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For those of you who have been to racing school what's the proper way to do it? I would think it would go something like, rolling off the throttle, then downshifting and then applying the brakes gently.

Would you apply both the front and rear brake at the same time or would you apply the front first then the rear?
 

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Wanderer of the Wastes
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now I've never been to any sort of motorcycle schooling, but I'd say you jam on the breaks, and downshift like mad. seems to work for me.
 

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dig your heels in too :D..
don't hit the rear brakes too hard. you gonna end up locking up the rear (i did this) and lowsiding at best (i didn't do that yet).
 
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Miteorite said:
dig your heels in too :D..
don't hit the rear brakes too hard. you gonna end up locking up the rear (i did this) and lowsiding at best (i didn't do that yet).
Ditto on the rear brake comment. I've made this mistake many times, once with expensive consequences, (if lowsiding is the best case scenario, I guess I went with the worst case scenario, I HIGHSIDED!!)

Come on racers speak up!! We want to hear what you'ce got to say!!
 
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Sounds good to me, except for me it goes the same but without the rear brake. Just a personal thing but I don't find any advantage to using it when I am braking hard as it just makes the bike go all squirmy and I don't really like squirmy....
 

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glowing ghostie!
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N.A Honda said:
For those of you who have been to racing school what's the proper way to do it? I would think it would go something like, rolling off the throttle, then downshifting and then applying the brakes gently.

Would you apply both the front and rear brake at the same time or would you apply the front first then the rear?
I assume you are talking about stopping as quick as possible? Ie. an emergency stop?

Do the blip-and-downshift if you are looking ahead to a corner, but if it's a true emergency just pull in the clutch and tap-tap-tap down to first.

Squeeze the brake smoothly, allow the front suspension to compress, then continue to brake until you feel the front start to chatter.

Use your rear brake. Just be ready to ease off if you start to lockup. If the front locks up, release IMMEDIATELY!

And try to do all this in a straight line. You can apply all the traction of the tires into braking.
 

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Jackie Chan's stuntdouble
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The rear brake is useful to transfer weight onto the front wheel, but will not be good for much once that has happened.

The front brake should be applied gradually at first, but hard once the weight has transferred.
 
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If you actually pull the front brake in smoothly loading the front you will never see chatter in the front wheel (assuming a good road surface). If you get chatter in the front wheel, you didn't load the front properly. You may also feel the bike start to squirm a little if you are braking real hard.
 
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braking

Practice, practice practice.
Up and down your street any where safe.
Practice just the front brake, harder and harder lowering your center of gravity then ever so gently practice your back brake only. Don't lock it but get as close as possible. Now combine them. You should be able to grab the front pretty quick keeping yourself down low behind the bars.
If you find yourself needing tires, practice controlled skids before you replace them. It may save your life!!
 

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damn rear brakes!

ok im going home down granville, and what happens? i look down at the speedo for a split second, and when i look up the traffic is stopped. what do i do? i hit the rear brake, like there's no tomorrow. then i realize that i hit the rear brake and grab a handful of the front brake. i stop hard, my rear tire screeches :( this sucks. and i've been practicing and practicing with the front.

i guess my mind remmebers all that bicycle riding.

point: grab front!
 

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In order to lower your centre of gravity, is it a good idea to stand on your pegs and raise your ass just barely off the seat? When cornering, or slowspeed steering this is used to settle the bike a little, seeing as how the pegs are the lowest leverage point on the bike.

I've never tried this while emergency stopping but it makes sense to try and lower the centre of gravity this way.
 

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OK, this is coming straight from my track school and the Test n' Tune day I just had.

For really hard braking as in a panic stop or just because you want to try it you would pull in the clutch and gently and progressively over the course of about 1/4 to1/2 second squeeze the shit outa the front brake lever while keeping your toe decidedley away from the rear brake lever. Any faster than that and you risk shocking the suspension and a resulting lockup.

The reason you pull in the clutch is because with the low idle speeds we use on the street the engine braking along will be enough to lock up the rear under this sort of heavy braking and the rear can start chattering which will throw off the whole bike.

Ideally if you could manage this you would hold on just a touch of throttle to hold the idle at about 3K. But that's nutz for the street and in a panic so just pull in the clutch and stop. If you think about it snick the lever down a few taps as you go so that you're ready for a quick squirt if needed.

