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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Let me start off with, I have been riding for around 16 years and have loved every second of it. I now have the itch to ride on a track as riding on the street is not the same and there is a lot of fear of tickets etc lol. I have a few questions about how to get started and the best approach to doing so as budget I am sure is going to be an issue.

I am well equipped with gear so I am ok in that area. So my first question is: would buying a Ninja 250 or a CBR 125 be a good way to start on the track to learn and practice with? I want to keep the costs way down for a track bike if possible and just wast sure if this would be a good starting point.
What is a good starter for track as I don't want to put my bike I ride on the street in the dirt lol.

My plan is to do a WMRC Race School and go that route to get myself going and do some private lessons as well if budget allows.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 

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as a first step, I'd suggest just riding your current bike. ( a) it's plenty fast - in fact, much faster than you'll be able to manage initially on track, and (b) you're familiar with it. it is a SERIOUS challenge to get anywhere near competent on a track: learning the layout, the lines, the braking points, body positioning, etc, etc. plus you'll be attacking corners in ways and at speeds that you'd never, ever consider on the street. adding 'learning a bike' into the mix is not trivial.

yes, you might bin it, but that's pretty unlikely if you are careful with your judgments early on... and fear will probably help towards that end! then, if you love it, go the full-on track bike route... after a few 'test rides'.

( the bonus is that after a couple track sessions, your confidence in the ability of you AND your bike to deal with pretty much anything will soar.)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
as a first step, I'd suggest just riding your current bike. ( a) it's plenty fast - in fact, much faster than you'll be able to manage initially on track, and (b) you're familiar with it. it is a SERIOUS challenge to get anywhere near competent on a track: learning the layout, the lines, the braking points, body positioning, etc, etc. plus you'll be attacking corners in ways and at speeds that you'd never, ever consider on the street. adding 'learning a bike' into the mix is not trivial.

yes, you might bin it, but that's pretty unlikely if you are careful with your judgments early on... and fear will probably help towards that end! then, if you love it, go the full-on track bike route... after a few 'test rides'.

( the bonus is that after a couple track sessions, your confidence in the ability of you AND your bike to deal with pretty much anything will soar.)

I appreciate all the info. I understand the using what your comfortable with makes a lot of sense. I have a feeling that I will just get the bug when I do it once and that will be game over lol. For me it will be learning how to actually track ride as we all know the street is no where near the same. Again appreciate the info!!
 

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A cbr 125 is a waste of time and money. A 250 would be fine for sure. Do some Pitt Meadows track days to get yourself some exposure on the cheap
and for sure the wmrc race school is probably a great idea and some track days if they have some. Most local guys are doing track days down in Shelton
Washington. Your bang for buck is good and the track is high quality compared to mission.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A cbr 125 is a waste of time and money. A 250 would be fine for sure. Do some Pitt Meadows track days to get yourself some exposure on the cheap
and for sure the wmrc race school is probably a great idea and some track days if they have some. Most local guys are doing track days down in Shelton
Washington. Your bang for buck is good and the track is high quality compared to mission.
Ok cool thank you, I was leaning more towards a 250 as I just feel like it would be a good way to learn on the track so I don't put my 10R in the dirt that I just spent a small fortune to make perfect again lol. I am for sure signing up for Race School 100% as soon as they post it. I feel this is the best way to learn and I have a friend that wants to do the Semi Private lessons as well. So I already feel pretty invested lol. I think I want to get a couple pit meadows days in as well if its a cheap alternative to learn. Thanak you guys for the info I really appreciate it and already cant wait till next season lol.
 

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Riders that have never done a track day almost always say "but I don't want to crash my bike!"

If "track day" really meant "crash your bike day" no one would ever go to one of those! Luckily that isn't the case at all.

If you ride curves on the road without crashing why does having the curves linked together in a closed circuit make you suddenly unable to cope?

You'll be starting in a beginner group, starting at a slow pace, being led around by someone that knows what the hell they are doing. You can build speed slowly at your own pace and you aren't going to feel any pressure to go any faster than you want to go.

Everyone who has done track days has been in your shoes and I assure you the VAST majority of them did not buy a different bike for their first track day.

