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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:eek

I am completing my course at PRS and was told specifically by Dat/Mark, not to buy this bike. However I am completely in love with this bike and determined to master the power.

Please feel free to give me pointers on how to tame this beast. I have successfully rode this bike down Westminister Highway to Yamaha at 90kph in 1st gear (a lowly 7000 rpm; talk about power to spare) :eek; slowly learning the art of slow hands (slow and easy throttling).

Wish me good luck for those who are lucky and pray for me for those who are religous, and finally give me wisdom from those who are wise; yes it is too late for a refund on the bike :p

Ralphael
 

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contradiction incarnate
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ummmm... R1?

trade it in or just sell it and buy something smaller/slower.
 

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contradiction incarnate
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survival of the fittest? or the weeding out of noobies on R1s? :p
as in "The Darwin Awards"... people removing themselves from the population so as to not further propagate their own flawed "seed"
 

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n00b
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Not to sound like a broken record, but this bike is WAY TOO POWERFUL FOR YOU, let alone the majority of people who actually own them too.

On top of that, why would you spend $600 to learn how to ride from professionals and then when they give you the most important piece of information, you choose to ignore it?

For the sake of your learning curve and life, sell the bike, take the hit, get a smaller bike and start fresh. I know that there are people on this site who have started on big bikes and lived to tell about it and have become competent riders, but those are few and far between. Sorry if what I am typing is difficult to read, but it is what it is.
 
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Put it this way, you will not even use 50% of the potential of this bike on the street let alone the race track. Ride Safe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Not to sound like a broken record, but this bike is WAY TOO POWERFUL FOR YOU, let alone the majority of people who actually own them too.

On top of that, why would you spend $600 to learn how to ride from professionals and then when they give you the most important piece of information, you choose to ignore it?

For the sake of your learning curve and life, sell the bike, take the hit, get a smaller bike and start fresh. I know that there are people on this site who have started on big bikes and lived to tell about it and have become competent riders, but those are few and far between. Sorry if what I am typing is difficult to read, but it is what it is.
Thanks grandshervee for your wisdom.

Perhaps the best way I can describe my emotions at this time after a full day of riding is that this bike really feels dangerous and it really pumps up the adrenaline in learning how to control the bike (and this is only going around the neighborhood at 15kph).

Just a side note for everyone, I am not a youngster that bought this bike for speed; think middle age. Speed is the farthest thing from my mind and yes I doubt that I would ever use a fraction of its power; although racing this bike in two years from now has crossed my mind

So why buy this? a friend sold it to me at a price that matches a 600, it was available at the right time, the beauty of the bike, the power of fear, the power of adrenalin and simply the knowledge that if I master this bike I can master any other.

It would be nice to hear some constructive advice on how to handle this type of bike.

The worst case scenario would be the removal of thyself from the population.

Ralphael
 

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contradiction incarnate
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you can have a blast racing a much slower bike than that.

a new rider is a new rider... it's only a little better that you're not just past puberty.

most people don't even "master" a 600

edit: it's not so much that it's a dangerous bike, but a bike that's dangerous in your situation
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was really hoping for better feedback then the naysayers out there.

but I will share what I have discovered with the R1 in comparison the limited experience I had with the bikes at PRS.

This bike is very responsive. Countersteering and counterbalancing is very easy on this bike. In fact even at low speeds countersteering can be used to turn.

I cover the clutch constantly in order to control any unintentional throttle surges and I patiently use only my forefinger and thumb to control the throttle and only two fingers to cover the front brakes; a full hand grip is simply too much temptation for a sudden hard stop on these brakes.

The seating angle is also very different from the bikes we use to train at PRS; thus I am constantly reminded not to put any weight on the handlebars and to relax my elbows, wrist etc.

Feel free to continue commenting...

Ralphael
 

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Typical R1 owner...
 

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Exactly what slam said, most people don't even master 600s. B/C you got such a smoking deal on this R1, why don't you sell it? You actually wouldn't lose any money. And depending on how close you are with your friend, you may choose to split the profit so as to maintain the friendship. Then you can go and buy a bandit or a katana, learn on that, drop it (and not worry nearly as much), and move up the ladder.

The major problem with starting a big engined bike is that you will not push yourself as hard as you might on an older bike (fear of dropping and extra dollars to repair the new bike). I have heard people say that they will push themselves really hard, but to that I say, what if you had a beater instead. Would you push it that much more (of course, in a safe manner)?
Also, a litre bike can take you somewhere you didn't want to go before you even get a chance to finish your blink.

As an aside, I started on a 250cc. Trust me when I say that that bike got me into hairy situations more than enough times to give me an adrenaline rush. Sure it didn't go 250 km/h, but straights aren't everything. You will find it much more exhilerating to take a corner an extra 10 km/h than going faster an extra 50 km/h. It is a totally different sensation.
 

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Ralphael, keep this in mind. It is 2am, most sane people are sleeping. Some of the advocates have gone on and on about litre bikes being bad for first time riders (hell, even multi-year riders) so many times that they can't be bothered anymore. Many other advocates will come online (in the morning) and tell you that it is a jeopardy to your safety and ours that you start on a Litre bike. A sticky has even been made made at the top of the New Rider Forum for people just like you to read and to understand why it is important to work up the ladder. You can try and justify the bike, but from experience, almost all will say it is a bad decision.

I know you weren't expecting this type of reception when joining BCSB, but we say these things because we don't like seeing fellow riders injure themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Exactly what slam said, most people don't even master 600s. B/C you got such a smoking deal on this R1, why don't you sell it? You actually wouldn't lose any money. And depending on how close you are with your friend, you may choose to split the profit so as to maintain the friendship. Then you can go and buy a bandit or a katana, learn on that, drop it (and not worry nearly as much), and move up the ladder.

