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Speed Freak
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Discussion Starter #1
Is adding Octane boost to your fuel a effective performance enhancer or not? Is there any gains to be had or is it a bad idea.
Does anyone have experience with this?
 

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Just Another Enthusiast
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Stick with your manual's recommended octane and you should be fine. I beleive if you do a search for old threads Jim posted a fairly informative article on the the subject. The gist of it was that you should use the lowest octane possible without having your engine ping. So if you have have pinging at 85, go to 87, etc until the pinging is gone, that is your optimum octane level.

Help me out Jim, is this right did I screw it up? :)
 
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really???
cause i use 94 octane (supreme +) from chevron...
should i be using regular?????
its a 2002 F4i
if this gets moved cause in wrong thread...
please email me an answer if possible :)
 

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I'm pretty sure that you do not gain any horsepower from better gas. Your engine will be able to use the manual's recommended rating of gas, but anything over will have no effect.

If you do some engine work that raises the compression of the engine, then higher octane gas is in order.
 
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for those of you on the harrison ride, you'll remember i was forced to fill up at a "tempo" station...i thought because of the crappy station i'd put in their highest octane...it ran like shit after that...as soon as i could i filled up wth chevron 87 octane and it runs sooo good now...i think the stations have more to do with it than octane, but running the lowest possible without "pinging" seems to work
:D
 

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Jackie Chan's stuntdouble
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Yes, that is another problem with premium. It doesn't sell as quickly, so you are more likely to get old gas.

This can be more of a problem in places that have oxygenated gas. The oxygen that is mixed into the gas makes it go bad much faster than it would otherwise.
 

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Speed Freak
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Discussion Starter #9
So what you guys are saying is that even though your bikes are running about 11:1 compression that a lower octane is better. I dont think that I believe that. Why are all these racers using such high octane fuels if it does not make a difference or a performance gain?
 

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Jackie Chan's stuntdouble
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The compression ratio is one factor that affects the octane requirement. There are a bunch of others, but I don't know enough to explain it all.

What it comes down to, though, is that small, water cooled engines with carefully engineered cylinder heads have comparatively low octane requirements.

Racers generally bump up their compression ratio, which increases power but requires higher octane.

Note that it is the higher compression ratio, not the higher octane, that is giving them more power.
 

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Frost said:
So what you guys are saying is that even though your bikes are running about 11:1 compression that a lower octane is better. I dont think that I believe that. Why are all these racers using such high octane fuels if it does not make a difference or a performance gain?
Check the article I wrote.. All octane is for is to reduce premature detonation. If your 11:1 engine doesn't detonate on 87 octane, tell me what the advantages are to using a higher octane (especially since higher octane burns slower.)

Jim.
 

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Speed Freak
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Discussion Starter #12
You are Correct, I stand Corrected. Here is some information that I have found.Definition: A value used to indicate the resistance of a motor fuel to knock. Octane numbers are based on a scale on which isooctane is 100 (minimal knock) and heptane is 0 (bad knock).

Also Known As: Octane Rating

Example: A gasoline with an octane number of 92 has the same knock as a mixture of 92% isooctane and 8% heptane.
Before You Buy Gasoline or Petrol


Origin of the 'Higher Octane is Better' Concept
Higher octane gasoline did reduce engine knock in older engines that used carburetors to regulate the air/gas mix. The older engines could not regulate the air/fuel mix going into the engine as efficiently as a computerized fuel injector. A carburetor in need of adjustment could cause too much fuel to be mixed with the air, which meant the gasoline would not burn completely. The excess gas soaked into carbon deposits and caused a premature ignition of the gasoline from the heat of the engine cylinder. The premature ignition made a sound that came to be known as 'engine knock.' When this happened, people would change to the higher octane/slower burning gasoline to resist the premature burn, thus minimizing the knock. Upping the octane was beneficial then, but engines and gasoline formulations changed.

Since the mid-1980s engines use fuel injectors with computers to accurately control the air/fuel mix over all temperature and environment ranges. The accuracy of the fuel injectors and computers is based on using the recommended gasoline for that engine. Most cars are designed to burn regular unleaded gas with an octane rating of 87. If the vehicle needs a higher octane rating this requirement is noted in the owner’s manual and usually under the fuel gauge and by the gas tank.

