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I ain't not no genius
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Discussion Starter #1
I've just bought a "ready-ramp", a canyon brace and tie-downs for my gixxer. I've got an f150 with a lift so i'm a bit nervous about loading and securing the bike. Any tips and/or advice as to how to do it safely? Any threads on this already? Never done it before. Thanks guys.
 

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Tough call. Personally, I would try to find some kind of loading dock. When I lived up north, there was a convenient hillock just outside my place that was perfectly level with my buddy's truck bed. Just wheeled the bike up and rolled it into the truck. No muss, no fuss.
 

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rain? whats that!
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Guys I've seen do it just stand to one side of the bike and clutch it up to the bed. As the bike goes up, you'll probably need something to stand on if youre of smaller stature
 
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any type of height difference, like a loading dock, certainly helps. a long ramp helps too, because you are not pushing harder to get the bike in the bed. it usually becomes a 2 person operation, with one pushing the bike into the bed, and the other grabbing it as the front wheel hits the tailgate. but if you are using a lift, you might want to see about some kind of extension fastened to it for the rear end of the bike. run the front end onto the lift, the rear wheel in a channel or something (strong enough to hold the bike obviously), and raise the bike to the bed. then roll it forward.

to strap the bike down, you only need to do the front end. figure out an ideal place for the straps that won't wreck your plastics. there are bar/triple tree straps specifically to aid this. cinch down the front end until the forks bottom out. this is critical. if you leave play in the suspension, when the bike bounces the strap hooks can come off. the rear end doesn't need to be secured. it won't go anywhere without the front end.

riding the bike up the ramp under power is risky. kinda like running a snowmobile up into a truck and having the throttle stick. the front end of the sled goes thru the rear window of the truck, and you are now a projectile.
 

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Why me?
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I had an F350 to load the bike into for a couple of years. I always had 2 ramps. One for the bike and the other to walk on. I always put the bike in 1st gear and walked the bike up the ramp while walking next to it on the other ramp. It takes a little geting use to, but pushing the bike up the ramp is NOT a wise choice. I have sen too many people drop the bike and even on themselves. Dont bother with the tie downs for the back tire. It's not needed. Hope this helps.
 

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slipknot said:
I had an F350 to load the bike into for a couple of years. I always had 2 ramps. One for the bike and the other to walk on. I always put the bike in 1st gear and walked the bike up the ramp while walking next to it on the other ramp. It takes a little geting use to, but pushing the bike up the ramp is NOT a wise choice. I have sen too many people drop the bike and even on themselves. Dont bother with the tie downs for the back tire. It's not needed. Hope this helps.
Thats how my friend chris always loads his cbr600rr into his f150. 2 ramps, one for the bike and one for his legs!
 

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I ain't not no genius
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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the tip about the forks especially, never thought of that. i'll get myself some kinda of a step thingy to walk up as i throttle her along the ramp. btw, this what i've bought, it looke skookum and is nice and long with 2 hinge points for a very gradual arch. i bought the 1000lb rated one

http://www.readyramp.com/
 
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I have same issue getting my drit bike in/out of the chev. Since it is higher you are definately better off being on a hill so that you are facing down it, creates less of an angel to push up. I never personally have the bike on or clutch it up the ramp, seems way to risky, even with the undestructible dirt bike. Also get something to stand on to make your life alot easier.

So get the bike well ligned up with the ramp and push it up. A second person to help push the rear and hold the other side is worthwhile for sure. The bike is not heavy until you get it on a ramp! Make sure your truck is on enough of a decline that your fairings will not bottom out on the edge of the truck bed...

Once it's in, use tiedowns to secure the front end against the box near the cab. Use tiedowns in the opposite way that you normally would, so that the tightening latch is on the non-bike end. Wrap the other end around the fork and hook it onto itself. Tighten them down to load the suspension, and you can use another set for the rear end if you want, although it really isnt necessary.

hope this helps and makes sense.
 

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You said yo uhave a lift on your truck? My best advise is to back it into a ditch before loading. It will get the rear of the truck way down for you and make it much easier to load.

Gary
 

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glowing ghostie!
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Good suggestions above. Nothing I can add especially, except that while it's freaky at first (OSHITIMAGONNADROPIT!) after a few times you get used to how it feels. After a while you get comfortable man-handling it around.

But the first few times definitely have a friend there, if only to help you figure out the best way to do things and get you out of jams if there's a mistake.
 

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I always ride it in much easier and less chances of slipping the rear wheel off when powering up a ramp. If you can ride in a straight line you can ride up a ramp.
 

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It's a good idea to use a strap to tie the ramp to the rear bumper of the truck. This will prevent the ramp from sliding out and moving around on you.
Also, if you're using a Canyon Dancer, be careful not to cinch it down to tight. I've seen clip-on's snap in two when tightened to much. It's always better to use the triples as the tie-down point.
 
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I have a 8" wide ramp and just ride her in (F-150). I do find that removing the tailgate makes things easier. The ramp rests on the rear bumper and transitions into the box better(bumper a lil lower than box), and keeps it from sliding forward. I've never tied the rear down, even with 2 bikes in the back. If yur drivin crazy enough to have the ass end swing out, you deserve damage.
I'll second the Canyon Dancer, its the shizznit. :rockon

If yur gunna ride it in, MAKE SURE you have clearance. getting hung up on your fairings/exhaust 1/2 way in could get ugly.
 

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One thing that Ive seen guys do is bring a piece of wood, maybe 6" or 8" tall, then back their front tires onto the block. This will make the bed alot lower to get the bike on and should make it quite a bit easier.
 

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Ya jacked up FORD country. if your truck is too jacked up you will high-centre the bike on the lip of the ramp and tailgate. i really would try to find a bit of a hill or something to minimize the angle. also if you are using tie-downs tie them in a knot after you have cinched them so the don't get loose. and i would recommend having a friend help you roll it on.
 
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Be carefull whe oyu unload. have a frined stand on the end of the ramp, or it will slide out. We weld brackets onto or tailgates for the motor bikes because we do it so often. but if it is a once in a while thing it isn't worth it. Do tailgates last long with 450lb sport bikes and 200lb riders standing on them? I found that with the dirt bikes, that only way 225lb, they tend to curve and dent the tailgate pretty quick. Finding a slope to lower the bed hight sure is nice. And I can't help but mention for all those city folks, a "lift" means he raised the hight of the truck. :)
 

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I'm surprised nobody has talked about getting it off. Unless you are using a hill to reduce the angle, getting it off gets my heart rate up more than driving it in...by a lot.
 

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gixxerboygenius said:
I've just bought a "ready-ramp", a canyon brace and tie-downs for my gixxer. I've got an f150 with a lift so i'm a bit nervous about loading and securing the bike. Any tips and/or advice as to how to do it safely? Any threads on this already? Never done it before. Thanks guys.
I didn't even know you had a truck Darren.
 

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Why me?
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Backing it down is easy. I used to load 2 bikes in the back by myself. If you ride it up, your going to get hurt eventually. Dirt bikes are a couple hundred pounds, not 400. Nothing good comes out of playing tightrope with a 400 lb doorstop. like was said earlier you have to watch to see if your going to bottom the lower on the ramp. I wouldn't want to find that as I'm riding the bike near the top. If the bike falls over while walking it up then its a lesson learned, not a potential hospital visit. The EASIEST way is to get a trailer :)
 
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