The major problem with starting a big engined bike is that you will not push yourself as hard as you might on an older bike (fear of dropping and extra dollars to repair the new bike). I have heard people say that they will push themselves really hard, but to that I say, what if you had a beater instead. Would you push it that much more (of course, in a safe manner)?
Also, a litre bike can take you somewhere you didn't want to go before you even get a chance to finish your blink.

As an aside, I started on a 250cc. Trust me when I say that that bike got me into hairy situations more than enough times to give me an adrenaline rush. Sure it didn't go 250 km/h, but straights aren't everything. You will find it much more exhilerating to take a corner an extra 10 km/h than going faster an extra 50 km/h. It is a totally different sensation.
Thanks for taking the time to give out advice grandshervee.

A few years ago, I sold my beloved Miatta to my friend and thus a few years later he sells me his beloved R1. Along with his R1, it comes with a poster and a small matchbox R1 for my desk. A lot of love went into that bike, including an Akrapovic Exhaust system, Steel brake cables and a fender kit. Until the day that I bought this bike, I never could understand how someone could love a bike. He sold it to me because he knew that it would be cherished.

The power has already gotten me into trouble more then once and it was sheer luck, or perhaps PRS training, that saved me and that was the constant covering of the clutch. I cannot drop my guard even for an instance.

All bikes are dangerous and the only main difference is how quickly it can get you into trouble; with the R1, it is instantaneous. Even sitting on the bike pumps my adrenaline.

There is a plus to the R1 though... and that is you never have to shift it out of 1 :D

Now in regards to pushing oneself, such as taking corners just a bit more tighter will have no bearing on the condition of the bike. We are encouraged to drop, kick, fall with PRS bikes, but our own instincts prevents us; we are more afraid of harming ourselves regardless of the bike.

The R1 will probably push me into a higher skill level quickly and all I have to do is survive the next year to learn all it has to teach me.

Already my cornering has improved just by the fact that the R1 countersteers so readily. I listened to the lessons from PRS about feeding the instruction to the bike, relax and let the bike take you for the ride. This is the first bike (comparing to the ones used for training at PRS) that actually works in this manner; push right and it literally pulls you through the corner.

I am learning quickly.... and I have to...

Thanks again for your words and time...

Ralphael
 

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contradiction incarnate
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you're limiting your progress as a rider in exchange for cherishing the machine

edit: all the things you talk about enjoying on the R1 can be had with, for example, an R6.
going with a smaller output bike first will let you learn the lessons more quickly with a lower likelyhood of dire consequences should something turn sour.
 

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As far as the 'my bike handles great' busines goes, trust me when i started for some reason i also had some major false ideas that i could control a bike. It is only after a test of time that i realized how much little i could at that time, and what a good idea it's to listen to the people more experienced than you. In addition, this bike you seem to love so much, chances are you will drop it or wreck it seeing as to how its your first bike. Especially how you are a 'middle aged' man, i would imagine the learning curve is steeper for you than most of us 'dumb and young' guys because we're better at physically adapting to new scenarios.

From the sounds of it, ralphael isn't interested in anyone's opinion. I really do wonder why you even bothered posting here, or even are taking the PRS course.
Its like you're asking us how to 'properly' use a noose, and the people on this board and PRS are trying to talk you out of using a noose. And yet you simply aren't willing to listen and are interested in 'pointers on how to use a noose'. As a last note, i would really question the intentions of your friend. I dont think someone with a conscience would sell an R1 to a new rider, not to mention you're his 'friend'.
 

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Whoopdee do dah. You bought a litre bike. And an R1 at that. Below 7000rpms (which it appears is where you ride this thing) R1's are dogs anyways. You couldn't tell if you are on a 600 or a 1000 for the most part.

Take it out of second gear for god's sake you idiot. 1st, by it very nature is a choppy gear, hence the "surges" you mention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Alright everyone.... loosen up

we all agree that Ralphael is
1. a middle age idiot
2. doesn't listen to anyone
3. owns a R1 and think he is all that
4. deprieved as a child

and we all agree that Ralphael should
1. trade into an R6
2. or sell it
3. not be owning an R1 (you should be).

Now lets get past that because none of the above are options (especially the idiot part :p )

why bother to teach or even post to ralpahel when he is going to kill himself anyways?

because you might be giving out the one pointer that may save his life.

Surprisingly I learnt something tonight.. after reading the many posts in this place I do not wish to meet up with any of you (no not riding, but not even just for coffee). The school PRS makes you feel that all motorcyclist are family but it seems that it is not true. You have your own world and that is where you like to stay.

You all seem to need to vent that anger somewhere and that there is an idiot on our forums bragging about his R1, so lets rag on him.

I intentionally made the title to attract you but not for you to attack my personal values. So by all means get it off your chest that there is indeed a noob riding a R1 and he is an middle age idiot, and if you wish get the admin to ban this idiot from posting please do so. It will save me a lot of typing.

Now this middle age idiot does know how to work the clutch smoothly, no stalls, no sudden jerks, however I am using a lot of clutch to smooth this bike out. Is this normal?

Should I be shifting it into 2nd even though my rpms are only 4000? at 7000 I did shift into 2nd and to my untrain ears, the engine sounded less stress, but perhaps this isn't good for the engine?

To keep myself from the overly sensitive throttle and brakes, I am using only open fingers and palms now. No tight grips. The other hand is always riding the clutch.

Thanks ahead of time for any other suggestions.

Ralphael
 
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