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Discussion Starter #1
Day 1

Its a biggie, daylight to dark ride

https://goo.gl/maps/QppxQGVJVtM2

Its a 5 1/2 hour ride to Wasco then things start to ramp up to a fury of twisties into Little Alps (will see snow there)and then a desent down Anthony Lakes Hwy to Baker City.

Day 2

Start with a ride along the Snake River into Idaho to Cambridge then backtrack and do the Hells Canyon Loop. Less than half the distance of day 1 but will be a full days ride. Mega twisties.

Day 3

Starts with " The Little Dragon" so you really need to be awake bright and early. Then its mortorcycle heaven heading west on the John Day Hwy.

Day 4

Explore the east side of Mt St Helens up to Windy Point Lookout. Then head for Winthrope or ?

Riding mid week will see less traffic and motels will not need to be pre booked. Good dry weather for day 1 is a must so could alter the start date by a day if need be.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Awesome, but Day 1 is gonna be one helluva ride.
Sure is, Dwby and I did the same route last year. We were all checked in to the Flamingo in Baker City by 7:30 pm. Other than the initial piece of slab the roads on that route are going to be more or less traffic free on a week day. Probably see more wildlife than cages. If unforseen circumstances slow us down the 395 junction will be the decision making point north to Pendleton for night or enter the Umatilla National Forest and go for it!
 

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At this point I am in on this ride. The first day is a long one but looks like great times once the "slab" is done with. Please PM me with any other details you have. Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
At this point I am in on this ride. The first day is a long one but looks like great times once the "slab" is done with. Please PM me with any other details you have. Cheers!
Sounds great!
not may more details other than bringing a bike thats suited for this ride. Bike should weigh at least 500lbs and have a 250 km fuel range. Camping gear would be a good saftey precaution as we may be entering a remote high altitude forest in the mid to late afternoon on day 1.
 

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looks like a great outing. watch for wild-life - I chased a couple elk ( skittering hooves, just in front of me ) across the road last September in the section between Heppner and Ukiah... altho there are even more cows...
 

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Sounds great!
not may more details other than bringing a bike thats suited for this ride. Bike should weigh at least 500lbs and have a 250 km fuel range. Camping gear would be a good saftey precaution as we may be entering a remote high altitude forest in the mid to late afternoon on day 1.
why 500 lbs?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
why 500 lbs?

Sport tourers weigh in starting at around 700lbs for a reason, their designed for distance rides. Along with the fuel capacity,comfort, weather protection comes the big plus the saftey factor. You tire out on a light bike after a couple of days of distance riding.I have experienced this on my 500lb GS I could not keep up on some rides when it got windy out. We ride for fun getting blown into a barb wired fence at 120 km is where the fun stops real quick and on this ride we are going to see a lot of windmills.
 

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You tire out on a light bike after a couple of days of distance riding.
it's for sure true that ( bigger, heavier ) sport touring bikes do what they do really well, but I'll humbly suggest that back routes in the John Day corner of Oregon are not their natural home!
as well, as to the assertion in the posting that 'you tire out', that depends entirely on whether you get 'trained up' for it, plus 'how' you ride. ride lots, don't push the speeds to high, and stay active in the saddle, and it's quite possible to be rolling just fine 10 days into a succession of 10 hour days.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
it's for sure true that ( bigger, heavier ) sport touring bikes do what they do really well, but I'll humbly suggest that back routes in the John Day corner of Oregon are not their natural home!
as well, as to the assertion in the posting that 'you tire out', that depends entirely on whether you get 'trained up' for it, plus 'how' you ride. ride lots, don't push the speeds to high, and stay active in the saddle, and it's quite possible to be rolling just fine 10 days into a succession of 10 hour days.[/QUOTE]

Experience is huge for sure coupled with physicaly preparing your self for distance riding will certainly reward a determined rider. Agreed that a light bike will have a significant advantage in the tight twisties and be much more entertaining at it also but 10 10 hour days in the saddle will put the lighter bike behind a big old sport tourer by a day just on down time during fuel stops. Best thing would be to eliminate the slab with a trailer and get to the cream with with the fun bike.
 

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10 10 hour days in the saddle will put the lighter bike behind a big old sport tourer by a day just on down time during fuel stops.
heh heh, true that... and the larger the group, the bigger the deficit!


Best thing would be to eliminate the slab with a trailer and get to the cream with the fun bike.
ahh, wisdom dawns!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hmmm, still working on my light ADV bike project for now but one can always start dreaming about something that fits real well on a set of 17 inch rims.
 

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Have been meaning to write more on this thread over the last few days, but for some reason I cannot sign into my account from home. Consequently I am only able to contribute when in the office. Filterwrench, how many people are a "sure thing" for this ride? Curious to know. I ride a bike very similar to Don's (well I should say Don's former bike........sorry bud) and have found that an all day ride in the saddle of a sports naked bike is not an issue at all. If one is used to long rides on these type of bikes and is keen on riding it does not seem to pose an issue for me. Secondly, last year was the first year that I trailered the bike into the Kootenays and did some riding from a home base in Nelson BC. It was great and very handy to be able to carry things in the car which would otherwise not have be portable on the bike. Have you thought about trailering the bikes down to Issaquah and then riding from there? I am fine travelling either way. The car just allows more comfort and the slab of highway becomes much less tedious until we get to the twisty sections of road. Finally, I would like to make it to our first destination by the end of the day. Not too keen on sleeping in mountain passes even at that time of year. Hope you concur on that one.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
There are 2 of us confirmed for this ride, you would be the 3rd rider at this time. If you have done all day rides before then you already know what its all about which is great. Just making sure as its a shame for someone to show up unprepared and have issues that could have been sorted before the ride starts. Trailering to the Dalles would be a good idea if there is room for all the bikes. I chose the 410 route to eliminate some of the slab thru Washington if you have not been there its an ok road but if the weather is not ideal then I,m all for the trailer. I am also not keen on camping after a long day in the saddle last year we made it all the way to Baker City but on that last leg of the ride I had that feeling if we got held up near Little Alps it would be a night with the Owls. We will make the Hwy 395 junction the decision point and if the conditions are not ideal then Pendelton will be the destination for the night. We are starting this ride the day after the Hells Canyon Motorcycle Rally ends I have had the same timing on previous rides and the roads where deserted and accomodations were not a problem anywhere along the route so we will have the freedom to change up the route as we see fit.
Cheers
 

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why 500 lbs?

Sport tourers weigh in starting at around 700lbs for a reason, their designed for distance rides. Along with the fuel capacity,comfort, weather protection comes the big plus the saftey factor. You tire out on a light bike after a couple of days of distance riding.I have experienced this on my 500lb GS I could not keep up on some rides when it got windy out. We ride for fun getting blown into a barb wired fence at 120 km is where the fun stops real quick and on this ride we are going to see a lot of windmills.
i agree with this actually, although I somewhat didnt mind touring on the R1 it still felt 'SMALL' out in the real world.

being able to ride along side heavy trucks , usual pita traffic and all that its nice to not be tossed around every-time you go for a pass.
I rode in and out of Vegas a few years back. On the R6 i was basically sideways, pretty much same deal on the R1 as heavy winds would
cut across the road and if you took your attention off the road for 5 seconds you were on the next lane or riding grass damn quick :D
 
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