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No I don't, but you make a great point. I should get into the habit of nailing the brakes every once in a while to get the feeling. Thanks
 

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Dirtybill said:
It makes a big difference when you have to do it for real.
Yep, its fun to go about a 150km/h and then nailing the front brakes, sometimes I do a bit of a stoppie at the end. I had to brake very hard last year when I was following a bike that hit a wall on the side of a mountain, spit him off and the bike came towards me without a rider. Had to brake very hard and swerve out the way. Yeah practising panic stops is good but I havent practised doing it in the rain. Just remember to check for traffic behind when doin it:rider
 

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Not any more. Nope. Tried it once and didn't like it at all, no sir, not at all....... Gave my bike a boo boo......


Does screaming in to a 1st gear hairpin off a 4th gear straight count? If so I may get a chance to practice that tomorrow at Mission.

Oh, and it's not going to be the bike screaming but the rider inside his helmet..... :laughing
 
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Do I practice panic stops, nope, 'cause it's not a panic stop if ya aint paniking (redneck speak). I do practice hard braking (not from 150k, me a chicken) but I think everyone should get used to what it feels like when pulling hard.
 

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Wild Fx! I've seen your bike a few times. It's a wicked looking bike and pretty dam unmistakeable.

That sound is thumpy too!

I live on the North Shore too, where abouts are you?
 
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on one of the rainy nights last week or the week before, i actually went to my little locan cul-de-sac :D and practised hard braking, i figure i drive in bc, i better be used to doing hard stops in the rain (worst case scenario) :D :rider
 

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BMatthews said:
Not any more. Nope. Tried it once and didn't like it at all, no sir, not at all....... Gave my bike a boo boo......


Does screaming in to a 1st gear hairpin off a 4th gear straight count? If so I may get a chance to practice that tomorrow at Mission.

Oh, and it's not going to be the bike screaming but the rider inside his helmet..... :laughing
i think what bmatthews is doing is the best way to practice fast stops, its in a controlled environment and throughout the day you will get to practice it numerous times, cause its more than just practicing its getting comfortable with you bike so hopefully you WONT have to panic

ride safe boys and girls, i am hearing about too many people going down already
 

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Sewman said:
Wild Fx! I've seen your bike a few times. It's a wicked looking bike and pretty dam unmistakeable.

That sound is thumpy too!

I live on the North Shore too, where abouts are you?
:D thanks bud!!
I live near the super store Mt.Seymour parkway
You should come ride with us (V.I):spinsmile
 

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Awesome, I live in Lynn Valley. From where I live, I could probably hop on the cut and be at your place in less than a minute!

Where the heck did you get that bike anyways? I saw one alot like yours at Carter Honda.

We'll go riding this week sometime. I've got time.
 

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Slideways
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My bud was buying a KTM supermoto at carter honda and I built my bike with lotso parts from the UK
So we will ride :D
When the V.I gets together we ride all over and we are all buying Comunicators so we can beat the law with eyes front and rear of the pack. I need yer PH# This is mine 924-6879 kevin is my name
 

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Kit said:


i think what bmatthews is doing is the best way to practice fast stops, its in a controlled environment and throughout the day you will get to practice it numerous times, cause its more than just practicing its getting comfortable with you bike so hopefully you WONT have to panic

ride safe boys and girls, i am hearing about too many people going down already

I also agree that track days help a rider get comfortable with slowing down from very high speeds to relatively slows speeds, but there's that extra 2-3 second part that's not practiced on the track and that's the actual stopping. Once a season I usually go to a empty parking lot and accelerate to traffic speeds and practice coming to a full stop as fast and hard as possible. No stoppies, no skidding - just hard, fast, controlled stops. I also practice hard braking when I'm slightly leaned over too.
 

