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Discussion Starter #1
I was playing around wit ht eidea of possibly getting a dirt bike down the road. A lot of people talk about it and love it, but then I realized i know fuck all about it.

So that brings me to my question. What are some set of steps that I should follow to get into it slowly? Is there such thing, or just get a bike find a dirt road and go.

What are some of the good beginner bikes? I would like to get dedicated dirt bike I think. What are some good ones to start with, and which ones should I stay away from? I saw a big difference in bike prices. Some go for $1K, some for $4K+. Are more expensive ones that much better?

Would you reccomend any courses 1st, or just go out and ride? I know Bill at 5th gear has his dirt riding outings, so maybe that? I would like to one day do something like American Supercamp or Texas Tornado boot camp. Possibly do that at the beginning?

Like I said, lots of questions and some help and guidance would be good
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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Go out with Bill, He will teach you the basics and how to be safe, then show you some nice areas to go ride. From there you can assess your skills and then shop for a bike that works for you. Plan B is when Popkum opens you can go rent a bike, they have everything from little 125;s to full out MX bikes and even have trials bikes and a great teacher. Keep in mind the bike show is around the corner and there will be heaps of people and clubs to help you out...tonite is the last indoor MX and will for sure get you excited.
 

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Get a bike and go, wear some protection...
Any dirtbike from mid nineties and up will be a fairly decent machine provided it's not clapped out (and you don't mind twisting wrenches)... (Unless you weigh 125 lbs, don't buy a 125cc)
Mr Sushi is right, go with someone to learn some basics/places to go... Have fun!
 

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Maybe put some thought into dual sport, more of a cross over from street riding. Keep the bike small, something like a KTM 350 EXC F, street legal enough to ride on the street but small enough to have fun on the FSR's and into single track. Keep in mind that bike is the bike of choice and near impossible to find 2012 and newer for sale in BC.

There are endless kilometers of trails to explore throughout BC, also Triangle Beach in Richmond is somewhere close enough to try out a bike. Spent lots of time there teaching my kids how to ride, now they go out and crush it at McNutt. Also try joining DSBC and get some advise and hook up with fellow newbie riders.

One more thing if a fellow dirt biker offers to tour you through McNutt walk away, he is not your friend ;-)

Hope you move forward with learning to ride in the dirt, the adventures are endless. There is a small group of us heading down on the 27th for 3 weeks to explore the back trails of the Baja. Bikes and margaritas what more could a guy ask for ;-)

Cheers,
LAH
 

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Iv also been considering getting a dirt bike to dick around on and hopefully learn some wrenching skills too

should I get a 250 4 stroke or a 2 stroke? :devillook

Iv read on forums that if I buy a used 250f expect to put atleast 1000 into for work
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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Iv also been considering getting a dirt bike to dick around on and hopefully learn some wrenching skills too

should I get a 250 4 stroke or a 2 stroke? :devillook

Iv read on forums that if I buy a used 250f expect to put atleast 1000 into for work
Thats correct to a point. I went back to a 2 stroke 250 after owning all the 4 strokes. They work so much better in tight trails.The 250 4 strokes do need and go through lots of parts and do blow up if not maintained. the 450's seem to last lots longer since most riders cant ride a 450 full out and rarely are run full throttle anywhere but down a straight road. Even though on paper a 250 2t and 4t are the same weight the 2t "feel" 20 pounds lighter since most of the weight is carried lower. If you watch the off road scene closely you will notice a shift in what most top riders are now back on. a few years ago it was 98% 4 strokes, now its about 60% 4 strokes. Off road riders are finding out the costs of maintenance on 4 strokes and the power to weight can not be beat.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wouldn't a 2 stroke be harder to learn on, and harder for new dirt rider in general. 2 storeks have very small power band, so to get them going you would need to be in that band all the time. If you are not in the power band, you arent really going anywhere, and bike would be sluggish and non responsive. Maybe I am completely off, but that is kinda my thinking. Please do correct me if I am completely off the mark here.
 

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I've heard from my friends that modern 2 stroke enduro bikes are tuned differently, to give you more low end torque, not like motocross 2 strokes where it's all about top end. I myself currently riding yz450f 2008 it's a lot of fun on logging roads, more challenging on single trials but still plenty of fun, after some mods. Eventually thinking of switching to 2t like Ktm or husky. I have strictly offroad bike, as It's more convenient to just load it on back of your SUV, change clothes, turn heated seats on and drive home, instead of riding bike back. We can go one day to triangle Road if you want to try it out one day Marko (went there with Max last summer) .
 

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The enduro bikes vs motocross bikes have always had a softer power delivery and more compliant suspension damping, due to their intended purpose.

