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I cant offer much other than a - don't do what Donny don't does - story.
-Don't get a 450 just because they are the same price as 250s on craigs.
-the crf 450x is not a "trail" bike just because it has a headlight and a slightly heavier flywheel than the 450f full ass motox model. it's a big, tall, powerful bastard that will attempt to spit you off and land on you at every opportunity. Also, it will probably have the suspension set up for it's aggressive, riding since he was 3 years old, former owner.
-electric start is awesome for a newbie rider
-if you go down it, you have to go back up it.
-other riders r dicks and will direct you to gnarly terrain (see skiing with asshole buddies).
-low speed tip overs are common, a learning process, and a bit of a laugh if you are geared up properly,
-higher speed wipe outs suck. E=1/2mv^2.
-if something is sketchy and you don't like it, and you don't have to do it to get home, then just fuck it and come back when u got more skillz. ride your own ride applies just as on the road.
-proper gear is your best buddy.
-riding with a friend is way more fun and less dangerballs.
-riding with broken human parts sucks.
 

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Got Hammer?
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n I think that it's a balance between your riding personality, budget, and size. Inseam is really the starting point. I see nothing where you say height/weight. After that is experience/attitude.
You have a day job and it's important to make sure it's a way to have fun with your friends rather than be the next youtube sensation destroying your body forever.

budget and size/experience aside all that I can really recommend is anything well maintained and suitibly sized/maintained for you.
 

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Offroad riding is awesome, but it's a one way ticket to broken bones if not taken seriously.
 

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I got back into dirt riding this year (still kept the ZRX though), and got a good deal on a Husky TR 650. After some modifications to make it a little more dirt worthy, the bike is a blast! For me, I wanted a bike I could comfortably ride on the pavement to get to off road areas. I don't plan on doing any single track gnarly stuff, or rock jumping, just fire roads, forestry service roads, etc. I had a Suzuki 250 moto-cross bike years ago, but I had forgotten how physical off road riding can be. Be prepared, and get good gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Thanks everyone for replies and suggestions.

Saw few questions, so here are the answers. I am 5'10 and about 160lbs. Riding wise so far did street riding for 3 seasons (almost 20K so not that much) and some track time.

Like mentioned before, I am leaning towards dirt only as I could just load it up in the van and go. This way I dont have to worry about insurance if nothing else.

In regards to gear, I saw that people wear a bunch of different things. I am guessing leathers are too much? I havent seen many ride with street leathers dirt. Maybe I just wasnt looking hard enough.
 

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Umm yea, dont think i've ever seen leather enduro/mx gear. Here are the basic equipment that you would need:
- Dirt helmet
- Goggles
- MX or mountain bike gloves (they're very similar or identical in many cases)
- MX boots (please do not ride in hiking boots)
- Elbow guard
- Knee/shin guard
- Chest protector (recommended)
- MX pants (recommended)
- MX jersey (optional)

Other than throttle and clutching, your street riding experience doesnt really mean much as they are 2 different sports.
 

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Well, you already know how to operate a motorcycle, 160 lbs will give you a nice power to weight ratio, at 5' 10" you should be able to touch the ground (mostly) and have good leverage over the bike.

If you've ridden on the street, you should know what target fixation is (I hope), some track time will give you an idea of your limits.

If you're a skier, mnt biker or something you'll have idea of anticipating the terrain coming up, and of sliding. A real big difference between street bikes and dirt riding is the variable traction and terrain.

Street leathers are probably going to be way too hot and restrictive, dirt biking is alot more physical than street riding, and they will get destroyed pretty quickly... old school mx pants used to be leather, now they're cordura/nylon with venting.

You will need 3rd party liability insurance to ride offroad these days. (inexpensive)

Boots, shin/knee guards count alot (that's the first thing to hit the ground), and take a look at the footpegs, bouncing your shin off those things really hurts! There is alot of shit flying around at ground level and most obstacles are on the ground.

You want a helmet with a visor and eye protection, gloves... Beyond that, think of running down a trail as fast as you can and diving into the bush, protect yourself if you need to go to work next week or just don't like bleeding :)

blah blah blah blah... It's the best game ever (besides sex:) ) IMO
 

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Got Hammer?
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Thanks everyone for replies and suggestions.

Saw few questions, so here are the answers. I am 5'10 and about 160lbs. Riding wise so far did street riding for 3 seasons (almost 20K so not that much) and some track time.

Like mentioned before, I am leaning towards dirt only as I could just load it up in the van and go. This way I dont have to worry about insurance if nothing else.