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Almost40 said:



Once a season I usually go to a empty parking lot and accelerate to traffic speeds and practice coming to a full stop as fast and hard as possible. No stoppies, no skidding - just hard, fast, controlled stops. I also practice hard braking when I'm slightly leaned over too.
Kudos!:) I believe that this is an important distinction to make. IMHO, it's obvious that skills learned in track days make us better street riders, but there is an important difference between a street rider and a track rider/ racer/ wannabe racer (me!):D In order to become a better and safer street rider, we need to practice the skills which we may be called upon to exercise in the course of our daily riding. This includes panic stops, to a full stop, in all conditions on all the shitty street trash we can find (painted lines, manhole covers, rock and oil strewn (is that a word?)intersections, etc)

Not to flame anyone, I'm still a rookie here myself, but I've never seen a brake marker on the street!:laughing

So do I practice panic stops? You bet your ass I do, Sally.;)
 
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I did a little bit this season, I need to freshen up again.. highspeed/slowspeed stops should be a requirement in BC :p
 

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yup, I plan on doing some soon, plus going to try different combinations of how much front rear and downshift, basically I made 3 mistakes last friday when I low sided:

#1 - I target fixated

#2 - I didn't make up my mind, stop/take the turn/stop/take the
turn/stop....damn gravel

#3 - I didn't stop quick enough,
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Krunk said:


Kudos!:) I believe that this is an important distinction to make. IMHO, it's obvious that skills learned in track days make us better street riders, but there is an important difference between a street rider and a track rider/ racer/ wannabe racer (me!):D In order to become a better and safer street rider, we need to practice the skills which we may be called upon to exercise in the course of our daily riding. This includes panic stops, to a full stop, in all conditions on all the shitty street trash we can find (painted lines, manhole covers, rock and oil strewn (is that a word?)intersections, etc)

Not to flame anyone, I'm still a rookie here myself, but I've never seen a brake marker on the street!:laughing

So do I practice panic stops? You bet your ass I do, Sally.;)
I agree, the track is a controlled environment. The street isn't. I found that a lot of dirt biking improved my confidence, sense of balance and instead of having that sudden surge of fear when something unexpected happens, now it seems I have time to correct it or take evasive action.

Max Burns did an excellent editorial on how dirt riding improves your street riding.

The other benefits are excellent exercise, and I hate the traditional methods of getting in shape. You learn how to fall, without damaging the bike or yourself. You really learn how to ride while the bike is slipping and sliding. Throttle control, braking and body movement and position are also some benefits.

Plus, I think it's the most fun you can have with your clothes on.

We recently did a week of dirt riding in the Vegas area. Can't wait to do it again.
 

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One thing I wish I had done in my earlier riding years was purchase an off-road bike. I can imagine the huge learning curve to be gained from dirt riding just from my limited experience in downhill mountain biking. Now that my time on bikes is so limited, buying a dirt bike now might not be such a good investment. However on the other hand, if I can go off-roading twice a year, I'm sure I can still learn a lot. When I watch road racing on TV I can somewhat relate to the dynamics experienced by the pro-riders and say to myself "Yeah, I can do that -sort-of", but when I watch motocross I definitely say "I can't do that - no way".

BTW, where can you ride off-road locally, and legally?
 

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Almost40 said:
BTW, where can you ride off-road locally, and legally?
I can't afford the time or money to buy a dirt bike. Is there somewhere you can rent and (ideally) get a guided ride with gear, just to try these things out?
 

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Dirtybill said:


I agree, the track is a controlled environment. The street isn't. I found that a lot of dirt biking improved my confidence, sense of balance and instead of having that sudden surge of fear when something unexpected happens, now it seems I have time to correct it or take evasive action.

Max Burns did an excellent editorial on how dirt riding improves your street riding.

The other benefits are excellent exercise, and I hate the traditional methods of getting in shape. You learn how to fall, without damaging the bike or yourself. You really learn how to ride while the bike is slipping and sliding. Throttle control, braking and body movement and position are also some benefits.

Plus, I think it's the most fun you can have with your clothes on.

We recently did a week of dirt riding in the Vegas area. Can't wait to do it again.

ya i totally agree, i have been dirt biking since i was a kid and it is a huge learning tool, the best part was getting used to the bike moving around compared to street riding,

you become much more comfortable when your street bike slides or moves around on you, so you dont panic and grab the bars like most people would,

you guys are right the street is a different animal than the track but what i have found that helps me the best on the street is that i am used to handling the bike at high speeds so when you are on the street you react much faster and at street speeds things happen much slower

you have to remeber that emegency stops are very rarely the best thing to do in a situation, usually when you have to use it it is because of your own fault of not paying attention of following too close

emergency manouevers are often more effective such as hard braking and then steering or even speeding up,

many accidents happen because the instinct is to grab the brakes and stop,

so practice everything if possible
 
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