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Discussion Starter #1
I have a battery that has been stored indoors hooked up to a Battery Tender Plus uninterrupted for 6 years now. I am finally ready to install it back into the bike. Does anyone have any idea if a battery can last this long or would it have exceeded its life despite being maintained by a Battery Tender? The battery is about 9 years old now.
 

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Did you hook it up and test it?
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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I would hook it up and try it...or take it to a battery shop and have them load test it..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I didn't realize that I could get it tested at a battery shop. My bike is currently in storage at another site so I haven't been able to install it or try it yet. Thanks for the suggestions!
 

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In my experience, there would be a high probability that the battery is toast. Even if the bike starts up with the surface charge in the battery, after 9 years the lead is going to be beat up so much that it's not even worth trying to hold on to.
 

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In my experience, there would be a high probability that the battery is toast. Even if the bike starts up with the surface charge in the battery, after 9 years the lead is going to be beat up so much that it's not even worth trying to hold on to.
What are your thoughts on lead acid specific chargers with a pulsation feature like ctek's. I agree with you that if you get 10 years from a lead acid battery you're doing pretty good
 

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I have a battery that has been stored indoors hooked up to a Battery Tender Plus uninterrupted for 6 years now. I am finally ready to install it back into the bike. Does anyone have any idea if a battery can last this long or would it have exceeded its life despite being maintained by a Battery Tender? The battery is about 9 years old now.
The Battery Tender Plus that I have is a fairly new unit, so I don't if mine has the same spec's as yours. But at least the one I am using, its charging algorithm is quite a good one for VRLA/AGM type of lead acid batteries (non-flooded, sealed but not gel) because it tries quite hard to fully charge them. If your battery is a VRLA/AGM type, and is a Yuasa or other OEM brands (brands of batteries that came with the bike when it was brand new), then there is a fair chance that your battery is still usable. Of course, there are other variables that we don't know about, such as the condition of the battery just prior to being put in storage.

Mind you 9 years is quite old. So from a reliability point of view, it may pose a problem (I don't really know), especially for out-of-town types of riding. And batteries are not that expensive versus the expensive of getting you home after a breakdown in the middle of nowhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the tips everyone!

The Battery Tender Plus that I have is a fairly new unit, so I don't if mine has the same spec's as yours. But at least the one I am using, its charging algorithm is quite a good one for VRLA/AGM type of lead acid batteries (non-flooded, sealed but not gel) because it tries quite hard to fully charge them. If your battery is a VRLA/AGM type, and is a Yuasa or other OEM brands (brands of batteries that came with the bike when it was brand new), then there is a fair chance that your battery is still usable. Of course, there are other variables that we don't know about, such as the condition of the battery just prior to being put in storage.

Mind you 9 years is quite old. So from a reliability point of view, it may pose a problem (I don't really know), especially for out-of-town types of riding. And batteries are not that expensive versus the expensive of getting you home after a breakdown in the middle of nowhere.
Yes, mine is the original sealed Yuasa battery that came with my Honda CBR. It had always been hooked up to the Battery Tender Plus during the winters before I stored it for 6 years straight. I didn't want to buy a new one if I didn't have to. I guess I'll take it to a place like Canadian Tire to be tested... if Canadian Tire does this sort of thing.
 

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Thanks for all the tips everyone!



Yes, mine is the original sealed Yuasa battery that came with my Honda CBR. It had always been hooked up to the Battery Tender Plus during the winters before I stored it for 6 years straight. I didn't want to buy a new one if I didn't have to. I guess I'll take it to a place like Canadian Tire to be tested... if Canadian Tire does this sort of thing.
Actually, I am still on the original battery too (on my CBR125R, Yuasa). That is a pretty good battery, albeit a small capacity one (scooter battery).

If you are only going to ride in the city about, and don't mind the inconvenience too much should it died, it could be a reasonable risk.

One thing that you can do after the battery has been checked out is to ride it for a week or so, and then check the battery voltage first thing in the morning before the engine has been started. If the battery voltage reads 12.7 VDC or higher (12.6 VDC is O.K. too, but not as strong and more risky), personally, I would use it around town.
 

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If you are only going to ride in the city about, and don't mind the inconvenience too much should it died, it could be a reasonable risk.
Interesting, I would be more worried about a weak battery in the city than I would on a big ride. Frequent starts, short rides, more idling will leave you with a dead bike; i just replaced a battery that was declared "a bit weak" at Edmonds but died on me a few times while commuting. Likely it would have been fine on a multi-day highway ride.

But overall OP, given that a decent battery runs you $70 or $80, that's pretty cheap for peace of mind. I'd just replace it and it's one less thing to think about.
 

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Interesting, I would be more worried about a weak battery in the city than I would on a big ride. Frequent starts, short rides, more idling will leave you with a dead bike; i just replaced a battery that was declared "a bit weak" at Edmonds but died on me a few times while commuting. Likely it would have been fine on a multi-day highway ride.

But overall OP, given that a decent battery runs you $70 or $80, that's pretty cheap for peace of mind. I'd just replace it and it's one less thing to think about.
That is the thing. A high current load test does not completely tests a lead acid battery.

The other point is, the O.P.'s battery is 9 yrs old. I just don't know enough when or how the sponge lead material, and the grid will fail at that age.

In your case, I am guessing, your battery was not 9 years old right? In your case, your battery just wasn't holding its charge well?

For myself, I would also do a low current load test. But most folks are not going to do that. In addition, I would ride around for about a week and then check the battery voltage. A battery that can't hold its charge well will reveal itself with these tests, and with the addition of the high current load test.

I revive weak and old lead acid batteries as a hobby, but not with 9 years old ones though. I also have a high current load tester. And I have seen for myself how a so so lead acid battery can pass a high current load test but fail on a low current load test. And sure enough, the lead acid battery did not hold its charge well and fail in service.

However, none of these tests will show how reliable the battery is going to be when a lead acid battery is 9 years old plus.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
But overall OP, given that a decent battery runs you $70 or $80, that's pretty cheap for peace of mind. I'd just replace it and it's one less thing to think about.
I was so caught up in getting another Yuasa battery that I thought I was going to have to spend $120+. And then I looked at other brands to discover that they are available in the $30-$60 price range as well!
 

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I was so caught up in getting another Yuasa battery that I thought I was going to have to spend $120+. And then I looked at other brands to discover that they are available in the $30-$60 price range as well!
I think mine was around $80 at Edmonds, no discount. Like most things I wouldn't go for the cheapest I could find, but I don't need a premium battery either.
 

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its amazing to me that most people have rarely if ever done this...
Well to be fair... a voltmeter isn't found in everyone's house. Nor does everyone know how to use it, or what numbers to look for. Kudos to anyone for asking a question.

I've taught enough hands-on tech type people to know that even the difference between AC and DC isn't common knowledge. The talents of many fall in other areas, and they're better served taking their bike to a knowledgeable person and no shame in it.

But bonus points for spotting the pun in the above.
 

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i started studying electronics at 14 so it has become a bit of a pet peeve... voltmeters are damn cheap, n' its not anywhere near as complicated as some would believe,
research is a dirty word these days which is a little odd considering how much information is readily available

the funniest thing is trying to explain folks that shorai batteries put out between 14.2 and 14.5volts, a battery tender floats at roughly 13.3volts, so you're NEVER fully charging your battery if you dont use their charger

even after seeing it first hand most are so uneducated about how batteries are designed to work they'll shake their head n' swear theirs is working just fine at a much lower voltage than required
 
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