In regards to gear, I saw that people wear a bunch of different things. I am guessing leathers are too much? I havent seen many ride with street leathers dirt. Maybe I just wasnt looking hard enough.
The type of leathers that you'd use for track/street riding will all of the protection that you need but it'll be really hot, it sucks to get them muddy, and you'll look stupid. Experience and size are probably enough that you could expect to live the very important first 100 feet on most bikes. I would tend to look at smaller options given your weight/experience and say that some of the heavy or big bore bikes won't be great to start with. One thing that you didn't say was budget. A couple thousand can get you riding with used or well shopped gear and a well shopped bike. I kind of like a WR250X/KTM200/drz400 or something along those lines but you're looking at closer to 5k to be riding. The gear lists above are pretty accurate for what you want to wear. You might luck out and find a deal that's a getting out of sport sale with everything in the right size but it isn't hard to add 500-1000 for all of the gear..
 

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+1
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+1 for popkum. Full day rental with full gear. half a day of training, half a day of exploration.

+2 for bill to have some time out under real conditions.
 

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Yeah, the new euro 2Ts are that good these days. I was pretty skeptical with the whole rekluse thing because i dont really mind clutching but having ridden one for the entire summer, i'm a believer now. One less thing to worry about when picking your lines through the woods. In addition, the new 2Ts are quiet with sound less than 88db which is mandatory for most xc races and riding areas these days
 

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+1 for popkum. Full day rental with full gear. half a day of training, half a day of exploration.

+2 for bill to have some time out under real conditions.
Popkum is where you will break the bones. Remember Rossi's dad: "the motorcross is not the way to ride the motorcycle"

That said I want to do it. If done, I am told it is not if you will hurt yourself, but when. Riding technical trails does not feel that risky. Bruising, often, yes, but not bonecrushing.
 

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From N00bie to Wannabe
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OP; It's your (almost?) first dirt ride? Go try it out at Popkum with their bikes & gear. You are not going to be clearing singles let alone doubles or triples! You ain't likely to break bones on your first few rides at Popkum than anywhere else and if you do: you're not alone, 5 kms into the bush!
It will give you the opportunity to try a couple of different bikes (150, 250) and see what you feel good on. You will find a 250 to be a handfull at first that will sit you on your ass in a blink! At least at popkum it's probably dirt you faceplant on and not a trail tree or rock! It will get you your sea legs on a dirt bike before taking on unknown trails & obstacles.
Then: go buy a bike with a little seat time behind you and a better idea of what you'll like for a year or two and head up to Nickelmine (www.fvdra.com). Lots of easy trails as well as Double Diamond and everything in between. Great group too and you will almost always find similarly skilled riders to trail ride with that know which trails to ride or avoid.
 

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MX and enduro are 2 very different things. First experience can make a difference whether you'll likely stay with it or stay away from it. I rode the MX track when I first bought a dirt bike and while it is fun, personally I feel it is a little too risky for me.

I would be more than happy to give you a tour in squamish. There are some really good beginner friendly trails in squamish.
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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Bike show is coming up.....visit all the dirt bike booths...find an old guy named Ted in one of the booths...he is working in a few...start at the Dualsport booth...He can answer any questions....At the trials club we have demo days and you can try a trials bike too...
 

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Both motocross and trail riding can break bones, but MX by far has way more serious injuries. I've broken many bones on offroad bikes... and I gave up Motocross this year purely for that reason. At some point you get tired of broken collarbones, wrists and so forth.
 

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From N00bie to Wannabe
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You guys have landed on your head too many times!
OP wants to "try" dirt biking and doesn't have a bike. He would hardly be riding "MX" on his first day fer fuks sake! He needs a relatively obstacle free patch of dirt like the mini track at Popkum that also has a variety of hardware to try out and first aid is close at hand should he manage to launch and bend himself too much! Far better than in the boonies not having a fukin clue on a bike that may be too much. No; it's not how most if not all of us started out but that's why it's a great opportunity!
I hate Popkum. Not because of the facility but because of the startup politics. They will never get a nickel out of me but that won't stop me from agreeing that it is a fantastic concept for a new dirt rider to let out the clutch for the first time and see what it feels like to have the bike move around under you a bit.
Once he knows the bike he wants (or better said: the power); it's off to the trails like Nickelmine or Squamish!
And no matter what; take up Sushi's offer too!

But he's not MX'ing ON HIS FIRST FUKIN RIDE! He's riding awkwardly on a dirt surface without trees or rocks, finding a bike size that fits! He'll be exhausted in 15 minutes!
 
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