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WOW I did not realize that even driverless cars can drive like asshats :eek:
maybe if the driverless car was driving with respect to the other traffic the rider would have not tried to pass on the right ?
 

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Wanderer of the Wastes
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here's the thing;

somewhere, there is a group of young engineers pouring over this new data, considering how it happened, and what can be done to prevent similar events in the future. Perhaps a new set of sensors, perhaps better floating point calculations or an improved pathfinding algo - the point is, it will be reviewed, iterated, improved, and evolved.
It's possible this never occurs again in quite the same way.


Meanwhile, the human drivers do not learn, continue to wipe out the odd blind-spot biker, insurance rates go up, policing increases, and a bunch of bikers continue to get splatted - business as usual, carry on
 

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Medium Pimpin'
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here's the thing;

somewhere, there is a group of young engineers pouring over this new data, considering how it happened, and what can be done to prevent similar events in the future. Perhaps a new set of sensors, perhaps better floating point calculations or an improved pathfinding algo - the point is, it will be reviewed, iterated, improved, and evolved.
It's possible this never occurs again in quite the same way.


Meanwhile, the human drivers do not learn, continue to wipe out the odd blind-spot biker, insurance rates go up, policing increases, and a bunch of bikers continue to get splatted - business as usual, carry on
I think you hit the nail on the head here. Human drivers don't learn, or at best learn very slowly. Tech learns quickly and most critically; remembers and builds on it's existing information forever. There will be growing pains as cars are switched to full autonomy but once the kinks are ironed out I think the roads will be significantly safer for autonomous and analog vehicles alike. **
 

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Fastronaut
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here's the thing;

somewhere, there is a group of young engineers pouring over this new data, considering how it happened, and what can be done to prevent similar events in the future. Perhaps a new set of sensors, perhaps better floating point calculations or an improved pathfinding algo - the point is, it will be reviewed, iterated, improved, and evolved.
It's possible this never occurs again in quite the same way.


Meanwhile, the human drivers do not learn, continue to wipe out the odd blind-spot biker, insurance rates go up, policing increases, and a bunch of bikers continue to get splatted - business as usual, carry on
They should have already had that code written to deal with cyclists, pedestrians, and the other unpredictable road hazards.
 

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considering how it happened, and what can be done to prevent similar events in the future. Perhaps a new set of sensors, perhaps better floating point calculations or an improved pathfinding algo - the point is, it will be reviewed, iterated, improved, and evolved.
It's possible this never occurs again in quite the same way.
yes, on this I agree.. which is why I said, who cares really.. its 'learning curve' sorta thing, the biker
basically toppled over due to his vehicle of choice being inherently unstable :laughing

nobody got hurt, well maybe one feeling did! but only one. And it wasn't the autonomous computer's involved ;)
 

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They should have already had that code written to deal with cyclists, pedestrians, and the other unpredictable road hazards.
And they do to a large extent, but this is a unique situation. How many different unpredictable and dangerous behaviours by other road users can the engineers come up with at a table? Many of these will be learned through incidents like this.

I imagine the car considered the lane to still be clear as it hadn't left it yet.

What would be interesting is how to deal with it; based on the article the car could not continue in the other lane as the vehicle ahead was slowing, but now the space it was in is no longer clear. Even a competent human driver may have trouble with it, the motorcyclist may have made the situation such that the crash was inevitable. *
 

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Im interested in the first mass hack, where 50,000 accidents happen all at once.
Absolutely.*Automotive computer code has some solid best-practices for reliability, but as we've seen security hasn't been a focus. I'm sure that will change/is changing, but it will be a game of cat and mouse.*
 

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here's a good article, on related topics! no surprise here, it all comes down to $$. As in shit's finally cheap now! read below :batman




https://www.wired.com/story/2017-was-the-year-the-robots-really-truly-arrived/


The world seemed different this year, yes? Like something strange has been walking and rolling among us?
Like we’re now sharing the planet with a new species of our own creation?

Well, we are, because 2017 was the year that the robots really, truly arrived. They escaped the factory floor and started conquering big cities to deliver Mediterranean food. Self-driving cars swarmed the streets. And even bipedal robots—finally capable of not immediately falling on their faces—strolled out of the lab and into the real world. The machines are here, and it’s an exhilarating time indeed. Like, now Atlas the humanoid robot can do backflips. Backflips!.

“2017 has been an amazing year for robotics,” says roboticist Sebastian Thrun, a pioneer of the self-driving car. “Why 2017? Why did it take us so long?”

Well, it was a confluence of factors, namely the cheapening of sophisticated hardware combined with better brains. “In the past, in robotics we had not-so-smart software with hardware that would break all the time, and that's not a good product," Thrun says. "It's only recently that both computers have become smart enough and that robot hardware has become reliable enough that the very first products start to emerge.”

Perhaps the biggest leap in hardware has been sensor technology. To build a robot you don’t have to babysit, you need it to sense its environment, and to sense its environment it needs a range of sensors. Not just with cameras, but with lasers that build a 3-D map of the robot’s surroundings. These kinds of components have gotten both far more powerful and far cheaper.

“I kind of talk about this finally being the golden age of robotics, and that means that for the first time in the last 12 months or so you see robots really becoming prolific,” says Ben Wolff, CEO of Sarcos Robotics, which makes the most bonkers robot arms you’ve ever seen. “And I think it's because we're finally at that crossover point, where the cost has come down of components while the capability of the components has increased sufficiently.”
 

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yeah ofcourse, no one at the steering wheel here... what can you expect, nothing but harm.. but then sometimes humans do some stupid shit, very noticable when your on the motorcycle and everybody is pulling out if front of you :)))
 
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