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Rock bottom here I come
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Does anyone travel with a CO2 powered tire repair kit? If so did you buy it locally. A buddy and I plan a couple of 3000 km long weekend trips and I would like to have a small tire repair kit along for the ride just in case.
 

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I bought one last summer, never had to use it. Get the kit that you screw the co2 cartridge on so it does leak and you get full bang. Also note that you will need about 3 cartridges to do a rear tire and 2 for the front. My local Suzuki service man told me that info. It sure is a good piece of mind when you are out in the middle of nowhere and you can be a hero to your buddy if he gets a flat. Your local motorcycle shop will have them if not they can order one in for you. Expect to pay anywhere from $50 for the cheap kit to about $120 for the Lexus model.
 
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Use a glove with those co charges too. Them suckers get cold when they discharge.
 

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I'm new
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yes i've got myself a kit like that. cost about 30 bux at john valk bmw. it is a bmw branded one. works great!!!!
 

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Depending on the layout of your bike, you may be able to disassemble a small 12V compressor and put it inside a plastic panel on your bike somewhere (tail section?). Some of the compressors are very small and even smaller when you remove the bulky plastic cases.

;D
 

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Tried 'em. Don't use 'em.
Now my second choice, as you have to carry too many cartridges to fill the average tire up to a decent psi enough to ride to a place with air.
(i'm not going to re-start the "would you pay for air?" thread!).
My "issue," with these is simple; once you've used your cartridges, you're done.
That's why I prefer a small Canadian Tire or some such, electric pump. Yes, bigger and bulkier to pack around, but endless air, as long as you've got a battery, or fuel to keep it charged......
When riding with my fellow Goof Pipe Gang (relax, we won't terrorize your neighbourhood, we're all over 45 years old) members, I'm the designated flat repair guy, with gummy worms and an endless supply of compressed air.
'Tis better to have it and not need it.......
Pumps are cheap, about $15, and with judicious use of a Dremel or hacksaw, you can rid yourself of all that extra plastic that's unnecessary to the running of the pump. Now about the same same as a big fist.
 

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I dunno, I've never had success with those small cheap compressors. They always Overheat and start billowing thick smoke, They vibrate all over the damn place, and they Take hours to pump something up.


Ryan
 

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damn broken leg!!!!!!!
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They have a use cycle right on the side. Usually 1 min on, 4 min off. You can adjust this but it just points out not to continually use it or it fries. I find they work well for what they are.
 

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dunno, I've never had success with those small cheap compressors. They always Overheat and start billowing thick smoke, They vibrate all over the damn place, and they Take hours to pump something up.
True, and true.
They do take a long time, but as the aforementioned "cycle time," recommendation states, they will work forever.
They do take "small gulps," however, as long as the battery is good, and there's gas to charge the battery, you can fill up a few dozen tires.
Which takes considerably less time than exhausting your CO2 cannisters, then pushing/towing to the nearest place for air/repairs.
I never, ever get a leak, or flat, near a convenient repair place.
Oh, and the "vibrating all over the place?"
Draw a circle around it in chalk, mark off in a pie piece fashion, sections outside of the circle. place bets on where the device will vibrate to.
Gives you something to do while it pumps up the tire.
 

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Still defying gravity...
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G-slide said:
yes i've got myself a kit like that. cost about 30 bux at john valk bmw. it is a bmw branded one. works great!!!!
+1 - picked up the kit from Valk last year. I haven't needed to use mine but I have seen the kit in use they work well.
 

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I wouldn't think to carry the CO2 cartridges since it will take 3, 4 or 5 of them to fill up a large tire. And if your tire isn't even holding air very long, then you may only make it a few miles down the road and be right back where you started, but without air now.

Here's a couple of linkes about using air compressors on a motorcycle:

http://www.webbikeworld.com/Motorcycle-technical-articles/air-pump/
http://www.fjr1300.info/howto/tirepump.html

And an article on the StopNGo tire plugger:

http://www.teamiguana.com/Reviews/StopNGo/index.htm

Or the CyclePump:

http://bestrestproducts.com/celestia/products/cyclepump/

;D
 

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gixxer_76 said:
They have a use cycle right on the side. Usually 1 min on, 4 min off.
Guess I never bothered to read that part, lol.


