4ft fish


adamantium said:
I think I might go visit the pet store shortly and buy myself a tank and some starter gear. I figure the quality of the tank I've shot is going to be difficult to achieve for a newbie, so I'll start off easy and see where my interests take me.
take a look in the buy and sell for a tank. if you buy new you could run up 3g's for a 100 gal tank fully equipped. used ones are going for 3 hun cause many people get in and don't think it will be a lot of work. even tanks that were just for fish(which most in buy&sell are) can be laborious so it goes to show that it takes some effort.

adamantium said:
As for fish, I think I'll just get a few algae eating type ones, and a small/medium sized school of some smaller fish.
in a tank that is "aquascaped" you'll definately want to do your homework BEFORE buying any fish. this can't be emphasized enough, the wrong fish will fuck everything up.

if you've noticed all of these types of tanks have few and small fish, big fish will make short work of your plants. big fish also eat alot and therefore produce alot of waste that must be dealt with and in a closed environment it can have a dramatic and negative impact on water quality. routine water changes are the single most important thing you can do to keep a tank healthy, everthing else falls far back in importance.

you'll want to get a Crossocheilus siamensis, commonly know as the siamese algae eater, this is the king of algea eaters rivaled only by plecos. this guy eats all types and is the only one known to eat black brush algea. there are other fish sold under the same name which look very similar, avoid these fish as they are inferior algae control. now if i could only get my oscar and terror to stop eating them :rolleyes

Algae Eating Cyprinids from Thailand and Neighboring Areas

depending also on the tank setup and plants you also might want to get a bristle nose pleco. they are said to be excellent algae control yet do not eat your plants.

adamantium said:
I'm finding the amount of reading required to even consider a lot of this is ridiculous. CO2 injection, protein skimmers, etc.. all for the delicate balance to keep your 'art' alive.
you only need co2 if you plan on getting really lush growth throughout your tank. because my fish root around alot i cannot get plants to grow well in the substrate so i put them in shallow clay pots. they are easy to move around when i need to get in there and do maintenance and cleaning. with smaller fish you disturb the bottom less cause less vigorous cleaning is required and there is no interference from big fish so the plants can take hold.

by the time you finish reading you'll have the equivalent of a biology degree :surrender

protein skimmers are mostly for salt water tanks.


adamantium said:
If I actually do this though, I'll be sure to post the results as well as more rantings.
10-4. one thing about this "living art" is that it is ever changing and evolving.
 
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