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Fast Pack Slow Guy
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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for info or first hand accounts of people who've immigrated to the States or have lived for extended time in the U.S. with a foreign passport.

My wife and I are Canadian and are planning to buy property in Las Vegas and live for a portion of the year or perhaps full time there.

We wouldn't be concerned with getting work permits right away as we run a Canadian registered company and are self sustaining, although not entirely necessary I wouldn't mind getting a work permit to work at a tattoo shop legally while I was there.

Eventually, we'd be looking at getting some sort of immigrant status so we can live legally full time in the States.

Any suggestions?
 
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hit the us consulate. they have all the us immigration info you need.

you can live in the states, as long as you are not working, for several months at a time. just have to prove you have savings, and a residence to go back to after.

it is also possible to get work on a temp visa. h1 i think it is. if you are opening a shop, you stand a far better chance of getting permanent resident status.
 

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Fast Pack Slow Guy
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Discussion Starter #5
PressurePoint said:
One question? Why?
You can buy a 3 bedroom, two level brand new house in a decent neigbouhood in Vegas for about $200,000.

And it doesn't freakin' rain 8 months of the year = ride motorcycle all year round.

And yes, we more financial opportunity for a person in my field. Or any field for that matter.
 
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vegas has been in a construction boom for a while now.

lots of money to be made there. of course, you can lose just as much.
 

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why is a good question, since it will drive a lot of your decisions.

I used to work in US-Canadian tax, so here are some of my thoughts:

1 - get your travel/immigration permits in order. If you ever decide to relocate down there, you don't want any past troubles to affect your immigration applications.

2 - don't accidentally trip into US tax residency (which is different from legal immigration residency). US tax residency is easy to trip into - just spend 183 "equivalent" days in the US over a 3 year period. If you do trip into tax residency, you will be required to file US tax returns. If yo u don't, then you will be in conflict with US laws, which could affect any future immigration plans (see #1).

3 - don't conduct business in the US (unless you intend to fully comply with US tax laws.) Even if you don't trip into tax-residency, you will still need to file tax returns if you have income connected to the US. Since you indicated you have a business in Canada, you might be tempted to conduct business when you travel in the US (i.e. answer business calls, conclude contracts etc).

4 - don't forget to review Nevada state tax issues. (theres no personal tax there, but there are corporate tax issues).
 

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Fast Pack Slow Guy
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Discussion Starter #9
Hmmm... intersting points, Polared. Thank you.

The "why" is really about improving my cost of living and climate.

I do plan on talking to US immigration about what we're capable of doing within legal parameters. I also plan on talking to a US immigration lawyer to get their take.

I also plan on moving my Canadian company to a Carribean tax shelter haven before moving to the States. Because my business runs solely online, it's easy to transport and operate from any location in the world, as long as I have an internet connection and all transactions and business is done virtually, there's no actualy merchandise being sold. But these tax issues are still very intersting and I really appreciate your tips.
 

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When I was in Vegas I looked housing while I was there.... its funny how much the city reminds me of Fargo when your off the strip. When I moved from the states to canada it wasn't a big deal for me since Im a dual citizen so I cant offer much. I will say do your research and dont take one customs officers word as the law. I found out trying to import my car. I was told one thing by one officer, threatened to get arrest by another, told I cant import at all without exporting first, etc etc. it became a huge pain in the ass. But lucky for me I had the title to my car so it was all good in the end. I just hope moving back wont pose as much of a problem.
 
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