BC Sport Bikes Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,114 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How often do you clean your air filter? Did it make any noticeable improvements in throttle response?? I dunno but I think my bike is starting to get a bit choppy in the lower revs.... though I didn't start to notice it until the other day. I normally run chevron 94, but tried esso 92 this past week, I wonder if my bike dislikes esso gas or something.....

hmmm.... maybe my fuel injectors are getting dirty???

btw, I have yet to clean the air filter since last summer.... and since I ride in the rain and crap, I think it's due time I clean that thing....
 

·
Resident Banana
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
I just recently changed mine over the off season. It seems to have more pull but i haven't ridden it in about 2 months before I had it changed.

Your choppiness may be due to the fuel. I only use Chevron 94 and have used Shell in the past. I found it a little off on the Shell stuff....I can't explain it, just off. I now use Chevron exclusively and if its not around, I'll put $5 in until I do find one.

Run a tank of the Chevron 94 and see if it works better, but you've probably doing that already....:D .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
What kind of an Air Filter?

You put a lot of KM's on your bike, it may be time to change it if it's paper. I'm assuming though since you mentioned cleaning it's a reusuable filter?

I've got a K&N (I use K&N's in all my vehicles..) and clean it every time I do my plugs (10,000Kms). K&N's work best slightly dirty so don't overclean.

Jim.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,114 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It's the stock OEM filter.

It could be the gas, I have been using Chevron 94 since well last summer. Then on the ride last sunday, I needed to fill up and used Esso 92.... I just put Chevron 94 in last night, so hopefully it was just the gas.... I'm gonna pull out the filter sometime this weekend and give it a check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
How much mileage do you have on the bike.. I'm thinking it's also time to change the filter. Grab a K&N, you'll notice the bike will pull through the revs slightly faster with more air.

Also, as it was explained to me once (I can't confirm this.. maybe someone else can). Around here all the gas comes from two main refineries and is pretty much the same with the exception of the additives (which apparently are a joke?).

If your bike is setup for 89 or 91 octane, 94 won't help you. The higher the octane the slower the gas burns, If you use a lower octane and notice any pinging (premature detonation) then you'll need to go to a higher octane, otherwise the lower octane will actually run better (faster, proper burn).

For gas, I just make it a rule of thumb to goto a newer station, preferably one of the big 4 (Shell, Petro Can, Esso, Chevron). I stay away from older stations because there could be crap and sediment in their tanks. Other than that I don't have a preference on Gas (except that I do have to run 92).

Hope that made sence? Hopefully someone can confirm the whole refinery thing..

Jim.
 

·
I'm back
Joined
·
1,947 Posts
I always thought Octane level's were related to oxygen content in the gasoline but I was way off when I did some searching.

The first rule of thumb is that higher octane gasoline is not necessarily better for your vehicle.

WHAT IS OCTANE RATING?

Octane, by definition, is the resistance to burn or detonation. The higher the rating, the slower the burn when ignited during the compression burn cycle of the piston. The higher octane allows for better control of burning for high compression engines. So we want to match the correct octane rating of the gasoline to the engine design to ensure complete burning of the gasoline by the engine for maximum fuel economy and clean emissions.

I THOUGHT GASOLINE WITH HIGHER OCTANE REDUCED ENGINE KNOCK?

It did in older engines using carburetors to regulate air/gas mix They cannot as accurately regulate the air/fuel mix going into the engine as a computerized fuel injector. Carburetors need adjustment, as a part of regular maintenance, to keep the air/fuel mix as accurate as possible. So many times, these adjustments were not made regularly causing too much fuel to be mixed with the air. When this happened the gasoline would not burn completely soaking into carbon deposits. This would cause a premature ignition of the gasoline due to the intense heat in the engine cylinder creating "engine knock." When this happened, people would change to the higher octane/slower burning gasoline to resist the premature burn, thus minimizing the knocking problem. And it worked. Good solution.

However, since the middle to late 80’s, engines are designed to use fuel injectors with computers to accurately control the air/fuel mix under all types of temperature and environment concerns. However the accuracy of the fuel injectors and computers is based on using the recommended gasoline for that engine.

Most cars are designed to burn regular unleaded fuels with an octane rating of 87. If the vehicle needs a higher octane rating of 89-93, there is documentation in the owner’s manual, as well as possibly under the fuel gauge and by the fuel fill hole. Usually you will see this rating for high performance engines only.

WHAT IF I PREFER TO USE GASOLINE WITH HIGHER OCTANE RATINGS?

You can, but there are no real benefits, other than the gasoline manufacturers making more money off of you. When you use a fuel with a higher octane rating than your vehicle requires, you can send this unburned fuel into the emissions system. It can also collect in the catalytic converter. When you over stress any system, it can malfunction or not do what it was designed to do properly. In the early 90's, an early warning symptom was a rotten egg smell from the tailpipe. Easy fix, go back to using regular 87 octane gasoline. The rude odor usually disappears after several tanks of gasoline.

DOESN'T HIGHER OCTANE GASOLINE HAVE MORE CLEANING ADDITIVES THAT ARE GOOD FOR MY ENGINE?

No. Government regulations require that all gasoline contain basically the same amount of additives to clean the injectors and valves. The only differences are the type to help create the different octane ratings. All gasoline burns at the same rate, it is the additives that create the different octane ratings for the different types of engines.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,114 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Big Jim said:
What kind of an Air Filter?

You put a lot of KM's on your bike, it may be time to change it if it's paper. I'm assuming though since you mentioned cleaning it's a reusuable filter?

I've got a K&N (I use K&N's in all my vehicles..) and clean it every time I do my plugs (10,000Kms). K&N's work best slightly dirty so don't overclean.

Jim.
I have 7000km on my bike. But since I ride in all weather, I think i'll need to clean the filter more often....

I'm gonna have to head out to school today, so i'll know whether or not this 94 chevron makes the response actually smoother than the 92 esso that I just finished using up....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,766 Posts
Quasi you know your shit! I ran my 99 r1 on 87 octane while everyone I knew dumped gallons of 92-94 in theirs,they all asked me why I didn't burn the good stuff?
Well guy's if you read your manual on the R1 it says (THIS MOTOR WAS DEVELOPED ON 86 OCTANE) We can't evin get 86 here,lowest is 87.But they just keep dumping it in and smiling. That motor is still running strong down in Idaho somewhere,and buddy is running the cheep stuff still ,and lovin the thing.
Do yourself a favour............read the manual..............if you feel better putting 92-94 in it,it will only benifit you ! Dont waste your money if it's not nessisairy?
My old gsxr had a warning against burning gas made with wheat,I thnk that's what it was????? you know ,the stuff that Husky and .....................cant rember who the other one was?
anyways they gave it a nice name ,but it don't work well on bikes !
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top