BC Sport Bikes Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a 2001 ninja 250, mostly for commuting but would like to travel from Vancouver to the Okanagan for weekends if possible. does anyone have experience doing this on a smaller bike? or is it something i should avoid?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,764 Posts
WFO all the way and don't let anyone tell you any different !
 

·
BCSB Public Relations
Joined
·
10,276 Posts
Doable, (I did plenty of that on a CBR125) but as posted above, you'll be using a lot of throttle, especially so if you take the Coquihalla.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Not quite a 250, but my wife has done numerous 500km highway days on her ninja 300. Anything is doable. Try it and you'll know if you want to try it again by the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,356 Posts
Wife and I both had 250 Suzuki Marauders way back. Did the Okanagan from the Island a couple times. Loaded for bear too. Awesome fun. They did fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
I used to have an '82 honda 250 v-twin.

I could get it up to about 150km/h on the freeway. Your bike should be able to reach 170km/h or more. These are of course unsafe speeds on public roads.

So whether or not you should ride on the freeway is entirely a question of your ability & confidence, and nothing to do with your bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,199 Posts
I recently purchased a 2001 ninja 250, mostly for commuting but would like to travel from Vancouver to the Okanagan for weekends if possible. does anyone have experience doing this on a smaller bike? or is it something i should avoid?
Not sure of how big you are, frame size,,age? Smaller bikes certainly have the capabilities to travel anywhere. A friend of mine rode his 1958 BSA 250 to New York and back, worked well. It's got more to do with your capabilities regarding physical size versus a smaller machine, and your ability to handle discomfort. Bigger bikes, especially sport touring and ADV bikes usually have much higher grade of comfort, weather protection, and ease of payload capacity. Smaller bikes also have buzzy high revving engines, which, if engineered without internal counterbalancers, the vibes easily transmit through the bars, making hands numb, also a higher discomfort level.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,483 Posts
Not sure of how big you are, frame size,,age? Smaller bikes certainly have the capabilities to travel anywhere. A friend of mine rode his 1958 BSA 250 to New York and back, worked well. It's got more to do with your capabilities regarding physical size versus a smaller machine, and your ability to handle discomfort. Bigger bikes, especially sport touring and ADV bikes usually have much higher grade of comfort, weather protection, and ease of payload capacity. Smaller bikes also have buzzy high revving engines, which, if engineered without internal counterbalancers, the vibes easily transmit through the bars, making hands numb, also a higher discomfort level.
Agreed on size etc.

But even if smaller road choice helps a lot. Going onto things like the Island Highway, is pretty miserable (my wife rides a DR200, no joy above 100 km/h with even a little bit of luggage). Some of the Ninja's with better fairings and slightly better power might be OK, but might have you feeling like a bit of a sitting duck.

When possible, switch routes to a secondary road and life is better, though travel of course takes longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
386 Posts
I recently purchased a 2001 ninja 250, mostly for commuting but would like to travel from Vancouver to the Okanagan for weekends if possible. does anyone have experience doing this on a smaller bike? or is it something i should avoid?
The general consensus is correct I just had a WR250 join me on a 485 km ride 50/50 gravel/pavement. The little bike did great keeping up on the gravel not so much from Pemperton back but he was only an hour behind us mostly due to his frequent stops to give his paws a break. So it can be done no problem but should you avoid it? Depends on how long you want to keep your bike in working order a 19 year old 250 running at higher revs for extended periods of time may decide to take a shit on its own time frame not yours:poop: I recommend taking the senic route and making it an all day ride your old 250 will thank you with some extra kms on the odo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,765 Posts
these threads are great..

i dont think 250s, 300s were necessarily designed with the open road in mind. lol

engine size does matter, believe it or not.. sue me. :D

never-mind the fact a sneeze would throw you off your line, why would
anybody want to tangle with big ass rigs out there..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
386 Posts
Ya small bikes suck on hwys but for a 400 km ride it could be fun if you stay off the hwy as much as possible and manage to find a side route where you can average 60 kph with less traffic passing you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
My wife did a good number of little trips up to 500km days on her ninja 300 she had no issue with actual highway speeds and not getting blown all over the road. You certainly don't need to stick to 60kph side roads to enjoy the ride. I have a distinct memory of following her last year between fauquier and nakusp and seeing 160 on the speedo. Sold that bike this year with 40,000km on it. Running like a top still. Now she has the 400 which.....is even lighter than the 300. Couple thousand km on it and zero complaints so far.

I also had a r3 and had no issues with highway speeds. The only issue I have with small displacement bikes is the lack of brutal acceleration and top end pulling power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,765 Posts
OMG.. a girl, breaking the law.. 160kph! on public roads tisk tisk! shame!


is that what you wanted to hear? :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:

for comparison purposes only.. we average 650 to 1k km days while on holiday.

you're kind of missing the point.. i'm comfortable and ready for a beer after 700kms

bigger bikes are just way the fvck more comfortable, you might say, built for purpose on hand..

you, personally may not, but that wasnt the question ;)

when passing large vehicles on US highways, at US speeds, you dont want to be a
fly on the wall, trying to get across 4 lanes to make your exit.. Thats no fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
We don't travel those kinds of roads by choice, but then again that wasn't really the question was it? The question also wasn't would a big cruiser or tourer be more comfortable? Vancouver to the okanagan on a 250 ninja was the question not doing cross border battling on the I5 or doing 700 to 1k days. Some of the replies made it sound like it'd either blow up, be blown off the road or they'd need the whole weekend just to recover from the arduous journey. I was just adding some perspective from having had an assortment of small displacement bikes in recent years.