Gasoline Factors That Matter
The quality of gasoline and the additive package usually affect the rate of engine wear more than the octane rating. Basically what this means is that it matters more where you buy your gas than which grade you purchase.

Regular Unleaded Gasoline
The recommended gasoline for most cars is regular 87 octane. One common misconception is that higher octane gasoline contains more cleaning additives than lower octane gas. All octane grades of all brands of gasoline contain engine cleaning detergent additives to protect against engine deposit build-up. In fact, using a gasoline with too high of an octane rating may cause damage to the emissions system.

• Gasoline and Octane Ratings - This article defines octane ratings and provides an overview of how gasoline in made.


Mid-Grade Gasoline
The octane ratings 'regular', 'mid-grade', and 'premium' are not consistent. In the United States, for example, one state may require a minimum octane rating of 92 for premium gasoline, while another may allow an octane rating of 90 to be premium. Check the octane rating on the yellow sticker on the gas pump rather than relying on descriptive labels.

• The Low-Down on High Octane Gasoline - Includes information about the inconsistency of ratings across the US.


Premium Gasoline
Certain high performance engines benefit from use of high octane fuel. For other engines, using a fuel with a higher octane rating than the vehicle requires sends unburned fuel into the emissions system and catalytic converter. This puts unecessary stress on the emissions system. For some vehicles, a rotten egg smell coming from the tailpipe signals use of too-high octane gas.

• What Octane Rating of Gasoline Should I Use? - A good general reference.


Leaded Gasoline
Many countries continue to use leaded gasoline, even though lead exposure has significant health and environmental consequences and the cost of switching to unleaded gasoline is relatively low. Although greatly improved, research indicates significant health and environmental effects from use of leaded gasoline remain even in countries that have switched to unleaded fuel.
 

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bc_bud said:
really???
cause i use 94 octane (supreme +) from chevron...
should i be using regular?????
its a 2002 F4i
if this gets moved cause in wrong thread...
please email me an answer if possible :)
FYI I run chevron 87 octane and it offeres the best mileage and most horsepower. I used 94 for a tank and the bike DID idle smoother but overall it lacked throttle response and was noticable slower. I like the 87 chevron and 87 shell. Arco sucks my balls though.
 

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Frost said:
So what you guys are saying is that even though your bikes are running about 11:1 compression that a lower octane is better. I dont think that I believe that. Why are all these racers using such high octane fuels if it does not make a difference or a performance gain?
cause all these racers are running higher octane, they're also running WAY more timing and more air (ported heads)

Detonation/pinging has more to do with other things than just compression ratio... the shape of the combustion chamber and piston top have the most to do with detonation resistance than any other factor. You want the flame front to be spread evenly upon ignition without any hot or cold spots... I believe the term for how the flame front spreads across the piston heads is called quench.
 

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Speed Freak
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Discussion Starter #15
Jonathan
What does your owners manual say about what grade of fuel you should run? If I remember correctly mine say that I should be using a minimum of 92. I would be interested to see what type of effect it has on the bike.
 

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ROAR!!!!!!
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... So confused... I have always been filling my 2000 R1 with Chevron 94. Can someone just please tell me if it's good or if I should go lower. And how low? And if I am going lower, do I need to put stuff in the tank or can I just start filling it up with lower grade?
Thx
 

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Devil's Advocate
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Just switch to a lower grade, your manual should tell you what to run and that should only have to change if you mod your bike a lot.
 

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Frost said:
Jonathan
What does your owners manual say about what grade of fuel you should run? If I remember correctly mine say that I should be using a minimum of 92. I would be interested to see what type of effect it has on the bike.
if your owners manual says to run 92 then you should run 92. Running less may lead to knocking etc..


My manual says to run 86 octane, I use 87 since thats the closest.
 

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Mini said:
... So confused... I have always been filling my 2000 R1 with Chevron 94. Can someone just please tell me if it's good or if I should go lower. And how low? And if I am going lower, do I need to put stuff in the tank or can I just start filling it up with lower grade?
Thx
whatever your owners manual says. the engineers of your bike put a lot of time and research into finding what fuel works the best.
 

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Speed Freak
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Discussion Starter #20
I Tried the lower grade octane and it seems that things are running a little better. I think there was a slight performance boost. Thank you guys for your input..it sure has opened my eyes on this topic.
 
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