The street legal/dual purpose bikes are compromised by suspension, and weight, except for some Euro manufacturers...

The engine displacement argument is basically the same as street bikes, smaller displacement = less bottom end torque and more revs to make power, large displacement = more bottom end torque and less revs required to make power. The smaller engine works harder/wears faster in relation to a bigger one.

Arguably, 2 stroke makes more power than 4 stroke. It certainly is a more simple engine, has a lower centre of weight and costs less to service.
The 2 stroke "powerband" issue relates directly to the displacement and tune of the engine. A dirtbike engine requires a relatively wide powerband vs streetbike. It's difficult to get a flat/wide powerband and high horsepower out of a small displacement engine... they require rpm for hp.
500cc 2 stroke, no problem, at either end of the rpm range for power(0-6000), many complained of too much to be useable (they don't make them anymore). Once 250's started making 40hp there was no need for them.

A bike you can't touch the ground on, is harder to learn on for a newbie.

It's more about suspension and skills on a dirtbike. Anybody that can ride a 50hp motocross bike, or a 40hp enduro bike while it's making all it's hp, around an appropriate track ... the factories are looking for you!
 

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Wouldn't a 2 stroke be harder to learn on, and harder for new dirt rider in general. 2 storeks have very small power band, so to get them going you would need to be in that band all the time. If you are not in the power band, you arent really going anywhere, and bike would be sluggish and non responsive. Maybe I am completely off, but that is kinda my thinking. Please do correct me if I am completely off the mark here.
MX 2T is kinda like what you describe. There arent a lot of bottom end power but when the power hits, you better hang on. They are designed this way for the purpose of track riding. However, 2T built for enduro (ie. KTM/Berg 200 XCW, 250 XC/XCW, 300 XC/XCW) have a very smooth power delivery with lots of bottom end power which is perfect for the trails around here.
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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Wouldn't a 2 stroke be harder to learn on, and harder for new dirt rider in general. 2 storeks have very small power band, so to get them going you would need to be in that band all the time. If you are not in the power band, you arent really going anywhere, and bike would be sluggish and non responsive. Maybe I am completely off, but that is kinda my thinking. Please do correct me if I am completely off the mark here.
The old 2 strokes are like you remember. The new motors make unbelievable electric type power, they pull from idle then make as much power as a 450. The new 2 strokes have variable port timing, some fuel and oil injected, and they can be tuned with different ignition maps. I went from a 450 and 250 4t back to a 250 for off road single track. Way more fun!!! Way more easier!!! Unless you have a chance to try a new bike there is no way to describe how each type of motor works. Keep in mind they allowed twice the displacement to compete with a 250 just to match the power. And these days the technologies in 2 stroke engines are at the peak of development, 4 strokes are still evolving...
 

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And these days the technologies in 2 stroke engines are at the peak of development, 4 strokes are still evolving...
i would have guessed the opposite after Honda and the EPA killed 2 stroke development in the 90's... 4 strokes have had heavy development and must be at the top of their affordability and technology range.

If they ever figure out direct injection to reduce the emissions, 2 strokes win, hands down...

Suspension moves along independently.
 

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2 strokes have very smooth power delivery if you keep it in the power band.

That's the real trick; if you keep letting it drop off the pipe and then getting it back on you get the big kick in the seat of the pants.

That's why they make potent track weapons because you know what's coming next. You're always in the right gear and on the gas.

In the woods when you're trail riding; and learning to ride on dirt also keeping the bike on pipe is the trickier part.
 

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Haha.... power every revolution over a 1000 rpm spread :)

The new power valved, ignition mapped 2 strokes have a much more gentle power delivery.
 

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2 strokes have very smooth power delivery if you keep it in the power band.

That's the real trick; if you keep letting it drop off the pipe and then getting it back on you get the big kick in the seat of the pants.

That's why they make potent track weapons because you know what's coming next. You're always in the right gear and on the gas.

In the woods when you're trail riding; and learning to ride on dirt also keeping the bike on pipe is the trickier part.
You must never have ridden a modern euro two stroke. They make power from one engine revolution, like a fucking tractor. Easier to ride than a four stroke, kicks easier, lighter, and the weight is lower. Maintenance is also easier. I have both.

Key determinant is your height. For trail riding, which is what you likely will do, a bike that is too high will not be fun. You will suck, as will the experience. Also, strongly disagree with the dual sport argument. They suck as well for anything technical. I mean, a modern 350 four stroke is awesome, but that is 10 K or close to it. An 08 or better KTM 200 2 smoke is a great fucking bike. An e start one is even better.
 

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It really is pretty unbelievable actually. I recommend trying one. Simply unbelievable if you remember how old style two strokes rode.
 
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