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. The R3 would even be good for Squamish runs. Yamaha did an excellent job on the 320cc engine, it pulls far more than I thought it could.
thats the exact bike i sat on... and! not gonna happen :laughing


dude you're tall as fvck how do you even fit on that thing...?

i felt cramped 6 ways from Sunday, and it aint even tuesday :evilgrin
 

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I think the best answers to the OP's dilemma are these:

For fun factor, riding position and lower insurance bracket .... You need a drz.
and

I think you're going about this the wrong way, you should upsize to a bigger bike.
Is this Parking lot in Pitt Meadows by chance?
:coffee

I used to ride an SV650S. Bought a CBR250R ABS a month ago, but did not enjoy riding it on the upper levels, pinning it and getting blown around. Even though smaller bikes make better riders, to get to the twisty part of the road, it's nice to have the HP and torque.
 

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I used to ride an SV650S. Bought a CBR250R ABS a month ago, but did not enjoy riding it on the upper levels, pinning it and getting blown around. Even though smaller bikes make better riders, to get to the twisty part of the road, it's nice to have the HP and torque.
thank you'!! for beejuz sakes its great to see some real world experience, even if it did cost you a few bucks...


smaller bikes make for better riders only because they are forgivEable... there is a limit to this statement, you kinda have to get in trouble b4 you actually learn something useful..
 

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thank you'!! for beejuz sakes its great to see some real world experience, even if it did cost you a few bucks...


smaller bikes make for better riders only because they are forgivable... there is a limit to this statement, you kinda have to get in trouble b4 you actually learn something useful..
You need to get in trouble before you learn something useful?

WOW!!

I've never tossed my leg over an sv650 ,but, that bike has a huge following and fan base. There must be a reason for that.

Having more power, brakes, or ballz, is not always what the goal is.

I kinda try not to get into trouble.
 

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You need to get in trouble before you learn something useful?

Having more power, brakes, or ballz, is not always what the goal is.

I kinda try not to get into trouble.
Let me see if I can interpret B40's logic for you......

Smaller bikes are more forgivable than larger bikes
Riders may make the same mistakes on a smaller bike, but the consequences of those mistakes would be less noticeable, or not noticeable at all.
To learn, a rider must makes mistakes, and the consequences of those mistakes must be noticeable.
In order for a rider to truly learn, they must ultimately ride a 1000cc Supersport.
 

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Fastronaut
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Small bikes make you a better rider because they don't forgive your mistakes.

Brake too soon; run wide or tight, miss a gear shift etc. They pay you back with a loss of momentum.

Do that on a bike bike (especialy on the the street when riding at 7/10ths) and you can just give it that extra twist of gas to catch back up and try again.

On a small bike if you loose 100m on the group you stay off the back and you keep slipping off the back.

I know there's a small core of MotoGP and WSB riders on here who always are on the limit & were out riding at 110% and they missed the factory call up when it came.

This advice isn't for them; they're still out there winning the S2S every weekend. The small bike advice is for the other peeps.
 

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Small bikes make you a better rider because they don't forgive your mistakes.

Brake too soon; run wide or tight, miss a gear shift etc. They pay you back with a loss of momentum.

Do that on a bike bike (especialy on the the street when riding at 7/10ths) and you can just give it that extra twist of gas to catch back up and try again.

On a small bike if you loose 100m on the group you stay off the back and you keep slipping off the back.

I know there's a small core of MotoGP and WSB riders on here who always are on the limit & were out riding at 110% and they missed the factory call up when it came.

This advice isn't for them; they're still out there winning the S2S every weekend. The small bike advice is for the other peeps.
Stop with your tirade, Tugboat.
 

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You need to get in trouble before you learn something useful?

WOW!!

