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Guess it depends on what you mean by newbie. Is this an official status, or a state of mind?

The day I think I have nothing left to learn, or no riding skill that can be improved, is the day I stop riding. 'Cause I'll be down next ride for sure.

Perhaps it's the day that another rider can watch you ride into a parking lot and not think "newbie". I have a friend who's been riding for a year, I don't consider her a newbie anymore but another co-worker has been riding for years, second bike, commutes to work etc but I see him ride he's a newbie.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm not sure.. I was talking with someone and seasoned riders came up... and he asked what is a seasoned rider.. well what makes a seasoned rider? not being a newbie? what makes a newbie.. if you leave the realm of newbie does that make you seasoned? and/or experienced? regardless of time or actual miles, is it skill?

I agree, there's always something new to learn so in that sense everyone could be considered newbish in some way in some context.
 

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I have a friend who's been riding for a year, I don't consider her a newbie anymore but another co-worker has been riding for years, second bike, commutes to work etc but I see him ride he's a newbie.
yeah time on the bike can have nothing to do with it. you could have someone who does an intro rider course, does an art course and does a race school all inside of 6 months and be a very competent rider if they focus on it. on the other hand you can have clowns who have been "riding" for years but don't posess even basic street skills.

in one word; smoothness is what seperates a newb from a competent rider.
 

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It's an interesting question. I would say a large part of what makes an experienced or seasoned rider is how comfortable and confident they are when they're riding. If you feel you can make your bike do what you want it to do in typical situations, you're no longer a newbie. But if you're still at its mercy, or get unexpected reactions, you're not experienced in that part of riding. A rider may be experienced on the track, but a newbie when it comes to parking lot skills.

And some people get there much faster than others.

Can Rossi do a U-turn inside 20'? I wonder.
 

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The ability to make a few basic reactions/saves, in common bad situations... ie: slightly overcooking a corner, slight front/backwheel skid/slide, emergency stop... and the ability to keep yourself out of the bad situations.
 

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I know some riders who have ridden for 10+ years, put tens of thousands of miles (some evn 100s) and they still consider themselves newbies. I dont worry too much about monikers associated with new riders really. There are newbies out there that are better riders after few seasons of riding then some seasoned old veterans.
 

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I thought I was a newbie until I started riding with others. I then realized that the years of KMs and schooling had obviously taken me out of the novice category.

However I am now a total road racing newb, but a seasoned track rider.

You are always learning and progressing, putting titles on anything is very tricky.
 

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lover of twins
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I thought I was a newbie until I started riding with others. I then realized that the years of KMs and schooling had obviously taken me out of the novice category.

However I am now a total road racing newb, but a seasoned track rider.

You are always learning and progressing, putting titles on anything is very tricky.
that sounds like something a cop would say. have you changed jobs?
 

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Ok..........so I thought about this a little more over the past 30 days. The question posed really intrigues me. This is what I came up with:

When you ride through a turn and continually adjust your line, even if its only a few inches, then I would say you are no longer a "Newbie".

Riders say "I wanna follow you to see your lines". On a track? Sure, my lines is garbage. On the street? Um, there are like 10 really short lines linked all together around just one turn on a mountain road like the Duffy for example. LOL

Racers don't need to alternate scanning between the exit of a turn and the surface like a street rider does. Different

***I was also going to include "...and instinctively adjust your line...." , but I might be stretching it a little there.
 

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When your skill isnt based around the things you can do in regards to what you're expecting (like going fast on a road you know), but when your skill is based around the things you can do and how you react to the things you didnt expect....
 

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To determine noob... you look for the parked bike and hit the killswitch.

If the rider goes back to the bike to leave and proceeds to spend 10 minutes trying to figure out why it won't start... and starts asking other folks
if they know why his bike wont' start... or calling BCAA... you know it's noob.
 

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I was redoing the landscaping of my front yard when a fellow stopped in front of my house with a flat tire about two weeks ago. I noticed his tire, and observed him reading his owners manual, and asked him if he needed help. Rather than accepting my help, he said no thanks with just the right amount of indignation to let me know he was offended. Some time later he was calling BCAA since he had placed his jack under bodywork and had made a nice big dent in his SUV. He was embarrassed for sure, but tried to play it cool.

Newbie, in my opinion is a state of mind AS WELL as a skill point for any given task or function.
 

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Keith Code, in "Twist of the Wrist", talks about $10 of attention. The idea is you only ever have $10 of attention and you use less of that $10 to merely operate the vehicle as you gain skill/experience. A seasoned racer might use only $.50 to operate the bike and the rest of the attention is on race strategy.
So I would say a noob uses $3 or more of attention to operate the vehicle.
I encourage anyone to read the book - esp. that section. It really applies to anything you do.
 
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