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Discussion Starter #1
This may have been on here before but if not it is a interesting read.It is in regards to how you break in a new bike. I thought "No way at first but who knows!"

Any mechanics seen this before? Anyone tried it? It makes some sense but what do I know?!

I have 4 yrs of warranty then I will get a new one so maybe there is no risk?

What do you guys think?



http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 
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it's not about revving the shit out of it like a moron. it's about loading the engine up gradually and engine braking also. what the fuck do i care- go out tonite and spin that fucker upto 16,200 and see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I fully understand it is not about just revving it up, of course it has to be under load. I was only asking if anyone was familiar with this website's concept or had tried something similar.

thanks anyway, anyone else?
 

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I do not endorse Motoman’s extreme methods. New engines are built so well that all you need do if vary the revs lots and vary the loads lots for the first while and all will be fine. Follow the manual’s advice for the break-in & change the oil & filter a lot during break-in.
 

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Chumly said:
I do not endorse Motoman’s extreme methods. New engines are built so well that all you need do if vary the revs lots and vary the loads lots for the first while and all will be fine. Follow the manual’s advice for the break-in & change the oil & filter a lot during break-in.

hey are you a mechanic too...? i thought you were just pretending to be Rossi on the other thread?

i have broken in several engines like this... and my only engine that ever burned excessive oil and blew smoke was the one i broke in using the "recommended break in"

do it slowly...ie smooth throttle inputs...and let her wind back down.... do it over and over untill with progressively higher RPM until redline... change the oil... she is done. you can do this in one day.
 

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Thanks for the positive feedback...either way! I was told this method works well and was endorsed by quite a few local racers.
 

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SILVER_6R said:
hey are you a mechanic too...? i thought you were just pretending to be Rossi on the other thread?
:roflmao :roflmao
 
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Still the best way to break in an engine is on a water dyno. It is the way we break in large diesel engines. And I have Done 2 bikes like this over the years and they lasted a long time with no problems.
 

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Nothing wrong whatsoever with Moto or water dyno routes. Gets the break in over and makes a bike with power. Soft touch the thing and it'll always be soft. On every engine I've ever touched this is how I got 'er going. None has ever broken from this and all have been strong as hell. Just remember to use your brain, apply a systematic approach and make sure the thing is warm before you start.

CR
 

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Chumly said:
I do not endorse Motoman’s extreme methods. New engines are built so well that all you need do if vary the revs lots and vary the loads lots for the first while and all will be fine. Follow the manual’s advice for the break-in & change the oil & filter a lot during break-in.
And you base that on personal experience, or someone else's opinion you've heard along the way?

The question has some real meaning to me at this point, I'm breaking in a new motor this week (once the unseasonable cold stops). I've got a half dozen friends with racing and mechanical experience that go through several engines a year between them, and their experience has shown that this method, done properly, leads to better ring sealing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Crotchety and Commuter, nice to hear. I am going to break in my new R6 in the beginning of April.
 

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Extremely popular and contentious topic. Try a search on "breakin" and spend the night reading the results. It's all been said often before.
 

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Commuter Boy said:
And you base that on personal experience, or someone else's opinion you've heard along the way?

The question has some real meaning to me at this point, I'm breaking in a new motor this week (once the unseasonable cold stops). I've got a half dozen friends with racing and mechanical experience that go through several engines a year between them, and their experience has shown that this method, done properly, leads to better ring sealing.
I have never broken down a series of engines with differing break-in procedures. I have read about the results of such. I also have a reasonably good grounding in mechanics, engineering and physics.

Some of the claims that Motoman makes are rather dubious. I have much respect for a fellow named ShipFixer at http://www.vfrdiscussion.com/. I’ll quote him for your edification as he puts it better than me.
Your internal "whirly bits" are separated by a film of oil... there is no appreciable wear.
ShipFixer said:
Wear occurs throughout the life of your engine...no oil is frictionless, nor are your engine parts enjoying full hydrodynamic lubrication at all times - particularly your rings. Only one fluid known to man is frictionless, and only within a few degrees of absolute zero

We've been over this...Motoman's method is not sound engineering or science, and the underlying theories are too incorrect to support it. He doesn't even understand how piston rings really work or even how they're designed to operate, and that's pretty easily obtained from journals, textbooks, or tech manuals. Modern plateau honing is designed such that your engine will break in properly regardless of much that you do...this is why cars and bikes don't even come with strict RPM limitations for break in anymore.

The only real risk you can incur during break-in is doing something silly like running the hell out of it and ruining the honing or deforming a bearing...changing the oil at fifty miles won't fix what you've screwed up, it'll just remove the immediate evidence. All the mechanical engineers on the board concur.
I watched Honda build a bike in 12 minutes then run it to red line checking power...
ShipFixer said:
Back then we didn't understand how things worked. Its kind of like saying the F-15 worked out okay according to fracture mechanics despite the fact that it wasn't designed to any fracture mechanics criteria, because we didn't know enough about the subject yet...methods like Motoman's are lucky or simply don't create enough problems to be noticed all the time rather than actually being beneficial.

Practices like these used to be common because we didn't know any better and people came up with whatever seemed right. There were still things about aluminum and steel we really didn't get that's pretty common knowledge nowadays. Tribology (study of wear) and fracture mechanics are much more mature fields now and there's a wealth of knowledge about the liner/ring interface that discredits all of the old "trial and error" generated knowledge such as redline break-ins.

No need to reinvent the wheel, these kinds of things really are well understood by the people who design them. Its simply not good enough to say that someone has done it and "hasn't had any problems," that only signifies luck.
Wear does occur throughout the life of an engine but I was addressing the false notion
that "internal whirly bits wear in" like as in rod and crankshaft bearings...
ShipFixer said:
Well, they do wear in, just not as much as they used to. Normal wear in journal bearings is pretty much the same as in the liner and ring. There's a short period of exponentially decreasing wear, followed by a lifetime of roughly linear wear at a very slow rate. In engine journal bearings depending on what and where the part is you'll also tend to wear in an eccentric wear pattern...partly from start up wear, and partly from where the minimum film thickness is during running. You also have dynamic events like acceleration or deceleration, or shocks that may cause some contact wear. Lubricant viscocity directly controls how much wear goes on and ultimately how long the engine will last between overhauls.

I guess the "most correct" way to put it is that modern bearing materials and manufacturing make the wear-in of bearings (or anything) less of an event than it used to be. Nowadays its not a big deal for cars to go past 200K miles and not lose compression or anything. I don't know what the journals in VFR's are made of, but the babbitt in our ship engines was soft enough that you could push into it a little with your finger (and then get yelled at by the tech rep for touching it)...not much work to break them in! It also replaced previous tri-layer bearing material that was really craptacular and liked to give up and delaminate after only 1000-1500 hours(!), but I don't know a whole lot about those alloys.
 

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Chumly said:
Ride the dead horse!
You dissin' me? Are YOU dissin' ME? Are you DISSIN' me? :D:laughing :D
 

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You wanna fuck with me? Okay. You wannna play rough? Okay. Say hello to my little friend.

<Al Pacino Playing Tony Montana in Scarface>
 

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cosworth said:
2 pages of bandwidth I'll never get back.
Hey, work with us poochie! We're almost up to the day time soaps standard for acting now. A little more and we'll only be bad instead of terrible.....

.... oh, the breakin stuff? I'll deal with that later after I get into character....
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I did a better search, a page ago and yeah, this topic has been rode hard! Sorry guys, if I had only done a better search.

Oh well ,thanks a bunch anyway.
 
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