BTW. On clean dry pavement with warmish tires you're probably in more danger of a forward loop than a lockup. A buddy of mine had to panic stop on the street one day when he discovered the truck in front of his had halted while he was doing something he shouldn't have been. The rear bumper of the truck contacted his bike leaving a small little crack........... in the front fairing just below the windscreen of his 9R......... and it wasn't a jacked up truck, just a normal compact pickup. Yep, he stoppie'd right into it.
 
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Sewman said:
In order to lower your centre of gravity, is it a good idea to stand on your pegs and raise your ass just barely off the seat? When cornering, or slowspeed steering this is used to settle the bike a little, seeing as how the pegs are the lowest leverage point on the bike.

I've never tried this while emergency stopping but it makes sense to try and lower the centre of gravity this way.
Sewman-Sorry but I've got to completely disagree with this idea for lowering the center of gravity. As long as you are on the bike you are part of the bike, therefore the second you raise your center of gravity you raise the bikes center of gravity. Also, while braking hard the higher center of gravity will increase the overturning moment about the front tire contact patch meaning you can't brake as hard without doing the old front flip. Also you are likely to shift your weight forward to the bars when trying to prop your butt up which would shift your weight forward and increasing the overturing moment even more.

People may ask why do the racers on tv always sit up when braking? They sit up because at the speeds they are braking from (100mph+) their bodies are great air brakes.
 
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My point of view is to try to forget, in case of panic stops, about rear break, you'll end by blocking the rear wheel in 90% of cases, pull the clutch, pull not very hard at the beginning the front break, move your weight over the front wheel, increase the pulling force on the front break progressively, if you have time to shift gears it's perfect, if not forget about that.
If this is happening when you are cornering straight the bike before breaking or you'll fly. After you're stopped don't forget to take a look to what's happening behind.
 

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Tha's a good argument about raising the body's centre of gravity contributing to a bikes' raised centre of gravity and increasing the likelihood of stoppying inadvertantly. <takes a breath> <takes a rest>

So the idea then is to plant your butt on the seat and not try anything funny with weight distribution to your feet? Any agreeing/opposing opinions?:confused
 
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My point of view is to try to forget, in case of panic stops, about rear break, you'll end by blocking the rear wheel in 90% of cases, pull the clutch, pull not very hard at the beginning the front break, move your weight over the front wheel, increase the pulling force on the front break progressively, if you have time to shift gears it's perfect, if not forget about that.
If this is happening when you are cornering straight the bike before breaking or you'll fly. After you're stopped don't forget to take a look to what's happening behind.
 
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Sorry, my english is not very good, I wanted to say to try to move the center of gravity, as much as you can to the front wheel, this will reduce the risk of blocking the front wheel.
 
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serpico said:
Sorry, my english is not very good, I wanted to say to try to move the center of gravity, as much as you can to the front wheel, this will reduce the risk of blocking the front wheel.
Actually you want to keep your center of gravity back from the front wheel as far as possible. This will reduce the static overturning moment about the front wheel. Example-It's a lot harder to flip the bike over the front with someone sitting on the back of the bike than the front. If you can move your center of gravity down and back you can actually brake a lot harder in the long run. The only downside to doing this is that it will take slightly longer to load the front wheel.

All of this talk about center of gravity location means diddly squat when you need to brake in a real hurry 'cause you don't have time to think. In reality don't move around a bunch, you'll just upset the bike. Just learn to progressively load the front wheel naturally when ever you brake.
 

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glowing ghostie!
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serpico said:
My point of view is to try to forget, in case of panic stops, about rear break, you'll end by blocking the rear wheel in 90% of cases, ...
That may make things simpler, but the rear brake still has stopping power that you may need!

At my recent BCSC ERC course (still planning to provide a report on it BTW) we were taught that the ratio between front and rear brake stopping power is 70/30. I thought it would be a bit more biased toward the front, but the point is that the rear brake does offer significant braking power. And if it's a true emergency situation, that extra braking could be the difference between life and death.

Take the time to practice you emergency stops. Hey, it's a lot of fun! And you'll be prepared to act when the unexpected happens.
 
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