Ryan
 

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Thumper 8 said:
+1 - picked up the kit from Valk last year. I haven't needed to use mine but I have seen the kit in use they work well.
I've used the kit and it worked well, but I neglected to replace the CO2 cartridges....you know the rest! :eyeroll

Come to think of it, I haven't put my air pump with the flat kit I have now or installed the socket to power it off the bike. :laughing
 
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I have used CO2 cartridges a few times to fix flats. I use a small vulcanizing plug kit to repair the hole and inflate with the CO2. It's worked great everytime, highly recommended that at least one person on any group ride have one.
 

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michael said:
Oh, and the "vibrating all over the place?"
Draw a circle around it in chalk, mark off in a pie piece fashion, sections outside of the circle. place bets on where the device will vibrate to. Gives you something to do while it pumps up the tire.
Too Funny :laughing
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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i use those crappy tire flat fixers in a can....you dont neeed the big one and it fits under my seat...on longer trips i bring my mountain bike pump and a tubeless tire repair kit also....problem with the co2 things is if you don't fix the hole right and you used up your cartridges your hooped....at least with the pump even with a small hole you can stop every few miles and top the tire up
 

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oooooh...good timing on this question.

I have been considering putting some sort of tire repair kit on my bike for the past couple of seasons, but procrastination came to a head this past weekend.

"Clutch", "dre" and I were coming home from our semi-annual ride to Squeamish and on Hwy 1 I noticed Clutch's rear tire going visibly flat. At that point we pulled over and as Clutch and I were figuring nursing the bike home stopping at gas station after gas station for air, along comes "dre" with the materials to fix the flat in a pinch. He was surprised the Cluthc and I; seasoned vterans of riding, didn't have our ouwn repair kits and he was right. Stupid.

We fixed the tire enough to get us to a gas station to finish the inflation to normal levels and got home no problem.

Here's what he had under the seat of his bike and which I have since put under the seat of my bike:
* Rasp tool
* Plug inserter tool
* 5-pack of tubeless tire plugs
* Rubber cement - small tube
* Box cutter - small cheapie one to cut the excess plug off
* Bicycle style tire hand pump - capable of 60psi. (I bought the shortest one
Canadian Tire had. Made for Raleigh with an integrated pressure gague.)

The plugs, glue and tools are taped together in a bundle with electical tape to keep them from bouncing around and the whole "kit" is in a large freezer baggie under my seat.

I avoided the CO2 fix-it stuff as the inside of the rim is a gooey mess when you go to change the tire. But I suppose it is better than being stranded.

Incidentally also undr my seat are:
* OEM toolkit
* Windex in a travel sized hair spray bottle
* Paper towels - quarter folded and stacked in a sandwich zip-lock baggie
* Road map of the lower mainland
* Disc Lock
* Electrical plate for use as kick stand puck for any hot asphalt/soft ground
* Ear Plugs in a plastic case
* Pen and Paper (you never know)
* Kleenex in a travel Pack
* Rolaids (have you seen the lunches we motorcyclists eat sometimes?)
* Clear lensed glasses (like the beanie helmet riders wear with foam to
reduce wind swirl into the eyes) in case I'm stuck out late with my tinted
helmet visor on. I can put on the clear glasses and ride with the tinted
shield up. I can see clearly and no chance of a ticket from the policeman.
* Coins in a plastic case (ie film canister) for parking meters.
* Spare medication in the smallest Lond Drugs bottle they have. You can
(ask them to do a label for this bottle as well - which is handy if you are
in an accident, searched at the border or just stuck somewhere longer
than expected past you med-taking time)
* List of emergency names, contacts, addresses and medications in a plastic
zip-lock baggie (in case I can't speak for myself)
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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BigRed said:
Don't they say right on the side not to use on motorcycle tires?

;D
ya...so whats the problem??? ha ha... actualy it says not recomended for tube type tires...but until you had a flat in the middle of nowhere like the Duffy lake loop you would do anything to get going....30 degree heat 100kms to the next gas station....no cell phone coverage....ur hooped....the tire fixer in a can was given to me by a nice guy in a car...it held air until i got into town to get it properly fixed....insist on a boot repair....it's a plug and a patch all in one...the goop washed out really easy with water...and like Murphy's law ever since i started carrieing a repair kit i never needed it......the small size is about the size of a pop can....
 
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