As to the other odd part of your response, honestly I could give a flying fuck what you think about how my wife rides. But rest assured little ninjas are capable of highway speeds, espescially bc highways. Which was the point I was trying to illustrate. Of course none of us speed because it's been pointed out to me numerous times that if one were to admit to speeding on this forum of course the rcmp would show up the very next day. Arrests, impounds, unthinkable atroticities would rain down upon the guilty lawbreaker.

Is that what you wanted to hear?:devilish::eek::p:LOL:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,733 Posts
This is something I looked at before buying a Ninja 300, generally you'll find that people do it quite successfully but it's not for everyone.

I found it ok, the bike was turning around 7000RPM at about 100k but it wasn't buzzy and I didn't feel too vulnerable but just due to the physical size of the bike, at over 6' tall I wouldn't have wanted to do it for hours on end. Passing had to be a bit more planned than on my 750 but it was possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,356 Posts
these threads are great..

i dont think 250s, 300s were necessarily designed with the open road in mind. lol

engine size does matter, believe it or not.. sue me. :D

never-mind the fact a sneeze would throw you off your line, why would
anybody want to tangle with big ass rigs out there..
You, obviously, have not owned a modern day 300. A bike capable of 160 -170 kph is quite comfortable at highway speeds all day long. They are not blown off the road by big rigs. Buy a tall adventure bike and experience the buffeting and crosswinds then get back to us. This is if you ever hit the open road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,765 Posts
still a small ass bike, why the fvck would i even want to.. When liter-bikes are the
size of 600s, i simply dont see the point.. But then you guys must know a
better way to go 'full pretzel' position.. Must come with being modern humans. ;)

'your' mileage may vary.. i dont ride dual sports, but i'm sure you're gonna run
around telling every other rider with a bike bigger than a noodle, they're wrong.

'laws of physics' still apply, weather you like it or not..



As to the other odd part of your response, honestly I could give a flying fuck what you think about how my wife rides. But rest assured little ninjas are capable of highway speeds, espescially bc highways.
dude, learn to take a joke. you're the only one that posted speeds reached.. seemed to be
fair play.. sue me.. i've come across a few riders on small ass bikes out there, and yes
the engine is screaming like a fvcking banshee, at said 160kph..

honestly, i dont think the US and Canada are that much different, in traffic with big rigs
around, you're still tiny as all fack, and YES of course the other drivers on the road will
have a very hard time seeing you in the 1st place. No you will not be able to throttle out
of dangerous situations anywhere nearly as easy compared to a literbike, out on the
open road.. If you want to argue that, please go ahead, we're just here for a laugh anyway..

A literbike / or 1854cc cruiser engine will not be pushed anywhere near the fvcking level a
pee-wee bike engine would.. that is simply fvcking logic, or would you like an engine builder
explain to you how things work? Just because you swear its exactly as you think, does not
mean that engine is happy. In the long run, maintenance required, is higher.

the rest of us will continue to ride/ own bikes that are 'better' suited to the task.. if you think
limiting your riding to BC will suddenly make that tiny noodle feel like a 1290 Super Duke.

go ahead, cant cross the border this year anyway.. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
I'm not running around telling people shit. Other than I'd tell anyone with a well maintained small displacement ninja or other 'sport' bike, 'no problem to run from Vancouver to the interior'.

I will tell you one thing though. You do know that the small displacement entry level 'sport' bikes in no way whatsoever share the brutal ergonomics of a full supersport right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,765 Posts
doesnt really matter, very easy to make most supersport bikes ergonomically comfortable..
seen hundreds of examples.

i can understand folks wanting something thats ridiculously cheap, Weather it can survive the trip or not just doesn't appear to be a very realistic argument, at least not one that would entice me to purchase one..

i'm sure just about any bike out there will fall apart if not properly maintained. For the most part when you speak of maintenance, people only think of oil changes, and tire swaps, a spark plug here n' there. What i'm speaking of is wear and tear on internal engine components / parts.

Not that it really matters though, most dont keep bikes for long, certainly dont put any miles on.

i was going to post a youtube video but the 1st description of a Ninja 250R in terms of what it can, cannot do all start with the rider admitting he is a 1st time rider/ gf bought him a new bike for Xmas. Quote: "it can do 100 miles/hr. depending on wind direction.. most i got out of it was maybe 105, downhill".. aka, beating the crap out of the engine. Further effort finds every other video clearly showing a tach. which red-lines at say 3 to 4 o'clock while the needle sits steady at almost 2 o'clock. Sure, its on the hwy but its working 3 times as hard than any road going vehicle really should, essentially barely fighting the wind. Another video shows the rider consantly complaining how other 'drivers' hunk at 'em, or stare them down as they pass by.. This does not scream 'confidence' by any means, shape or form. On the contrary, it shows drivers rightly pissed off at the noob on two wheels.

i'm gonna get off the floor now.. can you see how the wear / tear in said engine compared to
a liter-bike that will do 100 mph/ IN 1st gear would be substantially higher? But more to the
point you have to be a pretty damn specific body style, weight / height to be able to get
that type of 'fun' out of a noodle. I bet they make excellent commuters, if you live in Langley.

Its hard to justify such a response as "its fine, you'll be fine" here.. there's a little more to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
Do you feel threatened in a personal way by small displacement bikes? Are you insecure or confused about your displacement class?
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top