I've never tossed my leg over an sv650 ,but, that bike has a huge following and fan base. There must be a reason for that.
.
i was not talking about the 650, yes it has a great following and apparently a great bike.. my statement was more towards the new 300cc class.
i say shite sometimes cause it looks good in print, obviously we dont go out there looking to get in trouble.. at least not so you can learn new tricks
in my experience playing it seemingly safe with much smaller bikes leads to false confidence... there are hundreds of riders who can claim thousands of miles of seat time
year in and year out.. yet you ride with them in anything that is technically challenging n' they fold, going straight & twisting the throttle teaches you very little and aint that difficult to do ..

thats all i mean, we see it on the forums all the time as well, folks with a scooter or any of several 300cc bikes for 2 seasons and suddenly they think they're ready to go mach II on a decked out R1 or BMW s1krr..

i wonder if they even seen a thing above 6500rpms on their current ride, commuting; where and how you learn your skills matters
just as much if not more so than how small the stupid bike is :laughing

Smaller bikes are more forgivable than larger bikes
Riders may make the same mistakes on a smaller bike, but the consequences of those mistakes would be less noticeable, or not noticeable at all.
what is noticeable to you, and may teach you something based on your skill level may not even register on me, its all very relative and specific to each rider

also not entirely correct, but yes i do believe you can get away with certain stuff on smaller bikes because of their size and weight..
you get an OH shit moment and swear to never do it again... which is where i believe smaller bikes are more forgivable... I
fvcked up on my 1st R6 going 'round a turn too damn fast and i had to draw upon years of (experience) riding dirt to save my arse.
It would have been much tougher to come out the other end had I been riding an R1 and green as i was to street bikes..

i've never been one to recommend a larger bike just so you can learn, in fact you can see from previous comments i've advocated the exact opposite for years

On bigger bikes, small mistakes can turn into big fvck ups and some may not have acquired the necessary skills to pull out of 'em...

in those cases it is EASIER to learn and get to be a good/great biker if you move up slowly... BUT

assuming that every single bike out there, just because its tiny its automatically gonna teach you all you need to know?
uhmm... ever seen a 125cc blast down the tarmac for miles on end, throttle pinned n' rider doing all he can to ride straight?
oh yeah i'm sure he's learning lots there... you'll never go fast enough to put you in a situation where you must acquire new skills
which would turn you into a better biker.. on a super tiny bike if you give it too much throttle its very likely all you have to do is squeeze
the brakes and you're back; you're not about to see a crowd gather on the side of the street to praise your impressive riding skills when you
come to a stop.. sweat pouring down your face, yeh right.

the statement had been made just before my post, that you always just learn more from a smaller bike, and i think there is some limitations to that statement..
if you've NEVER ridden a street bike, a 320cc may teach you lots about riding but its got absolutely nothing to do with being small..
it has more to do with the fact that its only got two wheels, its inherently unstable, and you've never fvcking ridden one :devillook

of course, there are exceptions to the rule.. take it to the track n' ditch the mirrors, i'm certain a 320cc is plenty to get you into trouble n' learn a few lessons

Small bikes make you a better rider because they don't forgive your mistakes.
Brake too soon; run wide or tight, miss a gear shift etc. They pay you back with a loss of momentum.
i can agree with this statement, but not everybody is really worried about loosing momentum when you're street riding,

you're more worried about the drop on the other side of the concrete barrier

I know there's a small core of MotoGP and WSB riders on here who always are on the limit & were out riding at 110% and they missed the factory call up when it came.
This advice isn't for them; they're still out there winning the S2S every weekend. The small bike advice is for the other peeps.
this is a lot closer to what i mean... but i wouldn't wanna let it go to their heads... the small bike advice is generally reserved for those who
have very little to no experience.. the rest may very well be bored shitless
 

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So is this myth busted? Small bike no good, no how, no way?
125cc thumper = masturbation
250cc twin to 390cc thumper = handjob
400cc twin to 650cc v twin = blowjob
600cc inline 4 to 899 twin = intercourse with a rubber
1000cc vtwin and larger, 1000cc inline 4 = intercourse with no rubber
 

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Let me see if I can interpret B40's logic for you......

