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wanker and/or tosser
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As a side note, not directly related to riding in the rain, be careful when entering/exiting and riding around in covered garages like those for apartment buildings or malls. The floors are usually treated with a sealer in high traffic areas, which allows for sliding quite easily. Made worse by leaky engines.
 

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As a side note, not directly related to riding in the rain, be careful when entering/exiting and riding around in covered garages like those for apartment buildings or malls. The floors are usually treated with a sealer in high traffic areas, which allows for sliding quite easily. Made worse by leaky engines.
Not to mention the polished concrete often in parking garages, with wet tires it's very slippery.
 

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Not sure mashing on the brakes to know how much traction always gives reliable info for the next mashing on the brakes time. And why risk going down?

There are other variables to traction in addition to info from previous attempt. Don't wanna be the dude who goes down and says, "gee, I braked exactly the same several times before so I cannot understand..." imo, you don't need to probe the limits of tire adhesion to get an idea of available traction. You can feel it. When traction lower (wet, cold tires, etc) the bike doesn't feel as planted. Maybe on a cruiser is different.
 

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Not sure mashing on the brakes to know how much traction always gives reliable info for the next mashing on the brakes time. And why risk going down?

There are other variables to traction in addition to info from previous attempt. Don't wanna be the dude who goes down and says, "gee, I braked exactly the same several times before so I cannot understand..." imo, you don't need to probe the limits of tire adhesion to get an idea of available traction. You can feel it. When traction lower (wet, cold tires, etc) the bike doesn't feel as planted. Maybe on a cruiser is different.
You are still riding the sheep? "Bah"?
 

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~Sigh~... I know most of you are just condo dwelling yuppies with no understanding how the real world works (like Frosty), who've lived little sheltered lives in moms basement and used her BMW to get to school as a kid. So I'll spare the sarcasm this time.

Most of you (all of you) are a bit stupid when it comes to just noticing what is on the roads next to you. Commerical vehicles, yes millions of them. Now most of you tards commute for less than an hour and you're at work for the next 8 hours, but the commercial vehicles are driving around ALL DAY. Leaking oil from the engine, the transmission, the transfer case, the differantials, the oil bath hubs, the diesel fuel tank, the coolant, the blinker fluid and on and on.

So why do they teach you (like any of you took driver training) not to drive in the "Grease Strip" ? Yeah cause fucking grease from commercial trucks drips there as they slow down, and while idling, all the oil and other fluids leak out in greater concentration.
I have made this point several times. Dirt and gravel is better to deal with than oil IMHO.
 

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:D
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Not sure mashing on the brakes to know how much traction always gives reliable info for the next mashing on the brakes time. And why risk going down?

There are other variables to traction in addition to info from previous attempt. Don't wanna be the dude who goes down and says, "gee, I braked exactly the same several times before so I cannot understand..." imo, you don't need to probe the limits of tire adhesion to get an idea of available traction. You can feel it. When traction lower (wet, cold tires, etc) the bike doesn't feel as planted. Maybe on a cruiser is different.
This is exactly what I was thinking while reading through this thread. Testing your braking abilities on a motorcycle is only valuable (and only marginally so) if you can perfectly replicate the same conditions when you need to brake. I also think that braking habits from bicycle riding ar not transferrable to motorcycles as an ideal behaviour to emulate. Motorcycles have a motor and this (IMO) is your first go-to when needing to brake. It applies a controlled decelleration to the rear tire which you supplement with steady but gentle pressure on your front brake if necessary. The rear brake should only be used as a suplement to the front brake, and only by applying a gentle pressure to assist in bleeding off speed if required.

I ride my bikes in the city in the middle of their power curve, giving me more acceleration by rolling on or engine braking by rolling off the throttle. I rarely touch my brakes and generally only use them for holding the bike still or in the last few meters of decelleration before coming to a complete stop. In wet weather of if the temperature dips, I double up on my following distance and give myself a few extra seconds to brake.