Start with a Pitt Meadows track day. The staff is super friendly and the events are not intimidating at all. Just do it, you'll have a great time.
 

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^^^ exactly what StevieMac said! crashes at track days are actually quite rare. you sound like a mature, self-aware person - just 'go at your own pace', and you'll be grinning from ear to ear in your helmet, plus - after the first day or two - remarkably overjoyed that you are wringing it out on your ZX10R and not a machine with 20% of the horsepower, poorer suspension, and less-than-stellar brakes (... unless you spend considerable money on upgrades, of course).
 

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Join us at Pitt Meadows in 2020 to get some seat time on your bike in a closed course environment. As already stated, we have very few riders who crash and more learn what their motorcycles are truly capable of doing.

Here's the link to our website if you want to snoop around a bit: www.pittmeadowstrackdays.ca

Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Riders that have never done a track day almost always say "but I don't want to crash my bike!"

If "track day" really meant "crash your bike day" no one would ever go to one of those! Luckily that isn't the case at all.

If you ride curves on the road without crashing why does having the curves linked together in a closed circuit make you suddenly unable to cope?

You'll be starting in a beginner group, starting at a slow pace, being led around by someone that knows what the hell they are doing. You can build speed slowly at your own pace and you aren't going to feel any pressure to go any faster than you want to go.

Everyone who has done track days has been in your shoes and I assure you the VAST majority of them did not buy a different bike for their first track day.

Start with a Pitt Meadows track day. The staff is super friendly and the events are not intimidating at all. Just do it, you'll have a great time.
^^^ exactly what StevieMac said! crashes at track days are actually quite rare. you sound like a mature, self-aware person - just 'go at your own pace', and you'll be grinning from ear to ear in your helmet, plus - after the first day or two - remarkably overjoyed that you are wringing it out on your ZX10R and not a machine with 20% of the horsepower, poorer suspension, and less-than-stellar brakes (... unless you spend considerable money on upgrades, of course).
Join us at Pitt Meadows in 2020 to get some seat time on your bike in a closed course environment. As already stated, we have very few riders who crash and more learn what their motorcycles are truly capable of doing.

Here's the link to our website if you want to snoop around a bit: www.pittmeadowstrackdays.ca

Nancy
Well I guess this is all I have to hear lol. Thank you all of you for the info. I think your statement doser makes a lot of sense lol. I do want to bring the 10R out there and really learn the bike and what it can actually do. I have a grin ear to ear every time I get on a motorcycle no matter where I am and assume this will be an increase to that grin on the track haha. Well I guess I will go with what you all have said and run what I have and then progress from there. Thank you everyone for your advice. This is what I love the community just good honest people sharing the same passion. Appreciate it everyone!! Cant wait to meet you all!!
 

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I agree with the Pitt Meadows Track Day idea. It's very low pressure and the risk of serious damage to your bike is very low. There's nothing to hit if you go down. The bike will just slide on the endless pavement.
 

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I'm 58. I started riding at the age of 12, but stopped around 25 and then didn't ride again until 45. I forgot how much I loved bikes, so I started doing track days soon after I bought my first litre bike. But first track day in, I turfed it simply because someone cut me off at a corner and I end up going wide and into a pile of dirt. Luckily I wasn't hurt, but the bike was a write off.

So then I got smart and took a course with Keith Code of California Superbikes. It was the best thing I ever did for myself. Keith's a good teacher, especially for beginners. But any course is a smart decision. I then bought a dedicated track bike. A used gsxr 600 for $2500 and rode that for a couple good years. I even low sided it, but it was easy to fix because parts are so ubiquitous.

Then, I bought a SV650, which is an even better bike for the track. Over the next couple of years I made it up to the advanced group, which is where I sit now. I've been lucky that I had good mentors, but I believe my costly mistake at the beginning is what showed me how to do it properly. I now ride a litre bike, but even that is too fast for the track. I am looking for a 600 with traction control.

Take a course. Get a cheap track bike, an SV650 or cbr 250- ninja300 is a great way to begin. Go slow and smooth at first. Don't even think about going fast, just smooth. The speed will come naturally. And you'll live to enjoy it for a long time.
 
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