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94 in BC has about the same knock resistance as Washington 91.
The US is a shit show for fuel consistency though, they're all over the place in quality. Which I'm sure you've experienced.
Before the Chinese flu lockdown, I purchased virtually all my gasoline in WA state. Even for my sorry ass vintage bikes, heavily allergic to ethanol, 0% ethanol 90 octane at a specific gas station in Lynden , were very happy with it. I cannot say I could notice any difference between Cdn Shell 91 or US 76 90, either fuel economy or knock resistance. I am of the opinion that Chevron 94 is a good product in that it has a single source pump , and it is 0% ethanol, but, IMO, it’s ‘octane’ rating , and resultant higher cost is not needed for any but the very rare high compression vintage (read archaic combustion chamber design) car and bike engines.
 

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Then dont buy fuel in BC, as we havent had proper supreme for almost 20 years (2004 iirc)
Or buy aviation gas or race gas. Not sure if airports will fill pails anymore. There are sources for race gas in the area for Area 27.
Right now I don't have a bike that needs high octane but my car does. I'd be happy with Shell but I get discounts at chevron with Journey so I'm not paying full pop for 94.
 

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Or buy aviation gas or race gas. Not sure if airports will fill pails anymore. There are sources for race gas in the area for Area 27.
Right now I don't have a bike that needs high octane but my car does. I'd be happy with Shell but I get discounts at chevron with Journey so I'm not paying full pop for 94.

I used to buy aviation gas years ago from Langley Airport, for a Norton 750 I had with extreme race tune [an ill fated effort] including 12-1 compression. Which is fine for modern TS combustion chambers and EFI, but a recipe for pre-ignition on an old hemi head combustion chambers. 15 yrs ago they banned sale of it to non airplane owners, so I dropped compression pistons into the bike, as it would ping on Chevron 94.
 

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I used to buy aviation gas years ago from Langley Airport, for a Norton 750 I had with extreme race tune [an ill fated effort] including 12-1 compression. Which is fine for modern TS combustion chambers and EFI, but a recipe for pre-ignition on an old hemi head combustion chambers. 15 yrs ago they banned sale of it to non airplane owners, so I dropped compression pistons into the bike, as it would ping on Chevron 94.
If you could source the 100/130LL, it shouldn’t be a problem, but that’s next to impossible to find.

If you want archaic combustion chamber technology mixed with forced induction, look no further than old aircraft engines. Nothing was ever perfect though. The old maritime patrol Argus ran R3350 Wright Cyclone engines. They had 3 turbochargers on each engine and ran water-methanol injection during high power demands. Sitting at the end of the runway at CFB Greenwood on hot summer days and listening to those 4 monsters spinning and spitting as they passed overhead was incredible.
 
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If you could source the 100/130LL, it shouldn’t be a problem, but that’s next to impossible to find.

If you want archaic combustion chamber technology mixed with forced induction, look no further than old aircraft engines. Nothing was ever perfect though. The old maritime patrol Argus ran R3350 Wright Cyclone engines. They had 3 turbochargers on each engine and ran water-methanol injection during high power demands. Sitting at the end of the runway at CFB Greenwood on hot summer days and listening to those 4 monsters spinning and spitting as they passed overhead was incredible.

I remember the Argus training/landing runs in the mid 1970's-early 1980's at Abbotsford when I lived on mum & dad's 20 acres in South-East Langley, the sound of the engines was haunting, unmistakable as an Argus practicing touch -n - go's, all weekend sunrise to sunset.
i sold the '72 Combat hot rod 10 years ago, it spends it's time as a center piece in a spacious Livingroom in an ,,,,,undisclosed location in the southern Cariboo. My current Norton I've emphasized the engine's natural character with cams emphasizing low and midrange grunt, 0% ethanol avoidance to protect the ancient design metallurgy Amal carbs.

The 106 octane I sourced at Langley airport ran SUPER hot, spark plug range had to be dropped 2 levels, still too much, but prevented pinging.
 

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My dad brought home his Super Cub one day. He’s dabbed up a hitch that replaced the tail wheel and hooked up to the back of his Bronco. Popped off the wings, drove it home to recover it in the living room one winter.

He had been at home for about an hour when we heard the approach of an Argus. We were on one of their flight paths from Greenwood over the Atlantic and thought nothing of it. But it kept getting louder. And louder. And soon the house is shaking. He and I run outside and there’s an Argus standing on its wingtip not 300 ft above our house and doing uber tight circles.

My dad says “SHIT!” and runs to the Super Cub. He hadn’t turned the ELT off during his drive home and since he drove everywhere like a bat out of hell, sure enough he set it off. He flips the switch, we look up and that thing was close enough we could see the left seat give a thumbs up before leveling out and heading off to parts unknown.
 

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Confirmed today, Shell no longer sells 0% ethanol in Canada. Their new 93 has 5% ethanol, 91 now has 7-8% ethanol, and 87 now has 10-12% ethanol, depending on season.
 
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