In an emergency, I downshift first, then apply front brakes lightly. It's amazing how much speed you can kill in 3 seconds with the engine alone. If there is anything worth posting a PSA about, I'd have to say it would be LEARN TO ENGINE BRAKE, not encouraging new riders without adequate experience to "test their brakes in the rain..." :2cents
 

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it's good to be good at mashing on the brakes cause there likely will be a time. Every bike/motorcycle has a different feel (weight, seat position, tire, geometry, brake system, etc.). No time for downshift. Clutch in. Don't want to go over,want to know how strong brakes are AND how up to loss of traction feels. Just not sure gotta be testing the front wheel tire traction limit several times a ride to increase safety on the streets. Might hurt. Empty Parking lot maybe better. And again, you can get a feel of traction just by how the bike feels. It feels a little squirrelly and not solid underneath. Don't need max limit to get an idea of available traction. Whether that is used to reduce speed or apply brake appropriately.
 

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you seriously cant tell the difference in traction with your rear brake? And you uncontrollably lock it up during regular rear brake use? Trust me. It is not the bike.


[=bandito;1702224]The back wheel has very little weight on it... it's prone to locking up and skidding at the slightest touch on a street motorcycle... leading the rider to believe there is low traction.

I think this idea is ridiculous. Weight should be transferred to the front wheel, which has the maximum braking capacity, with the greatest braking contact surface.

The whole notion of testing traction by using your rear brake is just silly. You can lock up a rear wheel in an instant on the street, in a place where there is very good grip once force is applied to the front wheel, with the weight of the bike transferring.

Poor advice in my opinion.

Edit: In retrospect, I think this is the worst advice I have read.[/QUOTE]
 

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you seriously cant tell the difference in traction with your rear brake? And you uncontrollably lock it up during regular rear brake use? Trust me. It is not the bike.
Who said I uncontrollably lock it up? The back brake isn't a great guage for traction in my opinion... it has very little force on the contact patch of the tire.
 

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Here is a link to an article I wrote a few years ago for Motorcycle Mojo on the topic of riding in the rain. Good post by the OP, it's important for us to all learn tips to ride safer in the rain, especially living here in wet Vancouver. Ride safe!

http://mistihurst.com/files/M_A_07.pdf
 

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wanker and/or tosser
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Awesome write-up. Thank you for the article. I would also add to not panic and keep calm, something you have done in light of your accident and all the different points made in your article. Training and working hard on improving what you do right and not as quite right will help determine how you behave when the loss of control hits.

Here is a link to an article I wrote a few years ago for Motorcycle Mojo on the topic of riding in the rain. Good post by the OP, it's important for us to all learn tips to ride safer in the rain, especially living here in wet Vancouver. Ride safe!

http://mistihurst.com/files/M_A_07.pdf
 

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From N00bie to Wannabe
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Good Bump! It's slick as cat shit on linoleum this morning! Soapy, greasy foam is everywhere!
 

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Three hour tour guide
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... But so refreshing, patio door's wide open listening to the pitter patter of rain on the trees.
 

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Thanks for the bump. I had a very slow wet weather low side due to an uncleaned oil spill (car crash I guess) and now my wet weather nerves are still a bit shot
 

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lover of twins
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Discussion Starter #38
So why do they teach you (like any of you took driver training) not to drive in the "Grease Strip" ? Yeah cause fucking grease from commercial trucks drips there as they slow down, and while idling, all the oil and other fluids leak out in greater concentration.

So Synco......what do you think happens when they come down a hill and BRAKE for the stop and the bottom? Hmmmmmmm? Yes, all the oil and shit that doesn't normally drip off the cross members that support the engine, trans and diff spill out over the edge of it and splash out on the hills, also the over filled diesel tanks to.

Just wanted to point out that the more I read on here, the more I realize how ignorant most people are. Or just how little clue they have, as to what real dangers there are out there for a motorcyclist.


Hills and gravity, hey who knew right??
a little late on the response, but yes i am and was fully aware at the time of not riding in the grease strip - which i wasn't. and this wasn't a hill, just a slight decline on a road that sees very little to no truck/commercial traffic at all. but thank you for your concern anyway.

the post was/is simply a reminder to test out your braking in a controlled manner at low speeds every once in a while and particularly after some rain following a longer dry spell. imo it's a good idea to have sense of where your braking traction limit is. ymmv.
 

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holy shit it was greasy out there today, wished i would have just parked it and taken the bus to be honest. One guy managed to be humping the concrete median with his Honda Civic at 6 am this morning, and the foam and crap was ridiculous. I felt about 3 levels of confidence lower today, after not riding in it for probably the better part of 4 months. There was just a general air of idiocy about, and i wished i had just avoided it completely. Made it safe, i think i'll just park it for the weekend, let my nerves settle a few days. Careful out there people.
 
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