Smaller bikes are more forgivable than larger bikes
Riders may make the same mistakes on a smaller bike, but the consequences of those mistakes would be less noticeable, or not noticeable at all.
To learn, a rider must makes mistakes, and the consequences of those mistakes must be noticeable.
In order for a rider to truly learn, they must ultimately ride a 1000cc Supersport.
There! It's finally been explained! Quicker learning with 150 hp...!
 

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Let me see if I can interpret B40's logic for you......

Smaller bikes are more forgivable than larger bikes
Riders may make the same mistakes on a smaller bike, but the consequences of those mistakes would be less noticeable, or not noticeable at all.
To learn, a rider must makes mistakes, and the consequences of those mistakes must be noticeable.
In order for a rider to truly learn, they must ultimately ride a 1000cc Supersport.
you know what... i've re-read every line and I'd say i can agree with every point you make, on a sober mind... what tossed me is the limitation/ specific bike type... 1k cc supersport../?

uhhmm.... not always a number game for me but, the shit you do on a bike better scare you fvcking straight and quick whilst somewhat limiting the OHH Fvckk.. consequences agreed

actually Bandito above got it right!.. as he's got the definitions, correct partitions and slight differences in character down to a science :laughing :devillook :ghost
 

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Fastronaut
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Let me see if I can interpret B40's logic for you......

Smaller bikes are more forgivable than larger bikes
Riders may make the same mistakes on a smaller bike, but the consequences of those mistakes would be less noticeable, or not noticeable at all.
To learn, a rider must makes mistakes, and the consequences of those mistakes must be noticeable.
In order for a rider to truly learn, they must ultimately ride a 1000cc Supersport.
https://www.google.ca/search?q=sarcasm+detector&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjw4PDFpbnLAhUOx2MKHfbcAisQsAQIGw&biw=1536&bih=731
 

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A smaller bike is a ton of fun. You're natrually able to try lots of different riding techniques at slower speed and get rewarded for it. They're more manuverable at speed and easy to park.

The problem with smaller bikes, is that they're a ton of work to enjoy riding. Long distances on smaller bikes can be more exhausting.

I've ridden big bikes after being on smaller bikes and it's like sitting in a large comfy chair. The suspension doesn't hammer you since the bike is hefty enough, and shifting isn't a mad dash through the gears. The downside, is that they're hefty. Definitley not as fun running tasks in the city.

There's a discussion here about 'learning more' and 'consequences' which I can appreciate to an extent. Small bikes are more forgiveable, bigger bikes push the envelope, but I really don't think that is a right way to view the arguement.

You can challenge yourself in many different ways with a big bike or small bike. The enjoyment you get from those challenges and skill is completely dependant on how you want to frame it.

I think this whole discussion about big/small is a bit moot.

For me, what it all comes down to is agreeing on what is the most appropriate tool for the job.

You don't see a watch maker with a framing hammer or vice versa. There probably is a framer out there with a tiny hammer that can sink a nail with a one inch swing, but it's his choice. It's a skill that he wanted to perfect and congratulations.

I see motorbiking like skiing. You use an appopriate tool for the terrain you want to ski on.

As varied as a mountain terrain is, there is a different ski for that. The best skiier is the one who can use one ski to work on all terrain, but they won't be awesome in all areas if they stick to that one ski or one type of terrain.

I can own a ton of hammers, I could even afford a few pairs of skis, but I could only ever justify owning two motorcycles at a time at best.

I've ridden small bikes like they were big. Fun but tiring. I've ridden big bikes like they were small. Fun but tiring.

The funnest I've ever had was riding small bikes like they were small, big bikes like they were big, touring bikes like they were touring, and adventure bikes like they were adventure bikes.

I only own one bike now. It's a real compromise, but I still try to have fun and accept the limitataions.

I just have a small bike now, so I accept that I'll ride slower and shorter distances, but at the same time at the end of that ride, I'll feel that I've had my fill.
 

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Reviving an old thread. Thought this chat was really well done.


I've put a deposit on a 2019 CB500X and should have 'er in May.
 
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