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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed yesterday that the bike is hard to push in neutreal... today in the morning before work I looked at the rear brakes, and somethign looked funny. So I looked at the brakepads.. the one on the inside(between the disk and the wheel) is at a funny angle..eg: not parallel to the disk :(. I'm going to take em out today and see what's up. Any suggestions on what i should/shouldn't do? What could this be?


Thanks

-D


(i drove my car to work on a beautiful day like this :()
 
D

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the pin that holds them in the caliper could have broken off or slid out and let them fall a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
doug said:
the pin that holds them in the caliper could have broken off or slid out and let them fall a bit.
i wish that was so .. :)
that could be an easy fix.

will this day never end, i wanna go home and fix it.
gah.
 

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Start with a good overall look and check for things that are loose or can be slid out of place. Grab the caliper and try to twist it around to an angle that the brake pads are obviously moving to.

Other than that start taking the caliper off and check the pads for jamming in the body. Some of them have just enough paint or stamping flash to bind. They should be loose enough to rattle just slightly on the pins.
 

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Back to the OG
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What also may be the case:
IF there is a washer that is supposed to be positioned either between the wheel/caliper or caliper/swingarm, and was put on the incorrect side last time the wheel was removed/replaced, it will put the caliper at an incorrect angle, and in turn wear the pads at an angle - this happened on mine and it took some time before the pad wore enough that the caliper body was contacting the rotor. Regardless, you want to remove everything and rebuild the caliper. It's a relatively simple procedure that only involves cleaning everything, and installing new seals... also pads.
If the washer possibility is not the case, the piston(s) may simply be seized due to dirt buildup/ ozidation. again, to remedy this, you need to either try cleaning the hell out of it, or rebuild it.
The seals for mine were under 30 bucks, and it took a couple hours to go through the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
thanks for your advice..
im gonna check it out later tonight.

problem is the pad is at a fairly large angle to the rotor..
it scares me :rolleyes
 

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Jackie Chan's stuntdouble
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Miteorite said:


Lovely..
why's that?
Any idea on the $$?
Calipers are simple and usually quite reliable devices. There is something seriously wrong with yours.

As Lugan mentioned, a rebuild kit is not that expensive. If you do need to replace it, you could probably get a used caliper for not too much money.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
well.. it's official. fucked up by circumstances.
the inside pad is ground up almsot completely. The outside pad is slightly used. The rotor is gone. Now I gotta figure out what went wrong and bring my bike to a shop to be fixed. Can anyone suggest where i can get me a new cheap rotor/pads (and install all that too)..
Thanks..

And this is what it looked like before i took out the pads:



The inside pad was sitting ON TOP of the rotor..
fucketh..
 

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Ouch. Something caused your system to not bleed the fluid back into the reservoir. In effect it looks like it pumped up in the activated direction only and didn't vent back when pressure was realeased.

You'r whole rear brake system obviously needs to be rebuilt to find the cause. Along with your new rotor of course. And watch that you don't adjust the rear brake pedal so that the master cylinder piston does not retract far enough to open the little hole to the reservoir. This can be tested with the caliper off the swingarm. putting on the brakes should make the pistons come out but when the lever is returned to rest you should be able to push the pistons back into the caliper. If you can't then something is blocking that little hole. It may be grit or it may be that the master cylinder piston isn't moving back far enough.

Damn that sucks.
 

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Jackie Chan's stuntdouble
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It may just be the caliper, but it is possible you have more than one problem. Do like BMatthews says and rebuild the system.

On the plus side, your fuel consumption should improve... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
yeah it does suck :(

Someone suggested that the brake pad was faulty (in addition to other problem) and it simply disintergrated. I'm going to inquire at carter what can be done about this.

GOnna call up a buncha shops tomorrow and see how much it's going to cost...

Need to replace my front tire anyway..

-D
 
D

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how about a pic of the rotor?

so far all i see is a piston siezed in the open position. it may not be as bad as it seems. if you can get a clamp in there and push it back you can salvage it.

if the rotor doesn't have too much damage you may be able to have it turned and reuse it.

don't think the worst of this. you'd be surprised at what can actually be done.
 

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I agree with supermotard (just kidding). But seriously, all it looks like is a seized piston. The master cylinder pushes the fluid out, but upon release, it is the vibration/fine scale warpage of the rotor that causes the pads& pistons to retract. If there is a slight amount of contamination/dirt/etc, the piston may seize as yours has. If you have limited mechanical abilities, you can rebuild it - limited. 1/ take it off the bike, 2/ go to your local tire shop, and ask them nicely to spend all of 5 seconds to use their air supply to blow the pistons out - put a small piece of wood between the pistons so they don't smack each other. 3/ take it home and take it all apart, clean the pistons and caliper body with paint thinner, varsol, gasoline, whatever. 4/slide the new oil seals on if you bought some, and you've learned to rebuild your caliper, and saved a wad of cash.
 
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that sounds good, all but the cleaning method. use brake cleaner only. use of varsol and the like will leave contaminants in the calipers because they are oil based and don't evaporate 100%. brake cleaner will eat anything it comes in contact with, other than brakes, so be careful where you spray it. if you have the caliper off you are ok, but if its still on the bike you will need to cover the rim and probably the swing arm too.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
thanks for the info guys.
i'll attempt to do that myself tomorrow :)


can i use any air supply to blow the pistons out?


as for the disk, is majorly uneven and getting thin.
I was told by the shop that it has to be replaced end of the seaon (mid next season perhaps) so might as well do that now.

where would i get new oil seals??

btw do the brakepads look like they were faulty to begin with? Or can it be blamed on my shoddy installation work?

Thanks..

-d
 
D

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Miteorite said:
thanks for the info guys.
i'll attempt to do that myself tomorrow :)


can i use any air supply to blow the pistons out?


as for the disk, is majorly uneven and getting thin.
I was told by the shop that it has to be replaced end of the seaon (mid next season perhaps) so might as well do that now.

where would i get new oil seals??

btw do the brakepads look like they were faulty to begin with? Or can it be blamed on my shoddy installation work?

Thanks..

-d
hit up ben at north shore suzuki for parts. should have most if not everything in stock.
 
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