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My stupid car decides to quit on me and I've got to put a new engine.:surrender I'm gona have to use my motorcycle through the winter and I need advice on how to deal with it. I've ridden in the rain and it's not bad but only in the summer time, no leaves or cold roads and black ice. Any suggestions will be appreciated. Thanks in advance and how many people only have their motorcylce as transportation?
 

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Make sure you have good rain gear. Glove, boots included. The shittiest feeling in the world is riding when your hands or feet are wet.
 

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One Lump Sum
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Dress ridiculously warm? More layers the better. I don't even ride in the morning now.
 

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Black ice, snow, and shady spots on those clear days, suck.

I tried to ride a dual sport home from college during a snow storm and I fell over every ten feet. I was punch drunk from hitting the ground. Had to give up and walk home. It was a long ways.

Good luck and try not to hurt yourself.
 

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havent ridin in fresh snow but on ice i find its best to feather or lightly pump the rear brake, dont touch the front. take the good advice dont cheap on winter gear. especially gloves, i had technic leather gloves and cheap $1 cotton gloves underneath buy the time i got home i could barely pull the clutch in.
 

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Just take it easy, assume no emergency braking. I don't ride in ice or snow, I'd recommend the same. You're just asking for a good view of your bike on its side. Treat wet leaves as loose gravel, no braking or turning. And yeah, the road is cold, especially in the morning. Less traction.

But really, if you have some decent gear, it's not that bad. Take it easy, avoid the stuff that you already know will be treacherous, take it easy. And take it easy.
 
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Also, try and ride in one to two gears higher than you normally would, cuts down on the tourque, which means less wheel slip.
 

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When you are expecting snow take the bus. Far cheaper than repairing fairings... just in case.

On sportbikes we're used to the front brake doing the lion's share of the work. But in the wet it's definetly a 50-50 deal. The front can actually take more but it's FAR easier to deal with a rear end slide than a front end lockup and dump. Use the rear during these 50-50 stops as an idicator of what conditions are and how much you can get away with on the front. If you NEED more front then squeeze it on real easy while slightly easing off the rear to let it re-connect. Easy to say and far harder to do when you're racing towards a rear bumper..... which brings us to the NEXT item. LEAVE MORE ROOM IN THE WET! ! ! ! ! I know it's likely common sense but common sense ain't so common these days. That and old (dry) habits are hard to kick.
 

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Ridin hard n dirty
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If you have ridden in the rain in summer it's the same as winter...except colder...if it is raining it is always gona be above freezing....otherwize you get snow, the worst time is when it is sunny and cold then you need to be aware of those shady spots that the sun dont shine on and it is still frosty there....dont piss around with layers it may get too constricting...the best investment if you already have a good jacket and pants is a heated vest...put that on your xmas wish list...then look into heated grips....that way you can ride with thinner gloves which again makes riding way more comfortable and you have better control.....oh last is to buy a factory fog free shield ...dont waste time or money on after market wipe ons......if you cant see...well it sucks....
 

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I try to stay off side streets where the leaves are slippery and roads tend to frost. Especially in the morning and at night. Stick to main roads. Don't underestimate frost and ice. Especially if you're riding a sportbike, your tires will not perform in any desireable way in snow, ice, or frost! You will have absolute zero grip on both tires and chances are better than 90% that you'll dump! The rain is good as it makes the roads consistent and predictable.

All that being said, just pay attention to the road conditions and you'll be fine. Good luck.
 

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Lots of good advice already. I never ride in ice or snow. Go slow, don't lean, don't twist the throttle, go easy on (both) brakes and don't fall. Treat it like a tool, not a toy.
 

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Prepare for a lot of corrosion damage to fasteners and other bits on your bike once the salt gets on the road.
 

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so far everyone has good points. Here is my 2 cents (from about 12 winters on a bike): Lower your PSI: 27(ish) in front and about 30PSI in rear. Get a heated vest. Get some good boots and gloves. Dont make any (or many) velocity changes unless you are straight up. Don't go over any wet leaves, manhole covers or painted lines unless you are straight up...If caught in the snow only use back brake. (I have riden many sport bikes through the winter, so it is do-able) However, I would much prefer to do it on a dual sport!
 
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